R/C Tech Forums

Go Back   R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Electric On-Road

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 01-02-2009, 02:09 AM   #1
Tech Regular
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Goodyear, Arizona
Posts: 280
Trader Rating: 4 (100%+)
Default soldering question

what am i doing wrong?
i cannot get the solder to stick on my wire tips or my motor tabs.
i used flux... the iron is hot..
but it wont stick on.
is there a certain type of solder that has to be used?
macscac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 02:19 AM   #2
Tech Master
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: B.C. in Canada EH!
Posts: 1,028
Trader Rating: 8 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by macscac View Post
what am i doing wrong?
i cannot get the solder to stick on my wire tips or my motor tabs.
i used flux... the iron is hot..
but it wont stick on.
is there a certain type of solder that has to be used?
Use a good rosin core solder with a silver content. I use novak solder , i think its is 6 percent silver. this works very well. hope that helps a little.
__________________
Dustin Quanstrom
bambikilr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 02:24 AM   #3
Tech Adept
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 238
Default type of solder

If the solder is lead free it can be difficult to get it to wet. I would probably recommend either a 63/37 or 60/40 solder with rosin core and like to use the thinner stuff like .030 or smaller.

Mitch
__________________
Mitch Witteman
"Everybody goes faster!!"
www.teamcrc.com, www.teameam.com, www.tqwire.com, www.slapmastertools.com, Drinks Inc., SJS, KoonDog and M&G Roustabout
flyernemesis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 02:28 AM   #4
Tech Elite
 
Trips's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: 360 Speedway
Posts: 2,251
Trader Rating: 16 (100%+)
Default

The easiest to use solder I've ever worked with is plain old Radio Shack 60/40 rosin core. It doesn't have to be Radio Shack, really, any good 60/40 rosin core should be fine. I avoid the lead-free solders if at all possible. I know they're better for the environment, but they're a pain in the butt to work with, and I9 don't tend to put a lot of solder out into the environment anyway.

A common mistake I see people make in their early soldering attempts is not getting the work hot enough. The purpose of the soldering iron is to heat the work to the point the woirk will melt the solder. Heating the solder itself with the iron will not make it flow onto the work and stick properly. Use a bit if solder to tin the tip of the iron... it helps conduct the heat into the work better that way. Apply the iron to the work for several seconds, then apply solder to the join. As soon as you see the solder flow onto the work, remove the heat. Do not allow the work to move at all until the solder solidifies. There's a bit of artistry involved... you don't want to heat the work so long that you cause damage... and you dont want to use too much solder.

Like anything, it gets easier with experience.
__________________
MARSHAL!!
Trips is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 02:32 AM   #5
Tech Champion
 
nexxus's Avatar
R/C Tech Elite Subscriber
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Perth, Australia
Posts: 8,097
Trader Rating: 302 (100%+)
Default

I'll agree with the good old 60/40 stuff, never had an issue with it, works fine all the time. People may say "Lead is bad for the environment" and stuff but your home hobby soldering won't mean jack, and you probably recycle more than they do anyway (I know I do!)
__________________
A800 / A800X Awesomatix

Don't worry about what I'm doing.
Worry about why you're worried about what I'm doing.

"Ego is the anesthesia that deadens the pain of stupidity."

nexxus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 02:34 AM   #6
Tech Addict
 
05forfun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 665
Trader Rating: 81 (100%+)
Default

Clean surface, tip and sufficient watt in your soldering gun are important. Also make sure you pre tin the object (your motor terminals) and put small amount of solder on the tip of soldering gun before you solder, heat transfer reduces a lot without putting solder on the tip, dirty tip will have the same effect. Clean the surface and apply flux before pre tin. Hope it helps
05forfun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 09:35 AM   #7
Tech Master
 
Tire Chunker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 1,241
Trader Rating: 16 (100%+)
Default

Sand the motor tabs and twist the wires.
Tire Chunker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 09:39 AM   #8
Suspended
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 728
Default

Even though it's "hot" it doesn't sound like you have a hot enough iron or that the tip has gone bad.
Make sure you're using a 40W iron at a bare minimum.
WFO7640 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 09:56 AM   #9
Tech Adept
 
Railroader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 100
Trader Rating: 6 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trips View Post
The easiest to use solder I've ever worked with is plain old Radio Shack 60/40 rosin core. It doesn't have to be Radio Shack, really, any good 60/40 rosin core should be fine. I avoid the lead-free solders if at all possible. I know they're better for the environment, but they're a pain in the butt to work with, and I9 don't tend to put a lot of solder out into the environment anyway.

A common mistake I see people make in their early soldering attempts is not getting the work hot enough. The purpose of the soldering iron is to heat the work to the point the woirk will melt the solder. Heating the solder itself with the iron will not make it flow onto the work and stick properly. Use a bit if solder to tin the tip of the iron... it helps conduct the heat into the work better that way. Apply the iron to the work for several seconds, then apply solder to the join. As soon as you see the solder flow onto the work, remove the heat. Do not allow the work to move at all until the solder solidifies. There's a bit of artistry involved... you don't want to heat the work so long that you cause damage... and you dont want to use too much solder.

Like anything, it gets easier with experience.
^^^ VERY good advice ^^^
Railroader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 10:13 AM   #10
Tech Champion
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 7,211
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nexxus View Post
I'll agree with the good old 60/40 stuff, never had an issue with it, works fine all the time. People may say "Lead is bad for the environment" and stuff but your home hobby soldering won't mean jack, and you probably recycle more than they do anyway (I know I do!)
They make lead free solder.

And silver solder is harder to work with. Stick with 60/40 tin/lead until you get more experience.

And Trips soldering advice is dead on.
jiml is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 04:19 PM   #11
Regional Moderator
 
Mark Mixon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Sarasota, FL
Posts: 1,045
Trader Rating: 3 (100%+)
Default

Make sure both surfaces are clean and free of corrosion. A small wire wheel on a dremel will work to clean them, or sandpaper. Good luck.
Mark Mixon is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
General Discussion Modena AL MSRA (Memphis, TN) 7895 05-05-2014 05:50 AM
Soldering iron Question wade7575 Electric Off-Road 10 02-21-2008 02:54 PM
LRP QC2 Question (could not find thread) pheyhoe Electric On-Road 35 10-29-2005 09:08 PM
soldering 4ou Rookie Zone 11 07-06-2005 06:30 PM
Soldering question Silvercomet Electric On-Road 27 07-18-2004 02:46 PM



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. It is currently 11:27 PM.


We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
Powered By: vBulletin v3.9.2.1
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Advertise Content © 2001-2011 RCTech.net