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Old 08-24-2004, 11:24 AM   #3376
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Quote:
Originally posted by TryHard
Not quite, I belive they are for the spacers on the inner hinge pin, for adjusting the wheelbase. At least that what i use that section for....
Ed
Yes, should be the spacers for the wheelbase.
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Old 08-24-2004, 11:28 AM   #3377
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Default Rear oneway

What exactly is the point of the oneway at the rear? I can't really see what it would do except relieve a small amount of load when free wheeling.

Cheers, Mark.
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Old 08-24-2004, 11:31 AM   #3378
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Quote:
Originally posted by V12
Yes, should be the spacers for the wheelbase.
Just setting up the car with the Marc Rheinard setup - to get familiar with all the parts.

There is a lot of slop in the front steering linkage - what is best to get rid of the excess slop? Should I simply shim the steering linkage?

Thanks, Mark.
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Old 08-24-2004, 11:36 AM   #3379
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Default Re: Rear oneway

Quote:
Originally posted by markp27
What exactly is the point of the oneway at the rear? I can't really see what it would do except relieve a small amount of load when free wheeling.

Cheers, Mark.
its a kinda failsafe, if during a race one of your front 1way outpus got grit or dirt in it its make the car pull to that side off power so itd be difficult to drive, the 1way layshaft gets around this problem by letting the wheels spin at different rates and the layshaft spins to couner to stop the pull.

its hard to explain hope you understand my explanation
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Old 08-24-2004, 11:52 AM   #3380
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Default Re: Re: Rear oneway

Quote:
Originally posted by s2
its a kinda failsafe, if during a race one of your front 1way outpus got grit or dirt in it its make the car pull to that side off power so itd be difficult to drive, the 1way layshaft gets around this problem by letting the wheels spin at different rates and the layshaft spins to couner to stop the pull.

its hard to explain hope you understand my explanation
Sort of - I know that the front oneway allows the front wheels to spin at different rates, i.e. if one wheel starts to rotate faster than the other, then it doesn't get driven anymore. This has the nice effect that when the wheels start to loose grip, the wheel with the most available grip gets driven...very nice

All the rear oneway can do it to prevent the front wheels front spinning faster than the rear wheels. So, if what you say happens (i.e. the front oneway effectively locks due to dirt) then power will be cut to the front if the front wheels start to spin. And off power the front wheels will simply freewheel.
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Old 08-24-2004, 12:10 PM   #3381
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yeh thats it much better than my poor explanation lol
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Old 08-24-2004, 12:15 PM   #3382
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Default Re: Rear oneway

Quote:
Originally posted by markp27
What exactly is the point of the oneway at the rear? I can't really see what it would do except relieve a small amount of load when free wheeling.

Cheers, Mark.
I think the difference will be onpower only. Driving through a corner you will have different speeds at every wheels. For the front you have the oneway to regulate this but without a center/rear oneway there is no diffrence possible between inner front wheel (which is the one with the slowest speed of all wheels) and the rear wheels. This means less cornerspeed and less steering.
But from what I hear a car without a center oneway will be somewhat easier to drive.
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Old 08-24-2004, 12:36 PM   #3383
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Default Re: Re: Rear oneway

Quote:
Originally posted by V12
I think the difference will be onpower only. Driving through a corner you will have different speeds at every wheels. For the front you have the oneway to regulate this but without a center/rear oneway there is no diffrence possible between inner front wheel (which is the one with the slowest speed of all wheels) and the rear wheels. This means less cornerspeed and less steering.
But from what I hear a car without a center oneway will be somewhat easier to drive.
I'm not sure this can happen, as the driving force is coming from the shaft on which the oneway is. If traction at the rear is lost, then the diff regulates the speed, but the input into the diff remains the same, as it is regulated by the front....i.e. when there is power being applied from the motor the centre oneway does not freewheel.

You can maybe think of a real world example, where you lift the rear wheels of the ground - they will still be driven at the same speed as the front wheel. But with a front oneway - if you lift one of the front wheels of the ground, it will no longer be driven.

This only works with the front way, as both wheels are on the same axel and can there rotate at different speeds.

I think the centre oneway can only be affective when not being powered.
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Old 08-24-2004, 12:39 PM   #3384
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Quote:
Originally posted by s2
yeh thats it much better than my poor explanation lol
It wasn't so poor and you got me thinking

Cheers, Mark.
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Old 08-24-2004, 12:45 PM   #3385
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Default Re: Re: Re: Rear oneway

Quote:
Originally posted by markp27
i.e. when there is power being applied from the motor the centre oneway does not freewheel.
Yep this is it - on power the gear is locked - the front one way can only act like it does, as there are two independent drive shafts going into it. In the case of the centre oneway, a solid axle is placed through the gear. The front wheel can only therefore freewheel when they are rotating faster than the driven shaft on which the centre oneway is - as soon as power is applied (i.e. the shaft starts to spin faster than the front wheels) then the front wheels will be driven independent of what is happening at the rear. But as the rears are also driven from the very same shaft then they also rotate at the same speed as the fronts - assuming of corse the gear ratios are all correct.

Last edited by markp27; 08-24-2004 at 12:55 PM.
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Old 08-24-2004, 12:57 PM   #3386
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I just assumed the centre one-way was to stop the belt spining off power, reducing the amount of friction in the drivetrain.

Oh and by the way, on power the front one-way acts like a spool, so both front wheels get equal power. Off power they can spin at different speeds, as they are free wheeling.

Try holding one of the front wheels when under power, you can't as it will still spin, as there is no diff action, unlike at the rear where you can hold a wheel, and the other side will spin.

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Old 08-24-2004, 01:16 PM   #3387
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Quote:
Originally posted by TryHard
I just assumed the centre one-way was to stop the belt spining off power, reducing the amount of friction in the drivetrain.
Seems a little gain, but whatever.

Quote:
Oh and by the way, on power the front one-way acts like a spool, so both front wheels get equal power. Off power they can spin at different speeds, as they are free wheeling.
It only acts as a spool when both wheels are rotating at the same speed. But in a corner the outside wheel is going faster than the inside and therefore only the inside wheel will be driven. Also at the point where one of the wheels loses traction, it starts to spin momentarily faster than the other one and therefore gets no power anymore. This can happen at the front as each wheel has its own drive shaft in the oneway and therefore they can spin at independent speeds.

Quote:
Try holding one of the front wheels when under power, you can't as it will still spin, as there is no diff action, unlike at the rear where you can hold a wheel, and the other side will spin.

Ed
Yep, this is because you are providing a resistance force to that wheel, effectively simulating the wheel which has all the traction or is rotating slower - the other wheel can't rotate slower than the driven one, i.e. the one with the traction, but the oneway also allows one of the wheels to rotate faster than the other one (be it on or off power) - but the faster one won't be driven.
You can verify this by applying a little power to the car whilst it is off the ground an then spin one of the wheels with your hand, so that it rotates faster than the driven one.

This is what leads to the excellent on power steering characteristic of the oneway - the slowest wheel is the one which is driven.
When the inside wheel looses traction, its rotating speed will soon exceed that off the outside wheel, which will then be driven instead of the inside one. Then as the inside is no longer been driven its rotating speed quickly falls below that of the outside wheel and it becomes once again the driven wheel.
This can also occur on the straight under acceleration - if the power outweighs the available traction, one wheel will quickly loose traction - when this occurs, it will rotate quicker than the other wheel and then only the other wheel will be driven, but the wheel which lost traction quickly falls to the same rotational speed as the other one and is once again driven - again this maximises the available traction.


Cheers, Mark.

Last edited by markp27; 08-24-2004 at 02:13 PM.
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Old 08-24-2004, 03:29 PM   #3388
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cool, that makes a load of sense. Deffiently understanf how it works better.

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Old 08-24-2004, 04:01 PM   #3389
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Quote:
Originally posted by TryHard
cool, that makes a load of sense. Deffiently understanf how it works better.

Ed
Cool Oneways are great little things!

Cheers, Mark.
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Old 08-25-2004, 12:58 PM   #3390
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Default Shock lengths.

Could someone let me know what the lengths of the shocks should be?

The rear shocks are causing me some trouble - I screwed on the lower ball joints so that the fully extended shock length was 61mm, but now I can't achieve a droop less than 4mm And when I set the ride height to 5mm, the pre-tention ring is virtually all the way at the top of the shock body.

On my EVO III my shocks are also 61mm and I have no such problems.

Any suggestions?
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