R/C Tech Forums

Go Back   R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Electric On-Road

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-05-2004, 09:26 AM   #1
Tech Initiate
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Denver
Posts: 27
Default Battery Pack Soldering

I want to try soldering my own packs - save a few$$ - my Primary Sponsor (wife) would appreciate it.

I know it's possible to totally screw up a pack while soldering.

I also know it's possible to put a bad/useless pack together.

So If I'm gonna do this, can anyone offer any guidance? Soldering, matching howto's? Suggested equipment?

Thanks

</chaz>
theChaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2004, 09:55 AM   #2
Tech Fanatic
 
kt racing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: va
Posts: 848
Send a message via AIM to kt racing
Default

As far as the soldering goes. You need a hot soldering iron probably atleast a 60w. Also buy a battery jig. This will help you in building the batteries. Any of the battery bars will work doesn't really matter. Then clean the surface of the battery. put a little solder on the battery then the bar. The big thing is not to have the soldering iron on the cell for a long period of time. Because you could damage it. The is why you use a hot soldering iron. It doesn't take a whole lot of solder to mount the battery bars. Don't go crazy with it in another word. You can also use shoe goo to glue the cells together. it will help keep the battery bars from bending when you crash.
As far as the matching thing goes. I would leave that up to the pro's. it takes thousands of dollars to get all of the equipment to match cells right. So just buy your cells and put them together.
hope that helps.
kt racing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2004, 10:37 AM   #3
Tech Master
 
koabich's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Detroit Area
Posts: 1,359
Send a message via Yahoo to koabich
Default

I agree with KT. It will take a lot of money and time to be able to match your batteries. And in most cases your cells will not be as good as those from a good matcher. It would just be easier to buy cells already matched. You will know the quality of the cells and the numbers. You woun't have to buy a hundred cells to be able to assemble several good packs.
To assemble the cells, I would first recommend you purchase a good soldering iron and the Deans solder jig. You want to make sure that you do not rest the hot iron on the cells for too long exposing them to too much heat. If you want to take care of your cells and the matchers label on them I would buy the protective heat shrink wrap and wrap each cell. I take a dremel (sandpaper will work fine) and scuff up the ends of the cells so the solder has something to suck into and hold onto.
I do not presolder the cell of the bar. I feel this process uses too much solder and doesn't give you as good of a connection. Place the cells in the jig, heat your iron to as hot as it will go and place a bar onto the top of the cell you with to solder.
Place the tip of the iron on the battery bar and hold the solder to the side of the battery bar. The solder will melt around the bar and provide the best conductive joint. Only use enough solder to hold the joint together. Once mastered this method will allow your cells to perform at their best and look professionally assembled.
Hope this helps!
Joe
koabich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2004, 10:51 AM   #4
Tech Elite
 
EddieO's Avatar
R/C Tech Charter Subscriber
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,414
Trader Rating: 6 (100%+)
Default

Pretty straight forward.

Get a GOOD soldering Iron, easily worth the $100 for a good Hakko. Get one from a Hobby shop though.....stay away from soldering irons from hardware stores. I am sure one of the dealers on RCtech could get you a good iron at a good price.

Next, get a GOOD battery jig. So far, the Dean's one is the best I have seen.

Buy some matched cells from a good matcher. You can find many on the RCtech boards here or companies like Reedy or SMC have good packs. The only device to get for matching batteries is the Turbomatcher 4/35, but they cost around $700 or so, not counting the powersupply and printer. By the time you get it all set up, its over $1000 and your batteries still won't have any voltage enchancement

Next, prep the cells. I use a nail file to scuff the surfaces the solder has something to adhere to. I then clean them with rubbing alcohol.

Put them in the jig and use a quality battery bar......either silver or copper. Stay away from Gold or Platinum bars.

I then tin each cell with a little bit of solder. I let my cells rest for an hour or so after tinning them so they have a chance to cool down.

The key after this is getting a good bond, but keeping down the time you have the iron on the cell. I get my iron nice and hot so it flows well and quickly. USE FLUX.



I use CA to hold my cells together, just make sure the labels are facing up.

Later EddieO
__________________
www.teambrood.com
EddieO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2004, 10:52 AM   #5
Tech Initiate
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Denver
Posts: 27
Default

Cool!

The two preveious replies are right along the line I was looking for.

I guess trying to match my own isn't practical, so that's out.

So I get pre-matched packs, that's fine.

I've also seen that Epic (for one example) offers a 24-pack of what I'll assume are unmatched cells. It would be cheaper than buying 4 six-pax. Would this be a good idea or should I just bite the bullet and buy pre-matched sets?

</c>
theChaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2004, 11:23 AM   #6
Tech Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Orlando, Fl
Posts: 458
Default

It depends on what you are planning to do, the Epic battery brickl would be great for bashing but once you start racing you are going to want matched cells.
TC3er is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2004, 05:10 PM   #7
Tech Elite
 
EddieO's Avatar
R/C Tech Charter Subscriber
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,414
Trader Rating: 6 (100%+)
Default

Don't waste your money on the epic cells, they are grossly overpriced because of the pretty shrink wrap and the over marketing by trinity/epic. Save yourself some cash and buy a battery brick from one of the battery matchers on this board. You can find them in the new advertising index on the main page.


Later EddieO
__________________
www.teambrood.com
EddieO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2004, 05:32 PM   #8
Tech Fanatic
 
SalvadoriRacing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Brazil, Sao Paulo
Posts: 928
Send a message via MSN to SalvadoriRacing Send a message via Skype™ to SalvadoriRacing
Default

why stay away from gold and/or platinum battery bars???

i was thinking about build my packs with gold bars....
__________________
Salvadori Racing
www.salvadoriracing.com.br

O.S. Engines - KM RACING - CONTACT TYRES - SAVOX - LRP - ARC | Blitz | Titan
SalvadoriRacing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2004, 08:46 PM   #9
Tech Initiate
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Denver
Posts: 27
Default

What do you consider "hot"?

Also I've found a pretty good deal on a Hakko 936 (50w). Will that do?
theChaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2004, 08:49 PM   #10
Tech Elite
 
EddieO's Avatar
R/C Tech Charter Subscriber
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,414
Trader Rating: 6 (100%+)
Default

Because Copper and Silver are better conducters of electricty. Gold and Platinum bars are simply a style thing.

I would get an adjustable temp hakko, they typically sell from 75-125.....easily worth it and a good soldering iron can be used for numerous other things around the house(assuming yer somewhat handy)


Later EddieO
__________________
www.teambrood.com
EddieO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2004, 09:24 PM   #11
Super Moderator
 
Grizzbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Sand Springs, OK
Posts: 3,063
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

While it's true that copper & silver have slightly lower resistance than gold, there is still one reason to try gold, corrosion resistance. Gold doesn't rust or corrode like copper or tarnish like silver, so it remains a good conductor for a longer period of time(that's why NASA & the military use gold in all of their electrical connections), & in truth the resistance of gold isn't that much higher than the others. But the choice is up to you, to be honest, I don't think you'll immediately notice a difference in how your packs perform either way(at least not until you've gained a fair amount of experience driving, where you can "feel" the effect of such minor changes).....
__________________
Bob Seay
Tamiya TRF417, TA05v.2, TRF211XM, M-05ver.2R, XRAY X12, Associated B5m Factory Lite

Go Pokes!!!
Grizzbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2004, 09:59 PM   #12
Tech Fanatic
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Chico, Ca
Posts: 810
Trader Rating: 6 (100%+)
Default

Try Promatch Racings web site for all your battery needs. They also have a very well written how to on pack assembly
schurcr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2004, 11:25 PM   #13
KoE
Tech Master
 
KoE's Avatar
R/C Tech Charter Subscriber
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Blue Marble
Posts: 1,228
Trader Rating: 6 (100%+)
Send a message via Yahoo to KoE
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by EddieO
I use CA to hold my cells together....
thanks for the tip
__________________
Yo!
KoE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2004, 05:47 AM   #14
Tech Fanatic
 
kt racing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: va
Posts: 848
Send a message via AIM to kt racing
Default

Quote:
What do you consider "hot"?
The iron that you have should work but just remember not to leave it on the cell forever. or you will damage it.

Also DO NOT buy any batterys from trinity. They are overpriced and there numbers on the packs aren't close to what the real numbers are. Like said before if you are just bashing then get a brick. But if you are going to race. Then you have to get the matched numbers. Try promatch, fukuyama, or fusion, or kinetics.
kt racing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2004, 09:40 PM   #15
Tech Initiate
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 46
Default

I built my own 3300 GP battery pack and was planning on soldering it directly to the speed control. I have two questions, both of them probably obvious:

1) If the wires from the ESC are not long enough, can I extend them using wires of the same guage and solder the ends together, cover the connection using the shrink wrap, or is this a no-no? I imagine that I'll want the overall length of the wires to be as short as possible.

2) when running a direct connection to the ESC, do you just charge the batteries by attaching clips from the charger to the -/+ terminals and just leave the electronics off? I'm worried about inadvertently damaging the components. I'm running the Novak Brushless 5800, which I believe is already setup with a shotkey and the correct capacitors as is.

Thanks!
jleibund
jleibund is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Soldering to Battery peterchia41 Singapore R/C Racers 5 05-16-2008 11:50 AM
Charging 3pk battery pack (8 cell 2400mah Venom NIMH pack) mcgmark Electric On-Road 2 11-06-2006 08:57 AM
Battery Soldering Secret_weapon Electric On-Road 19 08-30-2005 03:50 PM
JR R-1 800mAh battery pack, charger cord [Tx & Rx pack], (8) 700mAh Nicads + cradle Tom G R/C Items: For Sale/Trade 2 08-17-2004 03:46 AM



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. It is currently 02:19 PM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
Powered By: vBulletin v3.9.2.1
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Advertise Content © 2001-2011 RCTech.net