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Old 11-09-2003, 08:35 PM   #16
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Everybody should check out the Trinity R-minus battery connectors. I have crashed so many times and the batteries have stayed connected. There have been some really wicked crashes that would have ripped soldered battery packs clean loose.
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Old 11-09-2003, 08:36 PM   #17
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exact same thing as mine
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Old 11-09-2003, 08:38 PM   #18
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wow, i would, but i'm not goin back to connectors. How did you crash that bad, and what did you hit. When i cartwheel that bad, usually "if" my battery comes loose, it rips my esc out to, makes the crash look a lot worse with stuff flyin around, even though my cyclone is really tough, and hasn't broke yet.
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Old 11-09-2003, 08:39 PM   #19
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good, because i bought my stuff at fleet farm, same as menards, home depot, places like that. I'm not buyin stuff at my lhs from deans, that is less solder, 5 bucks more, and makes me travel 5 miles further to get it.
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Old 11-09-2003, 08:43 PM   #20
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the only way that hard wiring will come loose is if you dont have enough solder on it

Hard wiring is just plane better

the only time i dont hard wire is when i dont have a swich, like on the runners

Last edited by nick b.; 11-09-2003 at 08:53 PM.
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Old 11-09-2003, 09:38 PM   #21
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I was racing indoor carpet, running down the backstraight and hit the end of a lane barrier and proceeded to go end for end for about 20-25 ft. Then smashed up against the retaining wall and landed on it's wheels. I don't think I ever saw my TC3 flip that much. I was lucky cause I drove the car away after that. Did break a arm but the batteries were still plugged in.
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Old 11-09-2003, 10:08 PM   #22
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OK I personally use deans connectors. The reason I do is that I know that the solder joints on them are good because I did Ohm test to them when I did them. If I were to hardwire I would have to rely on untested joints and im not a fast solder. I went to another thread and foungd this from a guy.

dpaton was his name

"OK, here we go again. I try every once and a while to dispel this myth, but no matter what I do, this one won't die.

The resistance of 12AWG copper wire is about 0.0002 ohms per foot. 14AWG is about 0.0003 ohms. The resistance from the end of the wire to the end of the cell, thru the battery bar and it's 2 joints, is about 0.00025 ohms, mainly because only about 20% of the racers I see can solder properly, but that's a different story. A perfectly soldered hardwire connection will have about 0.0015-0.0002 ohms of resistance, end to end. About the same as an inch of 12AWG wire.

The resistance from a properly terminated Deans or Corally style connector is about 0.00002 ohms.Yes, they're both LOWER than an inch of 12AWG wire (0.000025 ohms).

Let's do some math.

At 20A (stock class here, with a fast track), tells us we'll get about 0.005V lost across the average (poorly soldered) direct wire method, the same as a foot of 12AWG wire. That's 5 thousandths of a volt. with 7.2V (give or take) coming out of your pack, it's 0.0694% of your total voltage. Seven hundreths of a single percent of your energy.

The loss in the connectors will be a lot lower, on the order of 0.0004V. Including solder joints. 0.0055% of your nominal pack voltage. Fifty five thousandths of one percent.

In engineering terms, it's nothing. it's less than your speed control. It's less than a Tamiya connector by several orders of magnitude. It's less than the bad solder joint the guy in the next pit just made while hardwiring his pack. It's absolutely lost when you take into account the inefficiency of your motor.

You'll lose more track position by driving badly or moving an inch and a half outside the perfect line than you will because of the loss of your connectors. If you can't solder, or use a foot and a half of wire in your car, it's your own fault. The only conceivable reason to hardwire your packs is so that in the event of a crash, you won't get disconnected. Funny thing, I'm a really bad driver from time to time, and the only time I had a pack get disconnected was when I lost a retainer clip and the pack came out of the car.

Regarding soldering, if the joing isn't shiny and smooth, like a little drop of polished silver, it's wrong. If it looks dull, its wrong. If it looks crystalized, it's wrong, If it's lumpy it's wrong. If you can't see yourself in it, it's wrong. If it's wrong, you're losing more voltage than you ever would with good connectors.

This applies to battery bars, ESC conenctions, motor connections, and every other place you put solder in your car. Think about it.

Oh, and when you solder batteries, if it takes more than 3 seconds to get the solder on the end of the cell to flow and the joint to be happy (battery bars, wire, anything) you need a bigger iron, because you're just killing your batteries. I use a 350W gun to make packs. It takes 2 seconds to solder a bar, and my cells are cool to the touch when I pull them out of the jig.

My $0.02.

-dave"

This guy sounds smarter than me so I think Im good with the connectors. But If I were to go to a big race someday I might hardwire just so I dont look like a rookie.
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Old 11-09-2003, 10:44 PM   #23
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Quote:
[i]

This guy sounds smarter than me so I think Im good with the connectors. But If I were to go to a big race someday I might hardwire just so I dont look like a rookie. [/B]

right on!!...anyways..i totally agree with you there...on our lhs when we usually run late we rush the races and usually get no time outs...so the fastest way are to get connectors...i currently use corrally gold connectors on and off-road...did u get that.."off-road"....i haven't experienced any of my connectors get lose on a race...a lot of off-road racers use to use corallys and switched to hard wirring 'cause they said they keep comming lose...i showed them mine and they where just surprised...as for loosing...never felt the difference...if there is a difference...i guess you got to be super sensitive if you can feel it...


ps..the "i totally agree with you there" phrase is for your theory of connectors and not the rookie thingy and btw..wouldn't be nice to win a race with a deans battery plugs against those guys with the hard wired car that looks like a pro in the biggie??
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Old 11-10-2003, 09:55 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally posted by pro3racer
how is that possible. With connectors, you have a total of 4 solder joints, and the metal in the connector, and without them, is 2 solder joints, no connector, but in it's place is about 1/2 inch of wire.
Plugs will always be much easier to solder because of design. Most of the People I see using hard wire use a Battery Bar to solder to, so you STILL have 4 solder joints.

IMHO, if you cannot solder Plugs properly, you probably should not be attempting to hard wire until you practice soldering some more.
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Old 11-10-2003, 11:38 AM   #25
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im switching to connectors because my wires keep on riping when i solder it.... i grab the wire at the end and it always seems to rip all the time..
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Old 11-10-2003, 03:48 PM   #26
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I personally like hard wiring over any form of connector

No reason, but I just do.
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Old 11-10-2003, 03:59 PM   #27
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I use to use plugs and it was easy but then I have to solder the motor wires on so that is when I switch to hard soldering all my stuff. I don't feel any difference. I think I will go back to plugs in the near future.
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Old 11-10-2003, 05:32 PM   #28
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I used to always hardwire, but it got to be such a pain in the you know what I switched to deans. I will say I havent lost a race because I switched, nor have I gained anything either. Its for me much easier to change batteries now. But I will say that hard wiring looks far neater. Another thing I beleive If you are in a hard crash I think hard wiring will give before a deans plug
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Old 11-10-2003, 07:18 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally posted by popsracer
Most of the People I see using hard wire use a Battery Bar to solder to, so you STILL have 4 solder joints.
Where is your math skillz?
1 + 1 + 1 = 3
lol j/k
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Old 11-10-2003, 10:31 PM   #30
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i say forget the little voltage lost and use whatever you feel easier to to do and try to drive better that always seem to work
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