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Tuning motors with brushes

Tuning motors with brushes

Old 03-26-2004, 03:43 PM
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I'm a believer in Blue Magic chrome polish. Mothers is also a good brand, but BM is the ticket in my book.
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Old 03-26-2004, 04:35 PM
  #32  
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Crest, Colgate is in there too. Makes for a good set of too
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Old 03-26-2004, 05:26 PM
  #33  
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Originally posted by trf racer
actually electrons dont flow they charge each other.
i suppose i should put my diode the other way round?so the positive side is on the negative?
lol.i think you fell asleep!


Electrons carries their own charge, which happens to be called "e". They are outside the core of the atom, check the drawing of an atom, the little particles that go round the core are the electrons (like the planets in the solar system). They can actually change atom if they are provided enough energy OR if the electron from another atom electron takes the place of one of them. This is the phenomen called electricity...

The poles were defined much before we knew that the electrons carried a negative charge. Indeed, they got it wrong and tought that the electrons being positive were going from the + to the -, where as they carry a negative charge they go in the opposite direction.

This is the reason why the speedo is between the motor and the + of the battery. If it was connected between the - and the motor, then the motor would spin (only a little) EVERY time you plug the battery in.


Anyway, it's fun to read some posts
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Old 03-26-2004, 05:28 PM
  #34  
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Originally posted by mafiaracers
Protons are posative elements and NEVER move. Electrons are negative elements and are the only part of an atom that moves.
Almost true, protons and neutrons, which are in the core, CAN move, it's called ATOMIC reaction.................
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Old 03-27-2004, 12:55 AM
  #35  
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Originally posted by Cobra81li200
Almost true, protons and neutrons, which are in the core, CAN move, it's called ATOMIC reaction.................
Don't try this at home folks....
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Old 03-27-2004, 01:31 AM
  #36  
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Originally posted by PitCrew
TRF

Man dude, do some investigation before you speak up.

Do you even know why the diod is on the motor???? I'll tell you later after you flounder a little.
well i was being sarcastic mate!!!
but i do no a little about schottky diodes and the history of them.
maker;Walter Schottky
DOB;23/7/1886.
Born;zurich,switzerland.
lived;germany.
his father Friedrich was a mathematician.
Walter studied physics at Humboldt university in berlin in 1904.
walter also created the ribbon mic and ribbon tweater used on high end hi-fi systems and he also created the reciver [super heterodyne reciever.
then he created a a metal semi conducter.ie an aluminium layer in intimate contact with an n-type silicone subtstrate].
this was named after its creator skottky.
skottky diodes are used in such devices as high frequancy,low noise mixers,switching circuits.
speed controlers are high frequancy switches ie there switching on and off at a certain frequancy and that frequancy effects punch,speed.
on all speedos that you can effect punch,power you are just altering the frequancy!
but the point of the skottky diode is that when the motor is free rolling its acting as a generator and sending charged electrons back to the speedo.this is electro magnetic force[emf].
to stop this a skottky diode is fitted.
also back emf can cause electrical noise which causes interference but the skottky diode stops emf.
is that enough or do you want to add more?
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Old 03-27-2004, 08:17 PM
  #37  
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Originally posted by Cain
what chrome polish do you recommend pops? I am thinking of trying this with my stock motors since it sounds alot easier that the other methods that I heard of.

So basically summing it up, you put some chrome polish ( how much? ) on the shaft, the bushing ( inside and bottom racing the comm? ) and run the motor for 40 seconds on X ( how much? ) volts and it will do the polishing for you?

Thanks!
cain;

I'm using 'Turtle Wax' Chrome Polish (from an Auto store). I always disassemble and inspect a new motor anyways, just use a tiny dab on the shaft (where the shims sit) at each end then re-assemble the Motor.

While breaking in the Motor, gently work the shaft back and forth to spread the Polish around. Run it for a minute or two, then disassemble and clean out the motor.

Guys;

Some Toothpastes are VERY abrasive, so be careful there.
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Old 03-27-2004, 10:03 PM
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Default Reaming bushings

Pops,

How do you go about reaming bushings on stock motors?

Thanks.
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Old 03-28-2004, 01:44 AM
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Default Re: Reaming bushings

Originally posted by XXX-S Bill
Pops,

How do you go about reaming bushings on stock motors?

Thanks.
With a long reamer...
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Old 03-28-2004, 06:53 PM
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Angry Bushings???

I didnt know motors had bushings . I dont think its a very smart idea to use sandpaper on any part of the motor, expecially on the commutator. The comm is saposed to be perfectly round .
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Old 03-28-2004, 07:51 PM
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Default Re: Re: Reaming bushings

Originally posted by James Nguyen
With a long reamer...
James,

Hmmmmmmmmmmm...Haven't got a clue what a "long reamer" means. Is there a specific tool for this?

Do I want to ream the holes to a point where the shaft only makes contact with something like half of the bushing's depth?
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Old 03-28-2004, 08:26 PM
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.125 is the size of the reamer that you will need if I remember correctly. What he means by long is the length of the reamer. that way it simulates the arm in the motor and goes through both bushings.
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Old 03-28-2004, 08:30 PM
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yes, .125" or 1/8th inch. make sure you measure the diameter of your motor shaft to make sure it is close to 1/8th inch. you could just polish your shafts and bushings also.
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Old 03-28-2004, 09:25 PM
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Thanks Kraig and James.

Got any ideas on where I can find a .125" reamer. Obviously seen drill bits; but not "reamers".

FYI...I have placed the shaft of my Trinity hood alignment tool through the bearings on all my motors before and noticed that it didn't turn as freely in some; so, I think this could be a fairly important performance issue.

Thanks.

UPDATE:

Ah ha! Found the facts about reamers at Tri-Angle Precision and now realize they comes with flutes in "straight", "RH" and "LH" designs. And is exact enough to come in .124", .125" and .126" sizing. Gonna go with the straight flute version of the .125". Just gotta double check the size of the shaft before ordering. That settles it...Thanks again...Learn something every day...

Last edited by JRX-S Bill; 03-29-2004 at 06:51 AM.
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Old 03-29-2004, 07:05 AM
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So everybody knows...Pay attention to 'hand reaming' for our purposes.

REAMING
Reaming a drilled hole is another operation that can be performed on a drilling machine. It is difficult, if not impossible, to drill a hole to an exact standard diameter. When great accuracy is required, the holes are first drilled slightly undersized and then reamed to size. Reaming can be done on a drilling machine by using a hand reamer or using a machine reamer. When you must drill and ream a hole, it is best if the setup is not changed. For example, drill the hole (slightly undersized) and then ream the hole before moving to another hole. This method will ensure that the reamer is accurately aligned over the hole. If a previously drilled hole must be reamed, it must be accurately realigned under the machine spindle. Most hand and machine reamers have a slight chamfer at the tip to aid in alignment and starting.


REAMER


REAMERS are precision cutting tools used to enlarge existing holes smoothly and accurately by removing a small amount of metal. Reamer geometry varies widely, having four or more flutes, spiral or straight, and left or right hand cut.

Applications REAMERS are used to rough or finish ream predrilled, punched, or diecast cavities for improved size, roundness, straightness, and surface finish. Though straight flute reamers are still popular, there are many advantages to spiral flute construction. Particularly in smaller sizes, spiral flute reamers can be manufactured more accurately and result in a considerable cost savings.

Limitations REAMER limitations depend upon tolerances and finish desired, amount and distibution of stock, and type of material being cut. Feeds and speeds are critical.

Hand Reamers
Solid hand reamers should be used when a greater accuracy in hole size is required. The cutting action of a hand reamer is performed on the taper (approximately 0.015 per inch) which extends 3/8-to 1/2-inch above the chamfer. This slight taper limits the stock allowance, or metal to be removed by the reamer, from 0.001- to 0.003-inch depending on the size of the reamer. The chamfer aids in aligning and starting the tool, and reamers usually have straight shanks and a square end to fit into an adjustable tap and reamer wrench. A hand reamer should never be chucked into a machine spindle for power reaming. A center may be installed in the drilling machine spindle to align and center the hand reamer. As the reamer is turned by hand into the hole, only a slight pressure is applied to the hand feed lever to keep the center in contact with the reamer and maintain accuracy in alignment.

Machine Reamer
Machine reamers can generally be expected to produce good clean holes if used properly. The cutting action of a machine reamer is performed on the chamfer and it will remove small amounts of material. The allowance for machine reamers is generally 1/64 inch for reamers l/2-inch to 1 inch in diameter, a lesser amount for smaller holes, and greater than 1/64-inch for holes over 1 inch. Machine reamers for use on drilling machines or lathes have taper shanks to fit the machine spindle or straight shanks for inserting into a drill chuck. A reamer must run straight and true to produce a smooth finish. The proper cutting fluid for the metal being cut should be used. Generally, the speed used for machine reaming would be approximately one-half that used for the same size drill.

Reamers are made of either carbon tool steel or high speed steel. The cutting blades of a high speed steel reamer lose their original keenness sooner than those of a carbon steel reamer; however, after the first super keenness is gone, they are still serviceable. The high speed reamer usually lasts much longer than the carbon steel type.

Reamer blades are hardened to the point of being brittle and must be handled carefully to avoid chipping them. When reaming a hole, rotate the reamer in the cutting direction only. Turn the reamer steadily and evenly to prevent chattering, or marking and scoring of the hole walls.

Reamers are available in any standard size. The straight fluted reamer is less expensive than the spiral fluted reamer, but the spiral type has less tendency to chatter. Both types are tapered for a short distance back of the end to aid in starting. Bottoming reamers have no taper and are used to complete the reaming of blind holes.

For general use, an expansion reamer is the most practical. This type is furnished in standard sizes from 1/4 inch to 1 inch, increasing in diameter by 1/32 inch increments.

Taper reamers, both hand and machine operated, are used to smooth and true tapered holes and recesses.
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