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Old 03-11-2009, 01:43 PM   #1
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Smile Need Help please Tamiya!

Hi there i juts got my self a tamiya tlo1 which i know is not the bees knees but its a start and learning curve to rc cars as this is my first. Just bought some upgrades for it. These are the upgrades i have just bought. What i would like to know is what else i need to make it quicker etc, and the upgrades i bought are the following below.... will they make any difference.

The person i bought this off had a ripmax (extra,no limit) speed controller.. is this any good lol?
TAMIYA 53697 RC Super Stock RZ Motor Hi Revolution 23t 27,500rpm
Tamiya TL01 Hollow Carbon Gear Shafts
TL01 Sport Tuned Gear Set
Go my self some proper racing tyres with the foaming
Got a 4000mh battery
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Old 03-11-2009, 03:03 PM   #2
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The TL-01 isn't abad car, it's far from cutting edge technology but it's tough as a tank. You do have some tuning adjustability on the TL-01 but obviously not to the extent of the newer stuff out there.

As for the ESC being good enough, that depends on what class you're going to race in I don't see it being a problem for 27t or 19t stock classes but keep an eye on esc temps if you're going to run any mod motors.

There aren't many more hop ups available for the TL-01, maybe some TRF shocks and a front one-way.
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Old 03-11-2009, 04:08 PM   #3
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cool thanks,
what does a front one-way actually do, and is it worth doing the propellor shaft?
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Old 03-11-2009, 05:27 PM   #4
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When no power is supplied, the wheels on either of the differential are able to rotate very freely, but, when power is supplied, itís almost as if the axle becomes one solid bar and drives both wheels. This is the perception of most people, and the reason why they avoid it. However, during cornering, the one-way differential does wonders to the handling. Installing it in the front, creates a large amount of oversteer under acceleration, and the exact opposite, understeer, while coasting or braking. Installing it in the rear, has a similar effect to installing it in front, but not as aggressive. If you can adjust your driving style accordingly, and turn down the dual rate on your radio, you can vastly improve on your lap times with a one-way differential.
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Old 03-11-2009, 09:36 PM   #5
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One thing we don't know is if you have ballraced the chassis. That would be my first step.

Powerful motors in a car liek that will eventually run into trouble because your FDR is not limitlessly adjustable.

A one way is a tricky thing. The most basic explanation is that a one way transfers power when it spins in one direction and it doesn't when it spins the other way. This is fact. From here on, it's a bit more complicated.

There are a number of situations where you can tell what is going on, but what happens at low speeds is different to what happens at high speeds when inertia forces become important. Physically, when the car is driving forvard in a straight line, all four wheels are pulling it. When it is braking, only the rear wheels are braking, the front wheels are freewheeling.

When going around a corner the front of the car pulls with the inner wheel, the rear pulls with both wheels. The outer wheel having to travel a longer distance in the same time, has to spin faster and actually overtakes the one way, but it does so only becasue the car is pushing it, so it doesn't pull the car, it is pushed by the car. When braking whilst going around a corner only the rear brakes again, so you might get the car sliding sideways very easily.

When you add to the above higher speeds, various conditions of grip and suspension settings as well as weight distribution, it gets really difficult to tel what the car will do.

In principle, the one way not having any slip, will provide fierce acceleration, so you have to make sure you have the grip to use it. Coming out of corners is probably where you will feel instantly the car more powerful than before. Trying to brake with a one way will take some getting used to also. You will spin the car around easily if you're not careful.

Hope this helps.

Last edited by niznai; 03-12-2009 at 01:49 AM.
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Old 03-11-2009, 11:32 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gtfour93 View Post
When no power is supplied, the wheels on either of the differential are able to rotate very freely, but, when power is supplied, itís almost as if the axle becomes one solid bar and drives both wheels. This is the perception of most people, and the reason why they avoid it. However, during cornering, the one-way differential does wonders to the handling. Installing it in the front, creates a large amount of oversteer under acceleration, and the exact opposite, understeer, while coasting or braking. Installing it in the rear, has a similar effect to installing it in front, but not as aggressive. If you can adjust your driving style accordingly, and turn down the dual rate on your radio, you can vastly improve on your lap times with a one-way differential.
Sorry gtfour this is backwards...niznai got it right. Usually a one-way is used in the front on carpet where you have gobs of traction and need aggressive turn-in. I wouldn't suggest using it on asphalt unless it is very smooth, very well prepared, with lots of grip or you will probably just end up pointing the wrong way under braking. In most cases a front spool (solid axle) is your friend on pavement...you lose some turn-in but will more than make up for it because the car pulls much harder out of the corner. Oh and the number one thing you can do to make that Tamiya faster....practice grasshoppa!!

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Old 03-12-2009, 01:18 AM   #7
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Default TL01

In order to go fast you have to find a set-up that is easy to drive around the track. Like previous posts, it would be good to have decent aluminum shocks, although the plastic ones aren't bad. Use 30wt.-40wt. oil is the most common. Use Tamiya yellow springs all the way around and make sure the arms go up and down freely before you put on the shocks. This should get you around the track and practice,practice practice. Ask for help at the track and find out what tires everybody is using. This is critical as far as handing of the car.Last, is the RZ 23t motor is a great motor but it can be very fast if tuned properly, maybe too fast for you to get started. The main thing with this motor is to get the gearing right or you will overheat the motor and this will cause a lot of problems. You want the gearing to be around 6.0 is a good start. The main issue with the TL01 is that you are limited on gearing so try to get as close to this number as possible. If you take the time to get it set-up correctly you will have a blast! Finally the most important thing is "HAVE FUN"!
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Old 03-12-2009, 11:39 AM   #8
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thanks for the info chaps, but im a bit confused (maxpower) when you said i need get the gearing to 6.0 how do i do this?

thanks
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