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Checking diff tightness...

Checking diff tightness...

Old 07-10-2010, 09:34 PM
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Default Checking diff tightness...

Well, I melted both diff's in my Cyclone S. Front diff screw snapped and rear diff screw came undone. Now I got some better parts, I need to readjust to ensure they are not too tight or too loose. How does everyone check the tightness when installed on a car? I already put screwdrivers in both outdrives and the pulley does not move according to the instructions, but they seem way too loose when installed on the car.

I have heard of some people just spinning one wheel and feel the tension. Someone also told me to hold the spur and one tire and spin the other tire and you find the true tightness of the diff.

I want my front diff kind of tight and my rear diff kind of loose. Thanks for any info...
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Old 07-10-2010, 10:13 PM
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Well, different people will use different methods, but I prefer to put my car in my lap, use one hand/arm to hold a pair of wheels still & then try to turn the spur with the other. If I can turn it some, then it's probably too loose, I prefer to have it where it takes a good deal of effort to budge the spur at all(this is about checking the rear diff, btw), & if the effort feels right & the diff still feels smooth when the car is suspended then I figure it's about right(& thus far it's worked out well that way, I've hardly ever melted a diff since I started running touring cars back in '96). And as for the front, just figure on that, & then tighten a little more at a time till you get the feel you want(just make a small tighening up front & try some practice laps, then tighten again if you need more, do it a bit at a time till you get what you want).....
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Old 07-10-2010, 10:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Grizzbob View Post
Well, different people will use different methods, but I prefer to put my car in my lap, use one hand/arm to hold a pair of wheels still & then try to turn the spur with the other. If I can turn it some, then it's probably too loose, I prefer to have it where it takes a good deal of effort to budge the spur at all.
+1

With direct drive cars this is vary important.
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Old 07-11-2010, 12:20 AM
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Cool, thanks. I readjusted and used your method of holding both wheels and tried to move the spur. When holding the rear, the spur is hard to move but it does so smoothly with heavy resistance. When holding the front wheels, the spur does not move unless I use some force. When the car is on a stand, the diffs are both silky smooth. I will try it out on the track and adjust as needed. thanks for the tip!
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Old 07-11-2010, 01:11 AM
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Do you mean Diff or Slipper? Because some of this sounds like you're adjusting your slipper.

When I check the front/rear diffs on my Schumacher, I somehow keep the rear wheels from turning (in my lap, on a table, whatever) and turn the front wheels on their own to feel what it takes for them to rotate to feel that diff. I then spin it around and do the same for the rear wheels.

Once your diffs are set you really shouldn't mess with them much if at all. I never touch mine other than rebuilding them or in the odd case if they some how work loose or whatever.
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Old 07-11-2010, 08:49 PM
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Originally Posted by heavyjeffd View Post
Do you mean Diff or Slipper? Because some of this sounds like you're adjusting your slipper.

When I check the front/rear diffs on my Schumacher, I somehow keep the rear wheels from turning (in my lap, on a table, whatever) and turn the front wheels on their own to feel what it takes for them to rotate to feel that diff. I then spin it around and do the same for the rear wheels.

Once your diffs are set you really shouldn't mess with them much if at all. I never touch mine other than rebuilding them or in the odd case if they some how work loose or whatever.
Might be right, except that the Cyclone S doesn't have any kind of slipper, just diffs....
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Old 07-11-2010, 10:15 PM
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Ah, gotcha. Not familiar with the Cyclone S., apologies there.
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