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Old 03-13-2004, 04:30 AM   #1
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Default soldering iron help!

does a 50-60 watt soldering iron enough for building a pack? tnx

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Old 03-13-2004, 05:08 AM   #2
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Yes, that is perfect. Try and get the 60-watt.
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Old 03-13-2004, 07:48 AM   #3
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As long as it has a fat chizel tip it will work fine.
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Old 03-13-2004, 10:17 AM   #4
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Try getting a variable rate one. . . . It'll work good for wiring and building packs, 40w is all I use to build packs, too hot will damage the batteries.
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Old 03-13-2004, 03:57 PM   #5
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Default Thanks for all the replies

I'm going to pick up one tonight. Will post pics

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Old 03-13-2004, 04:29 PM   #6
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I always use gas soldering iron for packs. I have great one named Steinel 1300, it is supposed to be equelant of over 130 watts. I use 6 mm wide chisel point on it. When it's fully warm it takes only a second touch to melt the solder on the battery and batterybar.
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Old 03-13-2004, 04:42 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally posted by andsetinn
I always use gas soldering iron for packs. I have great one named Steinel 1300, it is supposed to be equelant of over 130 watts. I use 6 mm wide chisel point on it. When it's fully warm it takes only a second touch to melt the solder on the battery and batterybar.
..are you suggesting that I should not use a solder below 100 watts to build packs? The one that I saw was really sweet! digital blue backlit with face bigger than the GFX and most of all - price is a fraction compared to a Hakko's but doesn't have a rating over 60 W though

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Last edited by centax error!; 03-14-2004 at 12:31 AM.
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Old 03-13-2004, 06:42 PM   #8
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60W is more than enough to solder packs....

The Hakko 936 is rated at 60W, CSI is a 40W station.

Here is a quick test I did with the CSI & Hakko


http://www.mpja.com/allpictspl.asp?d...oduct=15140+TL




************************************************
Quick break down of some basic test.
..............................Hakko CSI
cold to Low Temp. 16sec 21sec

From Low temp to MAX 37sec 47sec

I was able to solder a 6 cell pack with no problem using the CSI.


At less than half the cost of my Hakko, I would have no problem using the CSI iron in my pit....

Small differences between the 2
DIN cable, male vs. female(see pic)
LED
Soldering iron cord length is shorter by about 8" on the CSI
CSI also included extra heating element

How long will the CSI last?????


***My Hakko has the 908 iron instead of the standard 907***
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Last edited by Tres; 07-10-2008 at 03:23 PM.
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Old 03-13-2004, 08:23 PM   #9
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I just bought a new Hakko 936-9 (white) What tempature do you all suggest I set it at while building batterys? Any ideas on tips? Let me know. Thanks!
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Old 03-14-2004, 09:05 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally posted by pro4x
I just bought a new Hakko 936-9 (white) What tempature do you all suggest I set it at while building batterys? Any ideas on tips? Let me know. Thanks!
800 deg. sounds good.
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Old 03-14-2004, 09:25 PM   #11
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A hot iron will damage cells if left on too long. Heat hurts cells, so if you use an iron that is hot like a Hako and crank it up, it will only be on for a second and the metal will liquify and make a good bond. With a cheaper/lower heat iron, you have to keep the heatr on it longer and it may not liquify as well and the longer contact will penetrate the cell more. Quick and fast is the game.
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Old 03-14-2004, 09:35 PM   #12
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many people say not to use flux when soldering electric stuff....well i beg to differ, ive used acid flux for years in electric stuff and as long as you remove the residue and cleam the batteries very well with something the acid wont hurt anything. It will also help very much on the solder flow and melting it quicker with less time the heat is on the battery. As for soldering irons i use a bluepoint model that comes of the snap on truck...about 160 bucks it works very well and will solder anything you need!!
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Old 03-14-2004, 10:53 PM   #13
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Acid flux is good, its just that you have to scrach/grind off the residue, it gives are really good and strong bond.
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Old 03-15-2004, 01:38 AM   #14
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i use a 80w, and try to work as fast as possible.
It take a sec or 2 to melt the solder.
I use a dremel to scratch the surface of the battery before working, it help to have a good bond.
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Old 03-15-2004, 04:24 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally posted by edseb
A hot iron will damage cells if left on too long. Heat hurts cells, so if you use an iron that is hot like a Hako and crank it up, it will only be on for a second and the metal will liquify and make a good bond. With a cheaper/lower heat iron, you have to keep the heatr on it longer and it may not liquify as well and the longer contact will penetrate the cell more. Quick and fast is the game.
Exactly what I've been told over and over again and has never failed me....
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