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Old 10-27-2003, 09:31 AM   #1
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Default An ideal way to control your RC

Hello, I am new to 1:10 touring and wondering what's the best way to control the car. Do most top drivers apply brake before entering into corner or they simply slow it down by only releasing the throttle trigger? Does anyone know? Thanks!
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Old 10-27-2003, 10:26 AM   #2
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Depends on the corner to be honest, some can be taken at full throttle, some hairpin bends require the use of some brakes. Most of the time if the throttle is just released then the car will free roll for quite a way, and would loose time compared to a faster speed followed by hard braking.
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Old 10-27-2003, 11:11 AM   #3
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i think it all depends on your driving style, and as berger said it depends on the type or corner
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Old 10-27-2003, 11:27 AM   #4
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It also depends on if you use a front oneway or diff or solid axle
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Old 10-27-2003, 01:43 PM   #5
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I race at Willis Hobbies and they have a small indoor carpet track with no main straight away. When I drive, I never apply brakes entering a turn because it just slows the car down too much. Wut I like to do is just let go of the throttle and then turn. As soon as I exit the turn, I then apply throttle to the car and go on. It works really well...I found that the fast guys only apply brakes on turns, otherwise it would slow you down.
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Old 10-27-2003, 01:50 PM   #6
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I'd say it also depends on your car - belt vs. shaft. Speaking from a stock motor perspective, the belt drive cars seem to do better when rolled through the corners, while the shaft drive cars can come in hot, brake, turn, and then hammer the throttle out. My Losi performs better if I keep that belt spooled up and moving.

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Old 10-28-2003, 08:01 PM   #7
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"I may not agree with a word you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it"-Voltaire
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Old 10-28-2003, 11:18 PM   #8
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Default Re: An ideal way to control your RC

Quote:
Originally posted by discus18
Hello, I am new to 1:10 touring and wondering what's the best way to control the car. Do most top drivers apply brake before entering into corner or they simply slow it down by only releasing the throttle trigger? Does anyone know? Thanks!
practice ...
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Old 10-29-2003, 12:15 AM   #9
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Default Re: Re: An ideal way to control your RC

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practice ...
uh.. thats helpful

if he practice the wrong way he will still not be able to drive properly

my advice would be to talk to the fast guys on the track running the same car and get some hints and pointers. if your running stock then its good. you should concentrate more on your cornering rather than having a hot motor..

as they say... crash and you'll lose all the advantage you get from the motor, battery, esc etc.

have fun!
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Old 10-29-2003, 01:29 AM   #10
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Actually, Practice is the best way to learn how to control your car. There is no substitute.

Your best bet is to find someone running close lap times or a little better than yourself, pull over, let the person pass, and then follow for a couple laps.

Not only will you learn throttle control, but you will also learn the line, and how to work traffic ( or work, and pressure your buddy into making mistakes ).
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Old 10-29-2003, 01:08 PM   #11
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Default Re: Re: Re: An ideal way to control your RC

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as they say... crash and you'll lose all the advantage you get from the motor, battery, esc etc.
Actually this is incorrect, you may screw up once in a while and tap a wall but if there is a crash or an incident with the people in front of you, you will have a much better chance of capitalizing on it if you have decient equipment. Now all of this falls on driver skill and you only get skill by practicing. Sure you want to know what lines to run, *but* every corner is different thus requiring a different line and different throttle control. Some turns require you to go deap and then hit the axis later in the turn so you can come out of the turn tight and setup for the next turn where as with others you can hit the axis early and go wide on the exit. The way you take corners also varies if you are persuing or being persued.

I've heard that the top drivers set there car up with as little steering throw as possible so that they take the straightest route through the course thuis being quicker. Most people arn't good enough to do this(it must take sick consistancy to be able to do it) but diff's such as a front one-way can help you limit servo throw and still have lots of steering.

I personally think smooth applications of the throttle/brake/ and steering conserve battery punch and your advantage on the track. I also feel that running two ball diff's(with no mid oneway) is a disadvantage on the track. Free roll is something that sucks alot less power and gets you alot further. Dual diff's with no mid one-way add alot of drag to the drivetrain and chew more power IMO. Thus when I drive I try and keep it smooth and I now run a mid one way completely loose. I only just recieved a front oneway from a friend and have yet to try it out on the track. I'm sure I'll like the front oneway even more.

Just my take,

fatdoggy.

Last edited by fatdoggy; 10-29-2003 at 01:26 PM.
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