R/C Tech Forums

Go Back   R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Electric On-Road

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-27-2003, 10:23 PM   #1
Tech Elite
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Norman AR.
Posts: 1,954
Send a message via AIM to ZER01
Default Power Wire Length?

Which would be more effective? A shorter postive wire to the esc or a shorter negative wire to the esc?
ZER01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2003, 10:46 PM   #2
Tech Master
 
wagonman72's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Rancho Santa Margarita, CA
Posts: 1,090
Default

Yes.
wagonman72 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2003, 10:52 PM   #3
Tech Master
 
davepull's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Orange Park, Florida
Posts: 1,180
Default

the best would be to have both wires as short as you can.
davepull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2003, 11:59 PM   #4
Tech Elite
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Norman AR.
Posts: 1,954
Send a message via AIM to ZER01
Default

I didn't say best, I said more effective, I'm not asking if shorter is better I'm asking which of the two would be more effecient for the esc by being shorter.
ZER01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2003, 12:04 AM   #5
Tech Master
 
davepull's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Orange Park, Florida
Posts: 1,180
Default

the neg wire flows the power so try to keep it short
davepull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2003, 12:22 AM   #6
Tech Elite
 
EddieO's Avatar
R/C Tech Charter Subscriber
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,414
Trader Rating: 6 (100%+)
Default

pretty much all of the pro's who drive a losi, which requires that one wire will be MUCH longer than the other, have the negative as the shorter wire in their setups......very few have a short positive wire.

I would think though, that like connectors vs hardwiring arguements, that it would be an extremely small difference in performance....so small, that unless yer a professional driver, you wouldn't notice it on your best day.

Later EddieO
__________________
www.teambrood.com
EddieO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2003, 04:39 AM   #7
Tech Master
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: UK
Posts: 1,244
Default Re: Power Wire Length?

Quote:
Originally posted by proudwinner
Which would be more effective? A shorter postive wire to the esc or a shorter negative wire to the esc?

a shorter positive will be better as thats the input wire.
__________________
Tamiya
Much More Racing
LRP electronic
Futaba
Speedtechrc
trf racer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2003, 08:21 AM   #8
Tech Master
 
davepull's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Orange Park, Florida
Posts: 1,180
Default Re: Re: Power Wire Length?

Quote:
Originally posted by trf racer
a shorter positive will be better as thats the input wire.
no not in rc cars the power flows throught the neg to the speedo it to the motor neg to the motor out the positive on the motor and back to the battery. on 3 wire speedos. if it flowed through the pos it would go to the motor first.
davepull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2003, 04:25 PM   #9
Regional Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: East TN
Posts: 266
Default

Actually now you are getting into which way current flows. Convential current flow is positive to negative, and I forget what the other is called, to many years out of school, but I think its electron flow is negative to positive. This point has been argueed for years among physicist and engineers. I think they regulate the negative wire since it's easier and or similer for the semiconductor designer (since semiconductor assume current flow is negative to positive).

Regardless of which, each wire should be as short as possible and it really doesn't make a difference which, since the flow must be a complete path. As to the results of making each wire as short as possible, I don't believe you can notice a difference of 1" to 12", the resistance is so small, a bad solder joint would give you greater resistance then the lenghth of wire.

I would concentrate on driving the car, it will make a heck of a lot more difference then the length of wire.

Anyway have fun, this topic could sure start a bunch of flame wars
volav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2003, 04:58 PM   #10
Tech Master
 
davepull's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Orange Park, Florida
Posts: 1,180
Default

good point
davepull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2003, 06:08 AM   #11
Tech Master
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: UK
Posts: 1,244
Default

i cant imagine current flows negative to postive.
i was taught and had a great understanding that current flows positive to negative.
__________________
Tamiya
Much More Racing
LRP electronic
Futaba
Speedtechrc
trf racer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2003, 06:13 AM   #12
Tech Master
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: UK
Posts: 1,244
Default

it flows neigther way.
look at this website
__________________
Tamiya
Much More Racing
LRP electronic
Futaba
Speedtechrc
trf racer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2003, 06:15 AM   #13
Tech Master
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: UK
Posts: 1,244
Default

WHICH WAY DOES THE "ELECTRICITY" REALLY FLOW?
(c)1996 William Beaty
Electronics teachers and authors of textbooks are often chided for passing on an "error" to their students. Teachers promote idea that electric current is a flow of positive particles in one direction, when it really is a flow of negative electrons going the other way.
In fact, the chiders are themselves mistaken. They're laboring under the misconception that "electricity" is invariably made of negatively-charged particles called electrons. This is wrong. It also leads people to wrongly conclude that electric currents are really a flow of negative particles. Actually, in many situations, electric currents can really be a flow of positive particles. In other situations the flows are negative particles. And sometimes they're both positive and negative flowing at once, but in opposite directions. The true direction of the flowing particles depends on the type of conductor.
Electricity is more than just electrons
"Electricity" is not made of electrons (or to be more specific, Electric Charge, which is sometimes called "Quantity of Electricity," is not made of electrons.) Charge actually comes in two varieties: positive and negative particles. In the everyday world of electronics, these particles are the electrons and protons supplied by atoms in conductors. Physicists may deal with muons, positrons, antiprotons, etc., but at present the "electricity" in electrical devices is limited to protons and electrons.
Because the negative particles carry a name that SOUNDS like "electricity," people unfortunately start thinking that the electrons ARE the electricity, and they think that that protons (having a much less electrical name?) are not electrical. Some text and reference books even state this outright, saying that electricity is composed of electrons. In reality the electrons and protons carry electric charges of equal strength. If electrons are "electricity", then protons are "electricity" too.
Now everyone will rightly tell me that the protons within wires cannot flow, while the electrons can. Yes, this is true... for non-liquid metals. Metals are composed of positively charged atoms immersed in a sea of movable electrons. When an electric current is created within a copper wire, the "electron sea" moves forward, but the protons within the positive atoms of copper do not.
However, SOLID METALS ARE NOT THE ONLY CONDUCTORS, and in many other substances the positive atoms *do* move, and they *do* participate in the electric current. These various non-electron conductors are nothing exotic. They are all around us, as close to us as they can possibly be.
Non-electron Charge-flow
For example, if you were to poke your fingers into the anode/flyback section inside a television set, you would suffer a dangerous or lethal electric shock. During your painful experience there obviously was a considerable current directed through your body. However, NO ELECTRONS FLOWED THROUGH YOUR BODY AT ALL. The electric charges in a human body are entirely composed of charged atoms. During your electrocution, it was these atoms which flowed along as an electric current. The electric current was a flow of positive sodium and potassium atoms, negative chlorine, and numerous other more complex positive and negative molecules. During the electric current, the positive atoms flowed in one direction, while the negative atoms simultaneously flowed in the other. Imagine the flows as being like crowds of of tiny moving dots, with half the dots going in one direction and half in the other. The crowds of little dots move through each other without any dots colliding.
So, in this situation, which direction did the electric current REALLY have? Do we follow the negative particles and ignore the positive ones? Or vice versa?
Batteries are another example of non-electron or "ionic" conductors. When you connect a lightbulb to a battery, you form a complete circuit, and the path of the flowing charge is through the inside of the battery, as well as through the light bulb filament. Battery electrolyte is very conductive. Down inside the battery, within the wet chemicals between the plates, the amperes of flashlight current is a flow of both positive and negative atoms. There is a powerful flow of electric charge going through the battery, yet no individual electrons flow through the battery at all. While it's between the two plates of the battery, what is the real direction of the electric current? Not right to left, not left to right, but in both directions at once. About half of the charge-flow is composed of positive atoms, and the remaining portion is composed of negative atoms flowing backwards. Outside the battery in the metal wires the real particle flow is from negative to positive. But inside the battery's wet electrolyte, the charge-flow goes in two opposite directions at the same time.
Two-way currents are common
There are many other places where this kind of positive/negative charge flow can be found. In the following list of devices and materials, electric charges are a combination of movable positive and negative particles. During an electric current, both varieties of particles are flowing past each other in opposite directions.
__________________
Tamiya
Much More Racing
LRP electronic
Futaba
Speedtechrc
trf racer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2003, 08:36 AM   #14
Tech Master
 
davepull's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Orange Park, Florida
Posts: 1,180
Default

blah blah blah look at your car I have a tC3 with the battery positive in the back I run 1 red wire + from the speedo to the motor to the battery. now if power in these speedo's flowed positive to neg the your motor would run flat out all the time. look at the car and think about it
davepull is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2003, 09:02 AM   #15
Tech Adept
 
Airwide's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Posts: 167
Send a message via ICQ to Airwide Send a message via MSN to Airwide
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by davepull
blah blah blah look at your car I have a tC3 with the battery positive in the back I run 1 red wire + from the speedo to the motor to the battery. now if power in these speedo's flowed positive to neg the your motor would run flat out all the time. look at the car and think about it
No offense, but please don't post information if you don't know what you're talking about.
Airwide is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Does anyone know how to wire a 240 V AC to 12V DC power supply? Chickentrader Electric On-Road 45 03-28-2008 06:04 AM
Changing power wire connecting to ESC andy85 Electric On-Road 1 09-12-2007 12:10 PM
Reciever Wire Length peded Electric On-Road 4 03-09-2007 06:01 PM
Wire length of the NoVak GTB Bigedmond Electric Off-Road 5 01-30-2006 05:06 PM
Anyone know where to buy "26 Awg, 22 Stranded Wire" or typical antenna wire? Thanks Shrub Electric On-Road 9 04-16-2004 05:57 PM



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. It is currently 04:49 AM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
Powered By: vBulletin v3.9.2.1
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Advertise Content © 2001-2011 RCTech.net