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Inner Diameter of Associated Sedan Springs

Inner Diameter of Associated Sedan Springs

Old 11-16-2009, 12:32 PM
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Default Inner Diameter of Associated Sedan Springs

What is the common inner diameter of the associated touring car springs? Trying to see if these would work on different brand of vehicle I have.
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Old 11-16-2009, 03:42 PM
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Measured 3 sets of my associated springs and they vary between 13.2mm and 13.3mm
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Old 11-16-2009, 04:07 PM
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big thanks. One other thing if you don't mind, can you tell me the thickness of the springs and the related color / weight?
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Old 11-17-2009, 02:28 PM
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Green: 12lbs
Silver: 14lbs
Blue: 17lbs
Gold: 19.5lbs
Red: 22lbs
Copper: 25lbs
Purple:30lbs
Yellow: 35lbs
White: 40lbs

These are the ratings that are on the spring chart that comes with sets of TC3 springs.
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Old 11-17-2009, 07:13 PM
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yes, but what I am wondering is how the thickness of the spring corresponds to its rating. I have some springs here that are non- Ae that I am curious to compare as much as possible and I was advised to look at the spring thickness as an option.
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Old 11-18-2009, 07:54 AM
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If your unknown springs are about the same length as the associated springs, you can do a simple test. Put the unknown spring and the associated spring on top of each other, and squeeze them together, the one which compresses fully first is the softer. Could give you a rough idea how hard or soft they are compared to some known springs.

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Neal
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