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Tamiya TB-03

Old 08-15-2009, 09:31 AM
  #751  
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Originally Posted by Timmie
Yeah like Jimmy said, your droop settings put a stop to your weight transfer. Yeah you can use droop settings suggested to use in other chassis setups as a starting point for the TB03. Some things that will affect what droop settings you use are, what springs you are using, ride height, traction available at the track you are racing at, and personal feel *if the car feels right to you*

Basic way I tune with droop is this.... More on power steering, less droop in the front. More off power steering, more droop in in the rear. More rear traction on power, more front droop. Less off power steering, less droop in the rear. Hope I explained it well enough

As far as pushrod length, I use 14mm for most of my setups but do shorten or lengthen them from time to time. The length that you use will depend on other areas of your suspension setup. Things that will change this are what length springs you are using * some of the springs I use sometimes have 4mm difference in height to Tamiya springs...* what ride height you are trying to run at, and what droop setting you are using. The big thing in my opinion to look out for with pushrod tuning is to adjust these to keep the suspension from pre loading the front springs and binding your suspension. Get this adjustment wrong along with droop for instance, and you will have the suspension fighting itself just sitting on the bench.

Exactly +1

I run 12mm length "most of the time". I've been to 11 and up to 14mm.

The great thing about the pushrod adjustment is that I don't have to adjust the spring to get the ride height I'm looking for. (By that I mean, changing pre-load)



Jimmy W
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Old 08-16-2009, 12:04 AM
  #752  
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How does the Tamiya TB-03D compared to the Yokomo MR4TC SD CM?
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Old 08-16-2009, 05:22 AM
  #753  
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Finally, my spool arrived from Hong Kong and I got the chance to run it at the local track. The car handles pretty sweetly and is easy to drive, but the spool seems to have made on-throttle turning radius somewhat larger. Is this supposed to be the case? I tend to overshoot corners at the track - so having on-power understeer makes it all the more difficult to recover from such mistakes.

Will have to spend the next few track days resolving this... Any suggestions though, for a simple quick fix?

Ok - there's a random newbie question for the experts out there - I've been wondering - what's the difference between tamiya's ceramic grease and molybdenium grease? From the description they both seem to do the same thing...?
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Old 08-16-2009, 06:29 AM
  #754  
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Originally Posted by DriftWoof
How does the Tamiya TB-03D compared to the Yokomo MR4TC SD CM?
Hi DriftWoof,

Honestly if you are going to drift your not going to notice much of a difference in performance in my opinion. I think that both cars would perform pretty closely. What I believe you need to compare is parts availability, and what options you are able to purchase for the car to fine tune it to your goals performance wise. If you live in the USA you can't get Yoko parts except for overseas. Tamiya parts are available worldwide. Also you need to consider the support base you would have with each chassis. Do you have locals with either of these cars? That way you could get their help with the car. As far as the internet goes, I think you would be able to get more advice/support getting the TB03..not much going on with the SD chassis anymore.

My personal opinion?......Just get the TB03 Its a win win. Then if you don't feel like drifting anymore, put on some race tires and put the beat down on the locals
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Old 08-16-2009, 06:47 AM
  #755  
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Originally Posted by tns
Finally, my spool arrived from Hong Kong and I got the chance to run it at the local track. The car handles pretty sweetly and is easy to drive, but the spool seems to have made on-throttle turning radius somewhat larger. Is this supposed to be the case? I tend to overshoot corners at the track - so having on-power understeer makes it all the more difficult to recover from such mistakes.

Will have to spend the next few track days resolving this... Any suggestions though, for a simple quick fix?

Ok - there's a random newbie question for the experts out there - I've been wondering - what's the difference between tamiya's ceramic grease and molybdenium grease? From the description they both seem to do the same thing...?
I would suggest you try to get your rear to rotate more to assist your front, eg. Introduce anti-squat for the rear suspension, while on the front, can try some anti-dive. This should address your on throttle understeer issue.

Cheers!!
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Old 08-16-2009, 06:50 AM
  #756  
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Originally Posted by tns
Finally, my spool arrived from Hong Kong and I got the chance to run it at the local track. The car handles pretty sweetly and is easy to drive, but the spool seems to have made on-throttle turning radius somewhat larger. Is this supposed to be the case? I tend to overshoot corners at the track - so having on-power understeer makes it all the more difficult to recover from such mistakes.

Will have to spend the next few track days resolving this... Any suggestions though, for a simple quick fix?

Ok - there's a random newbie question for the experts out there - I've been wondering - what's the difference between tamiya's ceramic grease and molybdenium grease? From the description they both seem to do the same thing...?
Hmmm what suspension setup are you running? That would help us figure out what to suggest changing. Most of the time a spool gives you more onpower steering....not less. You sure your not just going too fast and not slowing down for the corners? hehehehe Or if your inpatient, just run less droop in the front You can try a little bit of tow out in the front, more camber in the front.

I am not a Tamiya grease expert. But I will still give my opinion

They are both probably lithium based greases, as are most greases out there, that they either add a ceramic additive or a molybdenum additive. Relating that with my experience with real life cars, moly grease is used for very high load bearing purposes, high temp,high speed, low speed,.. basically extreme enviroment. Ceramic greases are usually a mid grade grease used for lighter load bearing, high speed applications. Both are good to use on lots of things and offer similar performance in a lot of areas, but for heavy duty I would use the molybdenum.
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Old 08-16-2009, 07:33 AM
  #757  
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TB03

http://i217.photobucket.com/albums/c...03/chassis.jpg

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Old 08-16-2009, 07:52 AM
  #758  
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Nice ride, Swift, but holy cow that's a lot of toe-in on the front! Any reason you're running toe-in or did you have a wreck?
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Old 08-16-2009, 11:33 AM
  #759  
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Originally Posted by Timmie
Hi DriftWoof,

Honestly if you are going to drift your not going to notice much of a difference in performance in my opinion. I think that both cars would perform pretty closely. What I believe you need to compare is parts availability, and what options you are able to purchase for the car to fine tune it to your goals performance wise. If you live in the USA you can't get Yoko parts except for overseas. Tamiya parts are available worldwide. Also you need to consider the support base you would have with each chassis. Do you have locals with either of these cars? That way you could get their help with the car. As far as the internet goes, I think you would be able to get more advice/support getting the TB03..not much going on with the SD chassis anymore.

My personal opinion?......Just get the TB03 Its a win win. Then if you don't feel like drifting anymore, put on some race tires and put the beat down on the locals
Best answer I have had for this question. I understand now, there is in fact part support for Yokomo in the Bay Area and a parts for the Yokomo can be here in a few days. Only thing is though, I find my self wanting a Tamiya and need to justify getting one. I will get one in a few weeks or so. I hope it's as easy to put together and install hopups as the MR4TC SD.
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Old 08-16-2009, 11:46 AM
  #760  
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Originally Posted by tns
Finally, my spool arrived from Hong Kong and I got the chance to run it at the local track. The car handles pretty sweetly and is easy to drive, but the spool seems to have made on-throttle turning radius somewhat larger. Is this supposed to be the case? I tend to overshoot corners at the track - so having on-power understeer makes it all the more difficult to recover from such mistakes.

Will have to spend the next few track days resolving this... Any suggestions though, for a simple quick fix?

Ok - there's a random newbie question for the experts out there - I've been wondering - what's the difference between tamiya's ceramic grease and molybdenium grease? From the description they both seem to do the same thing...?
Spools are supposed to give lots of on power steering. It will force the car to move the direction the fronts point, and drag the rear with it. I have to be careful not to gas it too much or it will spin out my car. But when I put the ball diff back in, it was a pig on corner exit.

I use ceramic for anything plastic, and moly for metal to metal.
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Old 08-16-2009, 01:54 PM
  #761  
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I use tamiya ceramic on all the gears and Tamiya AW antiwear grease on all the metal to metal and on the cvd's AW is the little round blue container. A micro ammount lasts a long time I basically get Zero wear on my CVD's

Swiftand sleek....NICE ride.....
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Old 08-16-2009, 06:39 PM
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I'm bad at this, but is it ok to use the AW grease on the gears? By the way, what does AW grease has, ceramic or molybdenum? Thanks.

Cheers!!
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Old 08-16-2009, 06:44 PM
  #763  
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Originally Posted by kerk
I'm bad at this, but is it ok to use the AW grease on the gears? By the way, what does AW grease has, ceramic or molybdenum? Thanks.

Cheers!!
The manual calls for the molybdenum grease on the diff gears. Personally, though, I keep my diff gear clean and grease free so that it spins a bit more freely. I'm curious what others do, though.
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Old 08-16-2009, 08:09 PM
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Originally Posted by bluesxman
The manual calls for the molybdenum grease on the diff gears. Personally, though, I keep my diff gear clean and grease free so that it spins a bit more freely. I'm curious what others do, though.
I apply a light coat of AM grease on the my gears. After a pack, I find the drivetrain already spins very nicely with the motor removed.
After running the chassis for about half a year, drifting, the gears do not show signs of wear. I thought its pretty good.
So, wondering what other benefits can be had from either ceramic or molybdenum grease.

Cheers!!
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Old 08-16-2009, 10:21 PM
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Nice Rico! Thanks for posting these pictures you have a really nice TB03! You weren't kidding about having a lot of hopups on it! I think you have some on there I didn't even know about I like the hot pink +2 rims they make it stand out. I like the star stickers too thats neat.

But like bluesxman brought up, why so much toe in up front? Your car is probably so stable on the straight aways you could drive it in a 100mph crosswind! Straighten your front wheels up some and you should be able to gain some speed.
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