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  • Current, Resistance, Voltage and Power are related. Voltage times Current equals power, Voltage divided by Current equals Resistance.
    In the same manner Power equals (Current)^2 times Resistance, Power also equals (Voltage)^2 divided by Resistance.
    The Resistance in the wire is responsible for Electrical energy to be converted into heat. The higher the resistance, the more energy is being converted into heat.
  • hey guys! need your knowledge again
    is this a good chassis
    Speed Merchant 3
    i've never heard you guys mention it before and i know the revo 4 or whatever is the newer model.

    but i may get a hold of one 2nd hand cheap just to muck around while i get my 2nd TC sorted out.

    was hoping this car is good for asphalt tracks.

    also what sites are good for these kits for spares.

    all help is great appreciated so thanks in advance guys

    cheers
  • Quote:
    Originally posted by Pro ten Holland
    Current, Resistance, Voltage and Power are related. Voltage times Current equals power, Voltage divided by Current equals Resistance.
    In the same manner Power equals (Current)^2 times Resistance, Power also equals (Voltage)^2 divided by Resistance.
    The Resistance in the wire is responsible for Electrical energy to be converted into heat. The higher the resistance, the more energy is being converted into heat.
    all those are derivatives of ohm's law, but you stated power was the cause of the heat. and you are wrong. it is the resistance in the wire as you stated that is converted to heat that ultimately melts the wire. And ohm's law actually does not say very much in terms of electrical energy converted to heat energy. Ohm only states the relationship of current, resistance, and voltage.

    And to be completely acurate. when you apply ohm's law to this, you are not looking at the voltage a battery woudl put out, the v in the equation is the voltage drop in the wire itself. so you would take the P=VI as current applied to the wire by the voltage drop of the wire. not the voltage of the battery.


    sorry for the physics lesson guys, but I am a EE by education.
  • Quote:
    Originally posted by theisgroup
    all those are derivatives of ohm's law, but you stated power was the cause of the heat. and you are wrong. it is the resistance in the wire as you stated that is converted to heat that ultimately melts the wire. And ohm's law actually does not say very much in terms of electrical energy converted to heat energy. Ohm only states the relationship of current, resistance, and voltage.

    And to be completely acurate. when you apply ohm's law to this, you are not looking at the voltage a battery woudl put out, the v in the equation is the voltage drop in the wire itself. so you would take the P=VI as current applied to the wire by the voltage drop of the wire. not the voltage of the battery.


    sorry for the physics lesson guys, but I am a EE by education.
    Fast Guy + Smart Guy = YANG!
  • Quote:
    sorry for the physics lesson guys, but I am a EE by education.
    Are you another who got your degree and never did anything with it???? My wife is a Cooper Union graduate, she knows crap... I did mechanical and structural engineering, I always hated the electrical stuff...
  • yeah, BS in EE with a second major in Math and now I own a network consulting company and studying for the bar.
  • Sounds like my wife... Got her BS in EE, went on to make indie movies, got into 3D animation, ended up becoming a programmer and now she's the director of an IT dept....

    Mine's better... I stopped my schooling to become a cop.... I'm now retired and contemplating going back to do my masters in ME....
  • glad to hear I am not the only one that used the $50k+ of education to better my lives. lol

    Funny how school is soo much easier the second time around, huh?I have been taking some prep classes for the bar and just listening to the kids in the class is oo funny. I went and took the ethics test and a bunch of "kids" asked me what I was doing taking the test. All I could tell them was it was interesting and I though I would try my hand at being a lawyer. They told me I had to go to Law School and I asked them why?
  • So...is it reasonable (law school types will love that word) to use 16ga wire running 1/12th stock?
  • man you guys who actually got something out of school suck. LOL

    i tried my hand at college, i learned that i cant stay awake for more than 50 min(been in 3 accidents in the middle of the day cause i fell asleep, and countless close calls).

    schools not for me, wish it was, but i tried on maybe 3 differnt occasions to go back, and failed miserably each time, no matter how much coffee or sleep i get, im out like a light at the 25 min mark lol
  • Wire
    Wow! This finally got interesting...

    Thanks guys.
  • dr

    I use 16g in stock and mod 12th without a problem. If the ampacity of the wire was going to be a problem I thought it would probably get warm and so far not even close. I did do tests on the waire for voltage drop though and 12 gauge had half the voltage drop of 16 gauge. Just keep the wires as short as you can and you will be fine.

    Chris
  • So I
    Got a question on this heat/resistance thing.My understanding is it's the resistance of the wire to current flow which creates the heat/loss.I've also been told that as wire/conductors heat their resistive properties change.As they heat up they become more resistive,which I imagine would lead to a catch22 situation,to a point.This is why low impedance systems are used in signal transmission.True?any comments?Is this valid in the systems we use,ESC's and motors? Mario.
  • Man, all those smarts and no common sense. That is a heck of a package for you isn't it Yang.
  • common sense is over rated.

    yes you are right. it is a catch 22. that is where the fire starts. lol. the importance on this is that the temp delta will be approaching zero. what you would be calculating is as the temp changes the resistance goes up and as the resistance goes up the temp change. at some point hopefully the temp change will be close to zero and then the resistance will stablize. What you don't want to see is the the temp change never gets to zero before the flash point of the material.

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