R/C Tech Forums

Go Back   R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Electric On-Road

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-08-2009, 12:29 PM   #31
Tech Initiate
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 30
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fatkid24 View Post
What, nobody runs Pro-E?

Sorry just ha to throw in my choice.
Real cad tools are for the big boys...

Seriously though, if your doing complex design and want the best possible tool to create manufacturable components, Pro-E is best. There is a reason large companys (Toyota, CAT, Microsoft) use it for design.

For general use though, its hard to beat Inventor/Solidworks. Each has its limits compared to Pro-E, but for someone designing non complex parts and assemblies it might not be an issue.
Attached Thumbnails
What's a good CAD program to do general design RC?-pro-e1.jpg  
Tristar Racing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 01:00 PM   #32
Tech Elite
 
Nipple's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Kallang Airport
Posts: 2,031
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tristar Racing View Post
Real cad tools are for the big boys...

Seriously though, if your doing complex design and want the best possible tool to create manufacturable components, Pro-E is best. There is a reason large companys (Toyota, CAT, Microsoft) use it for design.

For general use though, its hard to beat Inventor/Solidworks. Each has its limits compared to Pro-E, but for someone designing non complex parts and assemblies it might not be an issue.
I agree on "manufacturablity" or cost of fabricating the parts. I think Solidworks is a great CAD software to do freeform modelling of fantastic looking parts. But to fabricate what you modelled is another story.

I personally use UGS NX at work (occasionally model and fabricate some RC parts for personal use ) and mainly use solid modelling features. But it is a very expensive CAD software.
Nipple is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 01:13 PM   #33
Tech Master
 
DS Motorsport's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 1,440
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tristar Racing View Post
Real cad tools are for the big boys...

Seriously though, if your doing complex design and want the best possible tool to create manufacturable components, Pro-E is best. There is a reason large companys (Toyota, CAT, Microsoft) use it for design.

For general use though, its hard to beat Inventor/Solidworks. Each has its limits compared to Pro-E, but for someone designing non complex parts and assemblies it might not be an issue.
Could you explain that a bit more, or show things made with Pro-E which are very hard or impossible with Inventor/Solidworks.

I'm just curious.

But everybody has a personal favorite, i think you can't say that one piece of software is the best.

For the topicstarter:

Maybe it's a possibility to have a student buy you a student version of solidworks?.
The only thing you need is a student pass is most cases.
For me it's even possible to get an unlimited amount of licenses, all for free.
__________________
P1-RC.com
DS Motorsport is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 01:24 PM   #34
Tech Initiate
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 30
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nipple View Post
I agree on "manufacturablity" or cost of fabricating the parts. I think Solidworks is a great CAD software to do freeform modelling of fantastic looking parts. But to fabricate what you modelled is another story.

I personally use UGS NX at work (occasionally model and fabricate some RC parts for personal use ) and mainly use solid modelling features. But it is a very expensive CAD software.
UG is another good top level solution, although the company seems to get sold every other year...

Quote:
Originally Posted by DS Motorsport View Post
Could you explain that a bit more, or show things made with Pro-E which are very hard or impossible with Inventor/Solidworks.

I'm just curious.

But everybody has a personal favorite, i think you can't say that one piece of software is the best.

For the topicstarter:

Maybe it's a possibility to have a student buy you a student version of solidworks?.
The only thing you need is a student pass is most cases.
For me it's even possible to get an unlimited amount of licenses, all for free.
Anything with a large parts count or large complexity is going to struggle on Inventor/Solidworks, especially Inventor. There is a reason Autodesk and SW spec 64 bit machines for their recommendations to run their software. Complex molds seem to be another area that Pro-E is vastly superior in both speed and capability. If you want to see parts/assemblies that are designed in Pro-E but would be taxing to Solidworks/Inventor, just open the hood of any recent Toyota vehicle to look at the powertrain. Or if you have a chance, Ferrari's road going and racing vehicles. If a company is going to use Dassault products for complex automotive designs, its going to be Catia not Solidworks. Analysis is another area that Pro-E distances itself, especially in the mechanism dynamics and FEA arenas.

Like I said Solidworks/Inventor are not bad tools, but they are limited. Solidworks has a great marketing team though and seems to have severly devout followers/users. I prefer to use the tools that allow me to get my job done correctly, and not get caught up in the cad world's "Ford vs Chevy" battle. Solidworks seems to lend itself to first-time 3d designers, and is a good starting point if you can get it for cheap. Keep in mind the student version of Pro-E is also $100.

Last edited by Tristar Racing; 12-08-2009 at 01:36 PM.
Tristar Racing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 03:50 PM   #35
Tech Master
 
jag88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 1,075
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

Which of these programs has surface capability. Let say you wanted to surface a hood or fender and then cut sections.
Thanks.
jag88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 03:59 PM   #36
Tech Initiate
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 30
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jag88 View Post
Which of these programs has surface capability. Let say you wanted to surface a hood or fender and then cut sections.
Thanks.
All of the cad packages have surfacing capabilities. Some work better than others. I think catia is still the best for surfacing, and many that have used pro-e and solidworks agree creating manufacurable surfaces is easier in pro-e.

The debate then becomes dependant on if you want to do geometric surfacing, or free form. Free form is best thought of like shaping clay. No geometry defines it, it's more or less esthetically molded. Moen, Microsoft, and others use ISDX in pro-e for it's free form capabilities.
Tristar Racing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 05:31 PM   #37
Tech Master
 
DS Motorsport's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 1,440
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

Tristan racing, thanks for your clear explanation.
When I have the time I will try Pro-E, I think my school has a license for it.

But for now Solidworks has everything I need. Mostly working on one-off prototypes which are made out of less then 1000 parts.
__________________
P1-RC.com
DS Motorsport is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 05:42 PM   #38
Tech Master
 
Troy Mckune's Avatar
R/C Tech Elite Subscriber
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 1,690
Trader Rating: 38 (100%+)
Default

Pro E and Catia and others are superior to Solidworks. If this was a discussion of what program to use to design the next Boeing aircraft or automobile Solidworks would not even be considered. For designing RC cars and assemblies that are not made up of 100,000 parts Solidworks is a great relatively low cost solution.

Another thing to consider is modeling in 3d is great but has some limitations. For example when I design something I like to layout things in 2d (acad lt) and get some hard points between parts down before I start modeling. Having some basic idea of what parts will look like and placement relative to others can save a lot of time modeling. Also, like the last chassis I designed I laid it out, copied it made some changes, and again, and again. I probably had 10 different versions on the screen next to each other and compared what I liked and disliked about each. Finally settling on what liked the best before I brought it into Solidworks and made it 3d. If I had done this in Solidworks to begin with it would have taken a lot more time.

If you are new to CAD it would not hurt to start with some of the free 2d CAD programs out there and get your feet wet first before diving in.

Good luck,

Troy
__________________
Mckune Design / facebook page / RC America / XRAY / Lunsford Racing
Mckune Design is a custom manufacturer of CNC machined carbon fiber, G10, & composite laminate parts for RC, Aerospace, medical, and high tech industries.
Troy Mckune is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 06:15 PM   #39
Tech Elite
 
SammyZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New England
Posts: 3,045
Trader Rating: 138 (100%+)
Default

paper & pen
__________________
Hotbodies USA
SweepRacing USA
SammyZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2009, 12:04 AM   #40
Tech Addict
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Central PA
Posts: 549
Trader Rating: 20 (92%+)
Default

Hey guys I have a ?, I don't think it is too far off topic and don't know where to post a thread for it if I did anyway so here goes...

What are most of you guys employeed as... I am 20 years old and have some college under my belt but due to an unfortunate string of events I I have decided to start a diffrent path.

With my intrest in RC and the fact that I love Designing, building, testing, problem solving, and love math and physics I have decided that Mechanical engineering would be an awsome choice for me... I an 20 years old and already feel like I am starting late but mostly because I had a plan for everything before and that got screwed up...

So what are you guys employeed as? Is engineering really what I am thinking it is? I know most jobs wont be with awsome projects that I am extreamly pu mped up to do but still, It will open up those options after I get some time under my belt in the field right? And I know it is such a brouad field that It might be hard to answer but any response is appreciated....
RyeRey521 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2009, 01:59 AM   #41
Tech Elite
 
tom_chang79's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Southern California
Posts: 2,591
Trader Rating: 13 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by iPearl View Post
AutoCAD PC
AutoDesk PC For a render
TurboCAD Pro MAC
Yuck, yuck, and yuck.

Pro-E, UGS, Solidworks...

Honestly though, just do it and test it. You can do all the FEA on the part after it's done, but there's no simulator that will tell you whether your RC is crap or something really good...

__________________
RIP TAP RC
tom_chang79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2009, 02:04 AM   #42
Tech Elite
 
tom_chang79's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Southern California
Posts: 2,591
Trader Rating: 13 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RyeRey521 View Post
I an 20 years old and already feel like I am starting late but mostly because I had a plan for everything before and that got screwed up...
It's not that late. The average time for someone who is working AND going to school for an Engineering degree is 10 years... So many fresh grads who were working full time after high school are in their late 20s, early 30s...

You ask a very very broad question. Since Engineering is integrated into so many industries, it's hard to say.

But in general, there are two categories:

Designers and Administrative.


99% of Engineers in the real world are adminstrators. Technical paper-pushers. They simply check things off, compare numbers, format spread sheets, the seriously boring stuff (but needs to be done, I'm not putting any importance in the description).

1% of Engineers are designers. This is the fun part of Engineering. You're usually allowed the freedom (assuming you don't end up working for a-holes) to tackle a problem with the best way you know how. Test it, and sometimes improve on it or release a product...


Unfortunately, 100% of Engineers in college are taught and under the impression of becoming a DESIGN engineer. 99 out of 100 Engineering graduates find out otherwise and some will get burnt out of their field because paper pushing is not very fun...
__________________
RIP TAP RC
tom_chang79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2009, 02:25 AM   #43
Tech Addict
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Central PA
Posts: 549
Trader Rating: 20 (92%+)
Default

Thanks for the responce Tom... I figured with the broad spectrum of the career that a specific answer would be hard to come by but what you said helps... I figured most of the jobs are paper pushers but if that's what it takes till you find a design job you like an enjoy and you get paid well during the whole process then that's something I'd be willing to do... I like the idea of working with a team to come to a final design, answer, problem, or whatever you know? And have the satisfaction after the fact that you did something no matter if your designing a brand new rc car or a toilet paper dispenser lol...

How about if I had a minor in electrical engineering would that help with getting the design positions? And what are the internships like for up and comming grads? Is it just b**** work or does it really help show you and get you involved in an engineerers daily work life.... Sry to be throwing all of these ?'s at you but you seem to know what you talking about
RyeRey521 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2009, 06:32 AM   #44
Tech Master
 
DS Motorsport's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: The Netherlands
Posts: 1,440
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RyeRey521 View Post
Hey guys I have a ?, I don't think it is too far off topic and don't know where to post a thread for it if I did anyway so here goes...

What are most of you guys employeed as... I am 20 years old and have some college under my belt but due to an unfortunate string of events I I have decided to start a diffrent path.

With my intrest in RC and the fact that I love Designing, building, testing, problem solving, and love math and physics I have decided that Mechanical engineering would be an awsome choice for me... I an 20 years old and already feel like I am starting late but mostly because I had a plan for everything before and that got screwed up...

So what are you guys employeed as? Is engineering really what I am thinking it is? I know most jobs wont be with awsome projects that I am extreamly pu mped up to do but still, It will open up those options after I get some time under my belt in the field right? And I know it is such a brouad field that It might be hard to answer but any response is appreciated....
Well, I am currently 21 and i'm in my second year of automotive/mechanical engineering. Most of my classmates are around the same age so I wouldn't say it is too late to start a study.

For the internship I think it really depends on you. If you really take the time to find a good company you can learn a lot.
For instance, i have had a internship at a Formula 3 racing team. I did the setups of the cars, simulation with Matlab/Simulink and a.d.a.m.s.
It was a great experience and learned a lot.
And with the current economy it is better to be at school then trying to find some shitty job.
__________________
P1-RC.com
DS Motorsport is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-09-2009, 07:19 AM   #45
Tech Elite
 
RCknight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 2,273
Trader Rating: 5 (100%+)
Default Ok I think I'll try Inventor...

maybe it's best I play with 2d applications first, work on a model and later work on a 3d model of it. What version of Inventor is worth buying that's in the $100+ range? I saw a version of it in Staples for $100.00. If I'm able to catch on to this then maybe later I'll spend more on a program.

Last edited by RCknight; 12-09-2009 at 08:17 AM.
RCknight is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. It is currently 06:53 PM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
Powered By: vBulletin v3.9.2.1
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Advertise Content © 2001-2011 RCTech.net