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Old 07-11-2009, 08:33 AM   #1
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Default Tamiya shock oil wt?

Hello,

Was just hoping someone could help me with Tamiya shock oil wt.

What would be the equal of 50wt in Tamiya standards?

It seems Tamiya has a different way of categorising everything (like they do with pinions).

I m after 50wt shock oil, would any of these
(http://i21.ebayimg.com/04/i/001/3e/ac/a375_1.JPG) be it?

Thanks.
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Old 07-11-2009, 12:39 PM   #2
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wt or weight is not a proper way of measuring oil viscosity. Every manufacturer has a different scale when derriving their "weight", so Assoc 50wt is different to Losi 50wt etc. There is another good thread somewhere on here that discusses this.
Tamiya is one of the few manufacturers whose oil is based on the system that is actually internationally recognised when measuring fluid viscosity, centi stokes ("cs" or "cts" for short).
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Old 07-11-2009, 03:13 PM   #3
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It's best to stick with one brand of oil, and move through their range as required. So either run all Tamiya oil, or all AE oil (for example)

Some might say that Tamiya #500 is roughly equivalent to a 50wt oil... but I wouldn't stake my house on it.

Personally I use the Much-More oil which is also measured in cts and is also available in finer #50 steps, not the #100 steps of the Tamiya oil.
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Old 07-11-2009, 07:49 PM   #4
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Cool,

I've just been advised that I should try a harder oil, around about 50wt or so.

I wasnt really sure what I was doing so I got this Tamiya pack that comes with #800, #900, and #1000. Sounds to me like I got way over the top, but it's OK, always good to have spare stuff I may need it later.

Do you guys know what weight the kit Tamiya Damper Oil is?

I just want a slight more roll when I m taking a corner and it feel like the current setup is slightly too stiff.
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Old 07-11-2009, 08:26 PM   #5
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AE 50wt is roughly 650 CST. The wt to CST conversion is not linear and more importantly as posted previously the wt reference really varies among the different producers. CST is one standard is the same between Tamiya/Much More/XRay.
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Old 07-12-2009, 03:11 AM   #6
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I'll give the #800 a try and see how I go.

the track I race on is pretty rough concrete, I should be using a harder suspension right?

To my understanding, the higher the surface grip, the softer the shocks should be?
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Old 07-12-2009, 03:12 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnd_tang View Post
Cool,

I've just been advised that I should try a harder oil, around about 50wt or so.

I wasnt really sure what I was doing so I got this Tamiya pack that comes with #800, #900, and #1000. Sounds to me like I got way over the top, but it's OK, always good to have spare stuff I may need it later.

Do you guys know what weight the kit Tamiya Damper Oil is?

I just want a slight more roll when I m taking a corner and it feel like the current setup is slightly too stiff.
Tamiya generally supply one of two oils in the kits. The Yellow oil is #400, the clear oil is #900.

I think you are unlikely to use the #800+ oils unless you are using the Tamiya CVA plastic shocks (which have useless pistons so need the heavy oils to have any damping at all).

If you are already using the Tamiya oils, I would try and keep using them for the time being, you should be able to get a satisfactory setup with them.

By the way, with "stiffness", heavier damping just affects the rate of change of the suspension movement, the overall stiffness is dictated by the springs. If the car feels lazy, it may be over damped. If the car lacks mid-corner grip, it may be sprung too stiffly.
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Old 07-12-2009, 05:01 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sosidge View Post
Some might say that Tamiya #500 is roughly equivalent to a 50wt oil... but I wouldn't stake my house on it.
This is how I've always seen it explained: Tamiya just added a zero to all weights, so #100 is 10Wt, #200 is 20Wt, etc.
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Old 07-12-2009, 05:33 AM   #9
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That's easy enough.

Thanks Thomas_H.
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