Go Back  R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Electric On-Road
R/C Car Handling Characteristics >

R/C Car Handling Characteristics

R/C Car Handling Characteristics

Old 05-05-2004, 02:28 AM
  #1  
Tech Initiate
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 47
Default R/C Car Handling Characteristics

I just bought an rc touring car from my local hobby shop in the UK and need help regarding some basic handling matters.

Description/How to change/Effect in handling re:

- Centre of Gravity
- Roll Center
EUracer is offline  
Old 05-05-2004, 03:28 AM
  #2  
Tech Initiate
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 20
Default

I don't know what car you have but you should go to http://www.teamassociated.com and download the Tuning Guide for the TC3. This will cost 3 or 4 and details all the setup changes and what affect they have. Although your car may be different the principles will be the same.

In the same section they have the "RC Handbook V2" which is free but less detailed.

Another option is the XXX Main Touring Car Chassis Setup Guide which is pricey but probably the best resource to teach you about setting a car up. www.apexmodels.com have it for 15.
colinradford is offline  
Old 05-05-2004, 03:56 AM
  #3  
Tech Initiate
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 47
Default

Colinradford: Thanks for the info and the prices

Noone can give me just a basic/simple description and effects on handling/traction
EUracer is offline  
Old 05-05-2004, 04:53 AM
  #4  
Tech Master
iTrader: (35)
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: MD
Posts: 1,499
Trader Rating: 35 (100%+)
Default

Try this site: http://ebiz.netopia.com/competitionx...ationdatabase/

Here's another: http://home.tiscali.be/be067749/58/

Both of these sites have comprehensive information on setup and handling as it would apply to most cars.

Also, it's free!!!

Cheerz
Geppetto is offline  
Old 05-05-2004, 05:31 AM
  #5  
Tech Initiate
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 47
Default

Geppetto: Thanks for the links to free information

However after reading, reading and more reading was still a bit confused and I will be grateful if someone can answer the following questions for me.

- Lowering the Roll Center, will it increase or decrease chassis roll?
- Lowering the Roll Center, will it increase or decrease traction of that part of the car?
EUracer is offline  
Old 05-05-2004, 06:13 AM
  #6  
Tech Regular
iTrader: (2)
 
jedi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 422
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

both increase!!!
jedi is offline  
Old 05-05-2004, 06:15 AM
  #7  
Tech Fanatic
 
Chill Will's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: The Dirty South
Posts: 804
Default

Lower roll center will decrease the body roll. Good for carpet racing or very high bite tracks.

Higher roll center will increase traction on low bite tracks and will have more body roll.
Chill Will is offline  
Old 05-05-2004, 06:20 AM
  #8  
Tech Elite
 
sosidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Bristol, UK
Posts: 3,975
Default

Originally posted by Chill Will
Lower roll center will decrease the body roll. Good for carpet racing or very high bite tracks.

Higher roll center will increase traction on low bite tracks and will have more body roll.
Wrong way round - Low RC increases body roll and vice versa.

With a low RC, there is a bigger gap between the RC and the cars Center of Gravity.

So the CG has more leverage around the RC, and the car rolls more when cornering.
sosidge is offline  
Old 05-05-2004, 06:31 AM
  #9  
Tech Initiate
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 47
Default

Thanks guys, bit honestly I am a bit confused here, who is right or wrong

If a low RC increase body roll, will traction increase or decrease at that particular end of the car?
EUracer is offline  
Old 05-05-2004, 06:56 AM
  #10  
Tech Elite
 
speedxl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Portland Oregon.
Posts: 3,894
Default

eu chill will is corect.
what has a greater chance of tipping over
a . a lowered car or a raised car.
a lowered car has less traction under a slippery condition but the car that is stock hieght will roll more so it will achieve more wieght transfer to the outter wheels.
when the traction level is high you want the car to be planted less so there is less loss of corner speed . the ide is to find a compromise if you gain in one you loose in the other. good luck.

just experiment that is the only way you will fully understand.
speedxl is offline  
Old 05-05-2004, 07:27 AM
  #11  
Tech Initiate
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 47
Default

I know that most probably I need to figure out this myself on the track, but can you guys agree on something

If the ROLL CENTER is lowered, will BODY ROLL & TRACTION increase or decrease?

(It seems that my question is too difficult even for you guys )
EUracer is offline  
Old 05-05-2004, 07:31 AM
  #12  
Tech Initiate
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 47
Default

On a low traction track, what will be the best setup? Having high or low roll center in general?
EUracer is offline  
Old 05-05-2004, 07:48 AM
  #13  
Tech Elite
iTrader: (33)
 
Jack Smash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Reno, NV
Posts: 2,949
Trader Rating: 33 (100%+)
Default

Originally posted by speedxl
eu chill will is corect.
what has a greater chance of tipping over
a . a lowered car or a raised car.
a lowered car has less traction under a slippery condition but the car that is stock hieght will roll more so it will achieve more wieght transfer to the outter wheels.
when the traction level is high you want the car to be planted less so there is less loss of corner speed . the ide is to find a compromise if you gain in one you loose in the other. good luck.

just experiment that is the only way you will fully understand.

Your confusing center of gravity and roll center. Yes, A high CG will give you more body roll. The roll center is the theoretical point at where body roll. The lower this point is, the more levarage the cg has to make the car roll in the corner, thus planting the tires. If the roll center is above the cg, it will make the car lean to the inside of the corner. However, this actually rolls away from the inside of the corner, causing loss of grip.
Jack Smash is offline  
Old 05-05-2004, 08:08 AM
  #14  
Tech Master
iTrader: (7)
 
c-lyon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Calgary
Posts: 1,751
Trader Rating: 7 (100%+)
Default

EUracer, there's a good discussion of this under the thread titled "RC Car action article wrong ???". The last post was April 24. You could also go to the article itself in the June issue of the mag. page 204.
c-lyon is offline  
Old 05-05-2004, 09:50 AM
  #15  
R/C Tech Elite Member
iTrader: (35)
 
RCBuddha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: SoCal
Posts: 1,982
Trader Rating: 35 (100%+)
Default

http://www.hpiracing.com/tuning/intro.htm

Either the above link or XXX-Main Chassis Tuning guide are good references for those who wanna learn tuning.

Sosidge has it right, but let me try to further clarify Roll Center:

The lower you have it, i.e. the higher you raise your inner camber links or raise your pivot blocks; the more chassis roll you'll have. This situation is better for low-grip situations, like unprepped asphalt.

The higher you have it, i.e, the lower you put the inner camber link position, or the closer you put your pivot blocks to the chassis,; the less chassis roll you'll have. This situation is better for high-grip situations, like carpet.

Manipulating only the roll center won't make your car dialed. You also have to consider shock angle, camber, tire grip, arm sweep, caster, and a host of other variables too long to list. Just remember to start with the box setup, and make each change, one at a time.
RCBuddha is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.