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Old 06-19-2010, 05:16 PM   #1
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Questions?? drift VS other

so i am possibly looking in to getting a street Rc car and i really want to know the difference between drift and the other street cars?

this includes cost function and all that other jazz, like i want to know everything OH and if you see or have any good deals please PM me, thanks

Thomas
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Old 06-19-2010, 06:10 PM   #2
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can anybody help?
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Old 06-19-2010, 07:09 PM   #3
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The main difference is, drift cars are mainly designed for drifting. Funny that.
In saying that, most drift=spec cars can be raced, and vice versa.
Do you want to race at a club?, cut laps up and down the street?, drift?
The type of chassis you want really depends on what you want to do with it
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Old 06-19-2010, 07:18 PM   #4
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it would best if you research and try it out yourself, there are lots of drift communities out there. there may even be rc drift clubs near your vicinity. there is a local thread here at RCTech, just do a search on drift or drifting. you may want to visit www.driftercentral.com which is an international forum dedicated to rc drifting.

basically in rc grip racing you control the car to get the best lines and have the best lap times. in rc drifting you need to do what we call a controlled chaos, you let the car slip and slide around a corner by controlling the speed and angle to get that perfect drift. the cars used in rc drifting mostly share the same components for race cars it's the wheels and how the car is tuned thats different.

hth!
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Old 06-19-2010, 07:28 PM   #5
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Regular RC TC can be turned into Drift.
It takes a bit more tuning or added adjustable parts to make a Drifter Track worthy.

If you plan to go the track and you are actually going to run on a track.
I would advice you to get a higher end TC car, which you then can turn into a Drifter also. This way you spend money once to do both.
If you buy a dedicated drift car it takes a bit of parts and headache to make it track worthy.

Also drifting in an open parking lot looks fun gets boring fast and it seems easy which it is.
But Try drifting on a track its a totally different story, and making it look good is a bit harder not hitting anything is even harder.

A competition drifter tend to run most of the stuff opposite to a regular TC
Front Grip, Rear Locked Diff, Odd camber for looks or loose grip.
They tend to like weight shift alot to the front. Very balanced.
Similar to Dirt Oval Cars, the rear is very Floaty but still controlable.
Drifter racer you have to be able to knwo how far you can slide predict the uncontrolled slide and make it controlled.

Regular TC racers is all about Grip more grip and grip.
Locked diffs are normally front for the straight pull.
you want ur rear to be planted depends on how you drive.
Grip racers reflexes have to be fast and on the spot be in control.

As the person above mentioned.
Drifting is about style and Looks. It looks great and Fun its very relaxing if you are used to it.
But drifting on a track isnt as easy as alot of people think and making it look good takes some skill.

Same goes for Racing Racing. Its fast intense. Fastest car is wroth nothing if you dont have teh skill to make it fast.
For me its alot more concentration to Race Race, and every decision has to be precise to the dot else you off ur line.

Both are FUN =D

I have a Team Magic E4FS Chassi Roller if you are interested.
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Old 06-21-2010, 07:57 PM   #6
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well thanks for the info, and i like the "normal" non-drifting cars a lil more but now here is the bad question

not counting batterys or like a controler could i get a ok car that will still be fun n not break? or should i just go and get a good BL system and a good car platform?
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Old 07-05-2012, 08:20 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bearman71 View Post
so i am possibly looking in to getting a street Rc car and i really want to know the difference between drift and the other street cars?

this includes cost function and all that other jazz, like i want to know everything OH and if you see or have any good deals please PM me, thanks

Thomas
Hey Thomas.
A street car(Touring car) compare to a drift car is not the same on car settings, driving skills are totally not the same also.
Can't really explain it in words, you have to try it than you will know.
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Old 07-06-2012, 10:03 AM   #8
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A good touring car will make a good drift car with a few simple changes.
Locking the rear diff - this will cause the rear end to break loose in a turn. Bad for grip, good for drift
Drift tires - a hard plastic that allows for a small amount of traction
A large engine - since there is a reduced amount of friction with plastic tires an increased wheel speed helps with long drifts and power to break traction before entering a turn.

From there it will be small tweaks to fit your driving style, front 1 way diff (works like and e brake in real cars), soft springs, low weight shock oils.
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Old 07-06-2012, 11:08 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bearman71 View Post
well thanks for the info, and i like the "normal" non-drifting cars a lil more but now here is the bad question

not counting batterys or like a controler could i get a ok car that will still be fun n not break? or should i just go and get a good BL system and a good car platform?
Go visit HotShot Rc right by the Coke plant on 41 in Marietta (1050 Industrial Park Drive Suite C Marietta, GA 30062). They'll point you in the right direction, and they carry several brands and parts.
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Old 07-06-2012, 02:01 PM   #10
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I have two drift cars, a TT-01E and a TRF416 clone. Both are standard touring car layout with rear-mounted motor and longitudinal battery. I have not had the opportunity to run a drift-specific front/mid motor layout, but until then I don't believe that weight distribution makes much difference that can't be compensated for by driver skill.

My TT-01E is mostly stock except for bearings, front CVDs (and ball diff), and brushless system. I used to run locked rear diff but I am back to using the stock open gear diff and I am doing fine with it since my skill improved. Equal front/rear drive ratio is really easy (too easy) to drift.

I recently set up the China 416 clone documented at one10drift. The biggest changes I made here are overdriven rear wheels/underdriven front wheels at 1.72 ratio, and I fabricated a custom steering link to increase the steering angle. What most people here neglect to say is that setting up a drift car will benefit from both increased steering angle as well as reduced Ackerman angle.

That being said, drifting 50-50 drive ratio is easy. At the bare minimum just take any 4WD touring car and throw some drift tires on and with a little practice you will be able to do tight switches and wide sweeps at will. Countersteer drifting is where the setup becomes a bit more involved and also makes the car impractical to use for grip driving.

If you are starting out, I would recommend just get a basic 2-belt TC chassis. Keep it stock and learn on that first, and once you can do tight doughnuts and figure-8s around some dots then you can start changing the pulleys for overdrive which is slightly more challenging to control but looks way cool.
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