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Old 05-23-2004, 09:47 PM   #16
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Default Re: Re: Motor terminology

Quote:
Originally posted by NismoSkyline17
They use triples and quads in 1/12th and 1/10th pan cars were they don't need torque.
I hear from some of the ppl I race with they use singles in their 1/12th's because they wind up faster under low-voltage

Okay...looking at the Newton ratings of these motors

Monster: 97 Newtons, Chameleon: 130 Newtons, D5 131 Newtons
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Old 05-23-2004, 09:49 PM   #17
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I kinda see what Black Kat is getting at though. You stick a 11 single arm into a stock 27 turn can and its gonna produce more torque AND rpm cuz theres a lot less wire there. Now if the wire is the same gauge (24) then I dont know whats gonna happen cuz an 11 single is usually some fat wire.
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Old 05-24-2004, 04:00 AM   #18
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Default Watts

True Watts = Volts times Amps. There are approx 750 Watts in one horse power.

Horse Power = RPM X TORQUE divided by a constant. I can't remember it right now.

The torque from lower wind motors is at a higher RPM. So you have to gear them lower to use it.

And yes look again

27 turn = 22,000 RPM
19 Turn = 23,000 RPM
11 Turn = 29,900 RPM

To have the car go approx the same speed, they have to be geared different.
BUT if geared correctly, they will have loads of power.
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Old 05-24-2004, 04:20 AM   #19
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Default Re: Motor terminology

Quote:
Originally posted by t3guy
If triple and quad aren't as "torquey" as single and double, why do people use em in cars?
First you have to understand that total horsepower that motor produces is torque multiplied by RPM. When you tune motors you usually lower torque to raise RPM, if you raise RPM more than you lower the torque you'll get more powerful motor. Then you gear the motor to have peak power at middle of the straight at normal track. What few people realize is that the same motor needs different gearing when you change the tuning.

Singles, doubles, triples or quads? It doesn't really matter. It's the total diameter (gauge) of all wires on the armature that decides how much torque you get for any given turn. The higher number of wires you use for any given total diameter the more compact the winding (less airgap between wires) becomes and easier to wind up to a point.

The more wire (mass) you put in a motor, you increase torque but add weight. You've got to think about physical limitations too, not just electrical. By adding weight you reduce efficiency and increase spool up time.

Hope this helps
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Old 05-24-2004, 08:50 AM   #20
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Default Re: Watts

Quote:
Originally posted by David Root
True Watts = Volts times Amps. There are approx 750 Watts in one horse power.

Horse Power = RPM X TORQUE divided by a constant. I can't remember it right now.

The torque from lower wind motors is at a higher RPM. So you have to gear them lower to use it.

And yes look again

27 turn = 22,000 RPM
19 Turn = 23,000 RPM
11 Turn = 29,900 RPM

To have the car go approx the same speed, they have to be geared different.
BUT if geared correctly, they will have loads of power.
Sounds good...

Quote:
The more wire (mass) you put in a motor, you increase torque but add weight. You've got to think about physical limitations too, not just electrical. By adding weight you reduce efficiency and increase spool up time.
Why some people put singles in 1/12ths? ^

Last edited by The Black Kat; 05-24-2004 at 09:12 AM.
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Old 05-24-2004, 09:07 AM   #21
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The Black Kat - When driving 1/12th scale doing everything smothly is a must. So using a motor like a double or triple will smoothen out the power output and make the car easier to drive. Also when making 8 minutes you may be able to gear slightly more aggressively with a double or triple then you would with a single, since a single will chew more power. Also 1/12th scales are so light that you don't need the punch of a single to like you do in a touring car.
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