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Old 08-07-2003, 03:59 PM   #16
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There is this track that I race at and my car tends to oversteer a little no matter what I do. This is with a normal diff on a tight carpet track.

Would it be a good idea swop to a spool?

Thanks in advance
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Old 08-07-2003, 04:07 PM   #17
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Wait so when you put in a one way, it replaces your diffs?
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Old 08-07-2003, 04:17 PM   #18
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There are two types of one-ways. One can be part of the mid layshaft pulley in twin belt cars(mid oneway). the other is a front one-way that replaces your front differential(front oneway). The mid oneway leaves the front differential in place but lets the front wheels free wheel so you can get through corners faster but they don't provide brake and arn't as effective as front one-ways.
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Old 08-08-2003, 07:57 AM   #19
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thank you. and let me further clarify.


Quote:
a one way bearing installed in the outdrive portion of the pulley/gear assembly is slightly different. it acts like a spool, locking up when there is any load in the reverse direction of the bearing....
i was refering to each side of the one way individually. meaning the one way bearing, not the entire one way assembly. stating that when a load is present in the reverse direction, the bearing will lock forming a momentary solid axle for that side of the drive.

durring a corner this reverse load is not present on the outside wheel, which is why it free wheels around the larger arc length, thus, yielding the gained average velocity across that pulley/gear. this was mentioned in various other places in the post. and is the primary reason a one way can be so fast!

perhaps the definition of a spool is not "to rigidly couple the pulley to the wheel", but "to both wheels". i'm not sure. if it is the latter, then i apologize for my loose use of the term.

sorry for any confusion.
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Old 08-09-2003, 12:03 AM   #20
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Here's an nice article about one-ways: http://www.rccaraction.com/articles/oneways.asp

One thing that isn't often mentioned, is that one-way diffs, is pretty hard on the CVD's / Universals up front. So they dont last as long as with a traditional diff.
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Old 08-10-2003, 01:41 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally posted by seaball
a spool will typically only give better times if the traction is high and the turns are tight and on power (carpet). while it still allows 4w braking, it tends to give a push off power, when the weight is transferred forward on corner entry because the wheels insist on being the same speed, producing slip. on power it will produce good steering as the inside wheel will drive regardless of whether there is a load present (tire lifting = no load).
I race weekly at a carpet track and everytime I attempt to use a spool the rear end of my car slides out under even the slightest amount of steering input, however while running a diff my car is planted to the carpet like it's on rails. Other guys at my track sometimes run a spool with no problem, so I can't figure out what my car is doing this. Any ideas?
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Old 08-10-2003, 06:00 PM   #22
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Have you actually tried to set it up properly with the spool in place?
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Old 08-11-2003, 06:14 PM   #23
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You do have to adjust your setup when you put a spool in. You end up having to tune in more steering into the corners, i.e additional castor etc..., as well as dial out a little steering coming out of the corner. Because you tend to get more steering coming out, if you're planted with a diff, you will feel loose with a spool coming out of the corners. I use the spool almost exclusively because the car was loose going in and tight coming out when I was running with a diff. It helped with both portions of the corner.
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Old 08-11-2003, 06:31 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally posted by Accord
I race weekly at a carpet track and everytime I attempt to use a spool the rear end of my car slides out under even the slightest amount of steering input, however while running a diff my car is planted to the carpet like it's on rails. Other guys at my track sometimes run a spool with no problem, so I can't figure out what my car is doing this. Any ideas?
Solid rear axles are more of a nitro sort of deal. They are not really meant for anything but huge tracks. On electrics, I've only heard of people using a solid axle up front... but I guess I'm not at your track. As you have found out though, the fact that the rear diff doesn't actuate causes the rear tires to lose traction because either they slip, or the drive-train breaks... so a diff obviously has more traction because it can adjust to the differing speeds between the two rear tires.


And seaball, Okay, I get you now. I got the idea when you said,
Quote:
it acts like a spool, locking up when there is any load in the reverse direction of the bearing.
...Apparently after that part of your post, I zoned out... big time .
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Old 08-11-2003, 08:26 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally posted by Im2lazy
Solid rear axles are more of a nitro sort of deal. They are not really meant for anything but huge tracks. On electrics, I've only heard of people using a solid axle up front... but I guess I'm not at your track. As you have found out though, the fact that the rear diff doesn't actuate causes the rear tires to lose traction because either they slip, or the drive-train breaks... so a diff obviously has more traction because it can adjust to the differing speeds between the two rear tires.


And seaball, Okay, I get you now. I got the idea when you said, ...Apparently after that part of your post, I zoned out... big time .
OH WHOOPS! I meant to say up FRONT, not up REAR... sorry. I've got the spool in the front of my car, not the rear.
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