silver solder

  • hey
    does any one know if silver solder (stick solder)
    would be better then 60/40 for soldering batteries together.
    thanks
  • The melting point of silver solder is too high, and the extra heat you need could damage the cells.
  • Using Silver Solder
    acid_rain182;

    Quote:
    The melting point of silver solder is too high, and the extra heat you need could damage the cells.
    Exactly, and the RE-melting point of Silver Solder is even higher, when you resolder. I settled on 60/40 for this very reason.
  • Right, & keep in mind that there should be VERY little solder between the surfaces you're trying to connect, so using silver solder will not improve conductivity or reduce resistance by a noticable amount(as long as you soldered everything properly), the key is the two materials you're connecting. That's why you shouldn't use any more solder than is absolutely neccessary.....
  • Kester '44'. 60/40 rosin core solder, smallish size. If it's good enough for almost every electronic application out there, I think its good enough for my batteries... I think a good, clean solder job is more important than trying to use silver solder to get more performance.
  • I've only used or seen silver solder used where the temps of the application would melt regular solder right off (jet engine). You would be frying your battery trying to solder with the stuff or melting your endbell trying to use it there.
  • Isn't Dean's and Acer's Silver solder??
  • it's got some silver in it but we're talking about different stuff
  • so deans' solder is ok, rihgt?
  • how bout the stuff with rosin inside of it?
  • Soldering
    Guys;

    Just use regular Rosen Core Electrical Solder (60/40) to avoid any problems.
    If you're concerned about the packs coming apart in a crash, use some CA or Shoe Goo to hold the batteries together. If you really ever need to disassemble the packs, they're probably at the end of their usable lifetime anyways.

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