R/C Tech Forums

Go Back   R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Electric On-Road

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-03-2004, 11:54 AM   #106
Tech Master
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,204
Default Indeed I have read them all I particularly like this one.....

Quote:
Originally posted by Entropy
Mabuchi:

I think its best to go with the car that you like if budget isn't an issue. Better to die with your loved one, than to live with one you hate

Since parts support is non-existant for any car, it don't matter which car you get.

In the end, parts only break if you crash your car often and/or you're a reckless driver.

The only reason to stay away from a particular car is if it has a systemic flaw. Something that breaks regularly in the normal running of the car rather than user error.

I personally have a Pro4 and a TA04, both I got because I liked. Despite their flaws (if any), I still make them run the best they can, because I like them alot.
Doesn't make the choice any easier though when trying to decide the lesser of 4 evils.
Mabuchi540 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2004, 12:12 PM   #107
Tech Elite
 
fatdoggy's Avatar
R/C Tech Charter Subscriber
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: MD USA
Posts: 3,642
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by Mabuchi540
Now that just sounds like ride height adjustment?
No you set ride height with preload on your shocks. After that you adjust droop so that you have a few mm of lift before the chassis lifts the wheels off the ground. Why? Becuase when you use the brakes your car(drops front, lifts the rear) or accelerates (front lifts, rear drops). If you didn't have droop it could cause understeer while accelerateing and oversteer while braking.
fatdoggy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2004, 12:22 PM   #108
Tech Master
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,204
Thumbs up Tah for the info

Quote:
Originally posted by fatdoggy
No you set ride height with preload on your shocks. After that you adjust droop so that you have a few mm of lift before the chassis lifts the wheels off the ground. Why? Becuase when you use the brakes your car(drops front, lifts the rear) or accelerates (front lifts, rear drops). If you didn't have droop it could cause understeer while accelerateing and oversteer while braking.
Doh
Mabuchi540 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2004, 03:48 PM   #109
Tech Addict
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Auckland,New Zealand
Posts: 590
Default Re: Tah for the info

Quote:
Originally posted by Mabuchi540
Doh
Mabuchi540

After your comments on what is droop, please be very carefull in what car you pick, the cars you have mentioned are VERY tuneable and if you dont know what droop, roll, centers, caster, camber etc etc do you maybe using the car once and finding that you dont want to drive it again because its a pian to drive and you dont know how to set it up
Brett.w is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2004, 04:52 PM   #110
Tech Elite
 
ottoman's Avatar
R/C Tech Charter Subscriber
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: wisconsin
Posts: 2,761
Trader Rating: 13 (100%+)
Default

Judging from your comments on "droop" and the one about how you adjust your driving and not the car I think it may take a little time for you to get up to speed.. so to speak.
I will go back to my original sugestion.... go to the track where you will race and watch the fast guys... see what cars they drive, talk to them and get their opinions on gear ratio, chassis setups, cars, spares to buy etc. This will move you much farther along the learning curve and probably save you money in the long run.
ottoman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2004, 05:05 PM   #111
Tech Elite
 
ChrisP's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Shelby Twp, MI
Posts: 2,046
Trader Rating: 8 (100%+)
Default

CAreful guys..he's gonna rant and call you both names...because 12yrs ago he was off-road king
ChrisP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2004, 05:54 PM   #112
Tech Adept
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 209
Default

I think the difference between the cars in the list for all but the very top drivers is irrelevant.

Car set up is critical. I really struggled to get my multi-adjustable car sorted. It was hard to control and as a result I crashed a lot. It was no fun at all to drive. Now I'm rapt with it. I'm really pleased I perservered, it is very satisfying to solve problems.

My best and final advice is pick the one that attracts you most - not what other people like, then work on driving and set up until
you are racing with similar spec cars, (as opposed to being in the same race).

Cheers
Peter
Pedro 51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2004, 07:28 PM   #113
Tech Master
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,204
Default Re: Re: Tah for the info

Quote:
Originally posted by Voodo_Magic
Mabuchi540

After your comments on what is droop, please be very carefull in what car you pick, the cars you have mentioned are VERY tuneable and if you dont know what droop, roll, centers, caster, camber etc etc do you maybe using the car once and finding that you dont want to drive it again because its a pian to drive and you dont know how to set it up
Apart from the droop term which I'd never heard before I do know what the terms mean I just never bothered with them apart from for example adjusting the springs I'd usually stick with the out of the box settings as one presumes the manufactures didn't happen apon them by accident. And I was never really one to "hopup" up a car with after market bits (the belt drive Rc10 not withstanding).

To Pedro 51: Thanks for the comment it helped a decision.

Last edited by Mabuchi540; 06-03-2004 at 07:38 PM.
Mabuchi540 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2004, 08:08 PM   #114
Tech Fanatic
 
Rob Mincey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 872
Default Long post... sorry. ;)

Droop can be a powerful tuning adjustment. In fact, when my car's not handling the way I'd like it to, I generally start adjusting droop before anything else (camber, caster, wheelbase, etc...)

There are some pretty good sources online regarding chasis setup. One that comes to mind is:

http://ebiz.netopia.com/competitionx...ationdatabase/

The site is geared towards the Associated TC3, but the concepts are universal. Also, if you know anyone with an XRay car, ask them to look at their setup guide that comes with every XRay kit. Additionally, the XXX Main setup guide is awesome. I've refererenced a friend's copy a handful of times, and I've been so impressed that I'm going to buy one.

Of course, RCTech is an incredible repository for information. Off the top of my head, Barry Baker, Josh Cyrul, Todd Hodge, and Chris Tosolini all have "Ask ______" threads here and all have been willing to help people with setup questions.

Your comment regarding "manufacturers didn't stumble across that by accident" is true, but not entirely applicable to most of us. I have never run a car with the box stock setup for long - I usually end up taming the car a bit, as I don't necessarily want the rear end of my car as aggressive as some of the manufacturers' setups end up providing.

You've mentioned that you typically don't alter the car, rather you alter your driving to match what the car is doing. I, too, did that when I first started running touring cars, and what I found was this: I became significantly faster when I stopped driving the car in whatever state it happened to be in at the time and started adjusting the car to suit my driving. It's hard enough to develop good driving techniques with a perfectly functioning race car, but it's near impossible to utilize good techniques you've accumulated over time when you're chasing the car. So many variables in a race change during the course of the day - track temperature, traction, and yes, your car's adjustments will change too. Knowing how to tame the car through proper adjustment will allow you to focus on utilizing your driving skill.

Hope this helped. Don't mean to tell you what to do, but when you post in public forums, you gotta expect people to offer their opinions.

Best of luck with your racing. And, for what it's worth, all of the cars you're considering are good cars. I wouldn't say one is any better than the other. Any car can win on any given day, given the right driver. Heck, Barry Baker could probably 2-lap me and my XRay using a Tyco R/C car bought at a discount store.

Rob
Rob Mincey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2004, 08:32 PM   #115
Tech Master
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,204
Default Yes it did actually thanks....

and of course I have to take into account that out of the box settings for a 540 stock motor car in off road are going to be somewhat different speed wise compared to the same motor in a modern on-road. Actually the first thing I might do is turn the throttle setting down to 80% (once I figure out the transmitter manuel ) Ooo look at all the buttons
Mabuchi540 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2004, 08:36 PM   #116
Tech Fanatic
 
Rob Mincey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Tulsa, OK
Posts: 872
Default Re: Yes it did actually thanks....

Quote:
Originally posted by Mabuchi540
Actually the first thing I might do is turn the throttle setting down to 80% (once I figure out the transmitter manuel ) Ooo look at all the buttons
Nahhhh. Just exercise some throttle control.

Rob
Rob Mincey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2004, 08:48 PM   #117
Tech Fanatic
 
Entropy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Singapore
Posts: 965
Default

Just get a TL01.

Geez, I've been beaten myself by a good driver with a TL01 and a 11T motor.

Plus, parts are cheap and the car is durable, droop is also a non issue
Entropy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2004, 09:50 PM   #118
Tech Master
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,204
Default Re: Long post... sorry. ;)

Quote:
Originally posted by losirob
Droop can be a powerful tuning adjustment. In fact, when my car's not handling the way I'd like it to, I generally start adjusting droop before anything else (camber, caster, wheelbase, etc...)

There are some pretty good sources online regarding chasis setup. One that comes to mind is:

http://ebiz.netopia.com/competitionx...ationdatabase/

The site is geared towards the Associated TC3, but the concepts are universal. Also, if you know anyone with an XRay car, ask them to look at their setup guide that comes with every XRay kit. Additionally, the XXX Main setup guide is awesome. I've refererenced a friend's copy a handful of times, and I've been so impressed that I'm going to buy one.

Of course, RCTech is an incredible repository for information. Off the top of my head, Barry Baker, Josh Cyrul, Todd Hodge, and Chris Tosolini all have "Ask ______" threads here and all have been willing to help people with setup questions.

Your comment regarding "manufacturers didn't stumble across that by accident" is true, but not entirely applicable to most of us. I have never run a car with the box stock setup for long - I usually end up taming the car a bit, as I don't necessarily want the rear end of my car as aggressive as some of the manufacturers' setups end up providing.

You've mentioned that you typically don't alter the car, rather you alter your driving to match what the car is doing. I, too, did that when I first started running touring cars, and what I found was this: I became significantly faster when I stopped driving the car in whatever state it happened to be in at the time and started adjusting the car to suit my driving. It's hard enough to develop good driving techniques with a perfectly functioning race car, but it's near impossible to utilize good techniques you've accumulated over time when you're chasing the car. So many variables in a race change during the course of the day - track temperature, traction, and yes, your car's adjustments will change too. Knowing how to tame the car through proper adjustment will allow you to focus on utilizing your driving skill.

Hope this helped. Don't mean to tell you what to do, but when you post in public forums, you gotta expect people to offer their opinions.

Best of luck with your racing. And, for what it's worth, all of the cars you're considering are good cars. I wouldn't say one is any better than the other. Any car can win on any given day, given the right driver. Heck, Barry Baker could probably 2-lap me and my XRay using a Tyco R/C car bought at a discount store.

Rob
Hey thanks I just checked out that site you mentioned and it turns out I do know what it is...everyone calls it droop apprently (the picture explained it all). I always just used to call it "that which I had to alter drastically when I raced my off-roader on-road" I just never had a name for it.
Mabuchi540 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2004, 10:29 PM   #119
Tech Adept
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Posts: 116
Default

You say you're going to race in Wellington? Why don't you just talk to a guy called Kelvin Wong (I think he's in Wellington somewhere) and see what he can offer you. He stocks the up to date equipment for onroad and SPARE parts for the cars he sells. Ask Pedro 51 for his contact details. Maybe you could get your brother to bring you a car (as thats what you seem intent on doing) that Kelvin carries spares for? I have to keep on reminding myself that your not a newbie, and that obviously you would know that a good car is a necessity, but a excellent driver is essential towards being fast . .
Trevor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2004, 10:44 PM   #120
Tech Master
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 1,204
Default Well after a 12 year....

break I might as well be lol(lucky the local high school has two new netball courts to practice on). And I don't actually intend racing in Wellington I'm just going to have a look when some of the Manawatu guys go for a race, I'll most likely stick to Palmy when they get a track sussed.

Last edited by Mabuchi540; 06-03-2004 at 10:49 PM.
Mabuchi540 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Narrowed it down! rcrevolution Nitro Off-Road 23 04-29-2008 08:25 PM
23mm Wabash w/ BowTies - Narrowed Wolverini R/C Items: For Sale/Trade 3 05-28-2007 10:56 AM
narrowed wheels wd40prerunner Micro and Mini Scales 1 02-04-2007 12:42 PM
Panther Pythons on Wabash wheels(narrowed) riverrevo R/C Items: For Sale/Trade 0 04-10-2006 02:08 PM
Big Jim's narrowed Reedy brushes for the MVP coolrcdad R/C Items: For Sale/Trade 4 09-30-2002 06:04 PM



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. It is currently 06:53 AM.


Powered By: vBulletin v3.9.2.1
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Advertise Content © 2001-2011 RCTech.net