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Old 03-25-2004, 09:14 AM   #16
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It felt flat because you took away the part of the brush that supplies the majority of the power. Current flows around the outside of anything. On a brush, it flows directly across the furthest edges of the face. When you shave those away, the current has to find a new path, this new path will cause the motor to feel a little soft. In Mod racing, this is great because the brush will seat itself much quicker and you'll notice the effects much sooner and they will be far more prevelant.

-Chris Woods
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Old 03-25-2004, 10:17 AM   #17
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I think thats why motors feel best when there are still slight serrations on the brush. Because the electrons flow over the outside, there are more paths for the electricity to take.
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Old 03-25-2004, 12:57 PM   #18
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i would have to say that it feels better with fresh serrations cuz of the surface area meaning less surface area will poush the brushes into the comm harder basically a generic way of a stiffer spring
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Old 03-25-2004, 01:02 PM   #19
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I am reffering to the condition of the brush where its broken in, as in it is countored to the comm, but there are still valleys of serrations left. Probably a negligable difference in pressure per square inch. But that could be it. Why not then does the motor perform on the track that way with a stiffer spring.
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Old 03-25-2004, 03:33 PM   #20
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how do you guys 'tune' your bushings, i heard polishing them will help, is this rite? and wot else can i do

Cheers

Stew
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Old 03-25-2004, 06:41 PM   #21
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KMMMMM....Silver brushes wear down faster than copper ones for all you rookies who didnt know. CATS
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Old 03-25-2004, 06:46 PM   #22
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It helps to spray "power shot" (motor cleaner) on to your comm every few runs before you run your car, it will help you brushes last longer. You can get these kinds of cleaners at: www.towerhobbies.com
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Old 03-25-2004, 07:03 PM   #23
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Bushings are the most important part of a fast stock motor. The freeier you can get the arm to spin, the faster and cooler it will run.

Take the bushings out of the motor with a nail punch-out. Take 800 grit sandpaper and roll it up small enough to fit into the bushing hole. Put one end of the sandpaper into a drill and spin it for a minute or so. Then spray it out very well. Next, take some 2000 grit sandpaper and do the same thing as the 800. Then spray it out very will. Next, take "Blue Magic" chrome polish and put it on a q-tip...a ton of it. Insert it as well as possible into the bushing and chuck the other end into the drill and set it spin for about 30 seconds. It will turn very black. Repeat this process until it is no longer black. Spray out the bushing after every time with the blue magic. Now the bushings are like bearings.

Next, take one of the motor shafts and polish it. Take the 800 grit and while holding the arm in your hand, turn it. The shaft will become very "not shiny" and the sandpaper will have silver on it. Spray it out. Next take the 2000 grit and do the same thing. Spray it out. Lastly, dip the arm shaft into the blue magic and take an old while t-shirt and spin it in the same fassion as you did with the shaft. The shirt will turn very black like the bushings. Spray it out very well.

The key is to take your time, this is generally a very long process and if done right, your motor will run like its using bearings. Good Luck!

-Chris Woods
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Old 03-25-2004, 07:18 PM   #24
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Guys;

Really there becomes a point of diminishing returns for all of this and I surely would NOT recommend using Sandpaper (even 800 grit) inside the Bushings.

All that is needed is some Chrome Polish on the Armature Shaft and Bushings the first time you break the Motor in (You're going to disassemble the Motor ANYWAYS). The normal contact of the Metal parts coupled with the Polish, will do the Job.
Afterwards, disassemble and flush everything out with Motor spray.
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Old 03-25-2004, 07:22 PM   #25
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Yeah Pops I agree...

I used toothpaste and an armature shaft for about 30-40 seconds and it made my bushes too loose on the armature, motor runs far less efficiently.

I have found there to be a difference polishing the armature shaft and also polishing the face of the bushing. You are far more likely to get good power from the right set of brushes and springs etc.
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Old 03-25-2004, 07:39 PM   #26
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http://www.coalitionforums.com/Trailingedge.gif

Trailing edge diagram.
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Old 03-26-2004, 02:36 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally posted by PitCrew
NO. Electricity FLOWS FROM negative TO positive. You fall asleep in science class?

And he is correct about the spring tension, but he had the wrong description of why it is that way.

You ever hear about how they plate parts with say...cadnium? They hook the anode to the part (thats positive) and they use the cathode to apply the material (cathode is negative) The electricity flows from negative to positive, carrying with it particles of cadnium, adhereing them to the part.

Same with the brushes. If the brushes didn't wear out due to friction, the brush on the positive terminal would eventually be covered with copper because the electricity is pulling the material from the comm, trying to deposit it onto the positive brush.

Please, ask anybody that acctually knows something about electricity. negative to positive.

actually electrons dont flow they charge each other.
i suppose i should put my diode the other way round?so the positive side is on the negative?
lol.i think you fell asleep!
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Old 03-26-2004, 08:46 AM   #28
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Protons are posative elements and NEVER move. Electrons are negative elements and are the only part of an atom that moves.
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Old 03-26-2004, 11:18 AM   #29
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TRF

Man dude, do some investigation before you speak up.

Do you even know why the diod is on the motor???? I'll tell you later after you flounder a little.
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Old 03-26-2004, 11:43 AM   #30
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what chrome polish do you recommend pops? I am thinking of trying this with my stock motors since it sounds alot easier that the other methods that I heard of.

So basically summing it up, you put some chrome polish ( how much? ) on the shaft, the bushing ( inside and bottom racing the comm? ) and run the motor for 40 seconds on X ( how much? ) volts and it will do the polishing for you?


Thanks!
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