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Tamiya mini cooper

Old 07-15-2015, 04:18 AM
  #24706  
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Caltek- Great post. I'm also thinking about getting the metal steering linkage instead of ordering another spare tree. I hope you post more often.
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Old 07-15-2015, 05:33 AM
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When considering upgrading the steering linkage, I prefer the 3 racing linkage, due to the vertical bolting of the steering rod. I use shims and a longer screw to bolt them up, that way I can ensure the links are level with the floor when at right height. They work great

Here
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Old 07-15-2015, 05:43 AM
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Originally Posted by axle182
When considering upgrading the steering linkage, I prefer the 3 racing linkage, due to the vertical bolting of the steering rod. I use shims and a longer screw to bolt them up, that way I can ensure the links are level with the floor when at right height. They work great

Here
Those are exactly the ones I'm getting. Perfect. After that I need an adjustable steering rod and it will be mint. Is there a big difference between the tamiya ones and those?? Other than about 60 bucks
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Old 07-15-2015, 05:48 AM
  #24709  
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Originally Posted by axle182
When considering upgrading the steering linkage, I prefer the 3 racing linkage, due to the vertical bolting of the steering rod. I use shims and a longer screw to bolt them up, that way I can ensure the links are level with the floor when at right height. They work great

Here
Thanks, axle! Will check this out.

I know the weakest link now on the plastic steering linkage. If I change that out to metal, what part breaks next? Sometimes I keep weak parts on the cars on purpose so just wanted to double check.



BTW on another note.. to those of you looking at my pictures I posted from top view. My cars are off the ground so the toe out angles are exaggerated. I'd say around -0.5 to -1.5 degrees depending on the cars when on the floor. Just wanted to make sure so that people don't mistakenly set crazy toe-out looking at my pictures!
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Old 07-15-2015, 07:35 AM
  #24710  
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Why avoid the Tamiya hop up steering?

My personal experience with these aftermarket companies has been a mixed bag, so I tend to go Tamiya.
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Old 07-15-2015, 08:34 AM
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BTW on another note.. to those of you looking at my pictures I posted from top view. My cars are off the ground so the toe out angles are exaggerated. I'd say around -0.5 to -1.5 degrees depending on the cars when on the floor. Just wanted to make sure so that people don't mistakenly set crazy toe-out looking at my pictures![/QUOTE]

Nah, I looked at your steering link. The spacer was gone, so it was probably removed to shorten the link. The spacer is there so that builders will make links that are equal, square car, right, and give what Tamiya considers the right amount of toe out. It also looked like the gap was smaller.
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Old 07-15-2015, 09:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Granpa
BTW on another note.. to those of you looking at my pictures I posted from top view. My cars are off the ground so the toe out angles are exaggerated. I'd say around -0.5 to -1.5 degrees depending on the cars when on the floor. Just wanted to make sure so that people don't mistakenly set crazy toe-out looking at my pictures!
Nah, I looked at your steering link. The spacer was gone, so it was probably removed to shorten the link. The spacer is there so that builders will make links that are equal, square car, right, and give what Tamiya considers the right amount of toe out. It also looked like the gap was smaller.[/QUOTE]

What spacer Granpa...where is it/should be located?
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Old 07-15-2015, 09:23 AM
  #24713  
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Originally Posted by M05 newbie
Ya I remember the post before. Just didn't remember what page. Good advice on the bags opening one at a time lol. Ok 2 more questions. 1. What is the difference between 55D and 60D..
2. And how important is the foam insert and why not use the one supplied?

P.s I screen saved the information this time so I it's saved for good. Thanks Granpa. ....gluing the wheels on both sides also....LOL!
Home work assignment. You tell me the difference. Answer to the next question. In most open tire series, 55D tires are what are usually used. That should tell you that the 55D tires are probably better.

Remember, I said the supplied foam was too soft. When you were looking up the tires you should have seen the myriad of molded sponge inserts. Crazy selection. Spice make 5.0mm and 5.5mm thick inserts in 3 hardness. Sweep make 3 inserts 4.5mm thick. The Ride inserts are 4.0mm thick. These will give you tires with different characteristics. Usually molded inserts are for 55D tires. If the insert is too soft, the tire will move too much from side to side like an under inflated tire. This can lead to traction or grip rolling among other undesirable things. It took me nearly 5 years of playing with different tire and insert combinations and an investment of several thousand dollars, to really get a handle on this tire, insert, rim combination crap. And I had real advantage over most of the guys on this thread, cause I was friends with a couple of distributors and some of the Team drivers and could converse with other knowledgeable people. I had lots of help so much of the info shared by me on this subject and others, I learned from a lot of good racers.

With that said, the sponge inserts in almost all tires is too soft. Throw it away. For your Pit Shimizu 60D tires, the best insert is the Tamiya hard foam for an asphalt medium to low grip track. I have no idea what you use on carpet.
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Old 07-15-2015, 09:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Granpa
Home work assignment. You tell me the difference. Answer to the next question. In most open tire series, 55D tires are what are usually used. That should tell you that the 55D tires are probably better.

Remember, I said the supplied foam was too soft. When you were looking up the tires you should have seen the myriad of molded sponge inserts. Crazy selection. Spice make 5.0mm and 5.5mm thick inserts in 3 hardness. Sweep make 3 inserts 4.5mm thick. The Ride inserts are 4.0mm thick. These will give you tires with different characteristics. Usually molded inserts are for 55D tires. If the insert is too soft, the tire will move too much from side to side like an under inflated tire. This can lead to traction or grip rolling among other undesirable things. It took me nearly 5 years of playing with different tire and insert combinations and an investment of several thousand dollars, to really get a handle on this tire, insert, rim combination crap. And I had real advantage over most of the guys on this thread, cause I was friends with a couple of distributors and some of the Team drivers and could converse with other knowledgeable people. I had lots of help so much of the info shared by me on this subject and others, I learned from a lot of good racers.

With that said, the sponge inserts in almost all tires is too soft. Throw it away. For your Pit Shimizu 60D tires, the best insert is the Tamiya hard foam for an asphalt medium to low grip track. I have no idea what you use on carpet.

Ok I did some reading and have come to the conclusion it is diameter...which a smaller diameter wheel usually performs better. Sooooooo teach... (granpa)....did I get an A? And thanks for the tips on the foam. I really appreciate your knowledge and in depth information.
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Old 07-15-2015, 10:00 AM
  #24715  
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Originally Posted by niznai
Why avoid the Tamiya hop up steering?

My personal experience with these aftermarket companies has been a mixed bag, so I tend to go Tamiya.
I usually buy Tamiya, but I guess at this point my M05 is not for racing so I'm okay with trying other brands.

Originally Posted by Granpa
Nah, I looked at your steering link. The spacer was gone, so it was probably removed to shorten the link. The spacer is there so that builders will make links that are equal, square car, right, and give what Tamiya considers the right amount of toe out. It also looked like the gap was smaller.
Good eye, Granpa-san. I did toe out more because the M05 is not weighted evenly left and right and the softer springs I had on there required this much for tracking straight. I have a set height I want to keep for as this chassis is running my MonteCarlo body. Yes, the scale modeling/driving things you quickly disrespected earlier on. (I laughed because I knew you were trying to stick it to me again! )

That's okay, I'm into scale driving. I think the Tamiya Rover bodies and wheels are fantastic. I wish I had more side mirrors I could put on my bodies! If anyone has the M01 body J-parts they want to sell, let me know.

Now that I am using stiffer springs and front/rear stabilizers, I was planning on dialing out some of the toe out later on tonight to see where the car lands. Will also try the shock tower if I can't achieve the level of turn-in response. I agree that's a quick way to fix it.
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Old 07-15-2015, 11:02 AM
  #24716  
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Why avoid the Tamiya hop up steering?

My personal experience with these aftermarket companies has been a mixed bag, so I tend to go Tamiya.
Keep in mind if you race your Mini in a club that follows TCS rules this will not be allowed. Otherwise, no big deal. I personally always buy the Tamiya branded products for this reason.


Ok I did some reading and have come to the conclusion it is diameter...which a smaller diameter wheel usually performs better. Sooooooo teach... (granpa)....did I get an A? And thanks for the tips on the foam. I really appreciate your knowledge and in depth information.
Edited:
Per TCS ruleS, "60D" tires are used. Of the several tire types you can run there are treaded and slicks. The treaded are about 60mm, where as the slicks are a little smaller diameter about 58mm. This size difference creates a noticeable difference when racing and where results can be within tenths of a second of each other. There can be benefits to running a slightly larger diameter wheel in our mini's. If your racing per TCS rules, you don't have options for adjusting the gearing, so one way of getting a higher top speed is by using a slightly larger diameter tire. TCS rules specify specific tires to use, all must be premounted (I asume this is to avoid over-stuffing the tires for a larger diameter tire). The treaded tires (S-Grips are most popular) have a slightly larger diameter, it may only be a few mm's but it does make a difference in top speed. I prefer the way the smaller slicks handle, but not at the cost of top speed hence why I run S-Grips and make other adjustments to my car to get it to handle the way I want.

Here are the TCS mini rules I am referring to:
10. Spec Tire rules: The Mini class must use the Tamiya pre-mounted and glued spec tires manufactured by Tamiya: items 1016, 1028 and 1029. See rule #40 under "General Rules" for specifics. Note: This rule is enforced at every TCS location.

Last edited by eR1c; 07-15-2015 at 11:41 AM.
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Old 07-15-2015, 11:17 AM
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The only reason why I run 55D on my M05 is because that's the size the M01 MonteCarlo body was made for. 60D did not fit, and thanks to you guys on the forum, I got the right sized tires.

My other m-chassis all run 60D's.
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Old 07-15-2015, 11:49 AM
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Hey a question for you guys,

Our top racer (and a Tamiya TCS competitor) told me he had taken out one of the shims in his T03 ball diff to get it a bit tighter. I have heard of this technique in the past but didn't give it a lot of thought. I notice that my T03 diff does spin a bit more than I'd like around tight corners. I was considering taking out one of the shims as well, but saw this product from Tamiya:
http://www.tqrcracing.com/shop/produ....asp?p_id=5371

I guess you use this in place of bearings, will this make the diff' too tight? Thoughts or experience with this would be appreciated ...I want my diff to spin, but not too freely. I do feel I am losing a bit of speed around tight turns that I'd like back. But definitely don't want a locked diff either.
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Old 07-15-2015, 12:12 PM
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Originally Posted by eR1c
Hey a question for you guys,

Our top racer (and a Tamiya TCS competitor) told me he had taken out one of the shims in his T03 ball diff to get it a bit tighter. I have heard of this technique in the past but didn't give it a lot of thought. I notice that my T03 diff does spin a bit more than I'd like around tight corners. I was considering taking out one of the shims as well, but saw this product from Tamiya:
http://www.tqrcracing.com/shop/produ....asp?p_id=5371

I guess you use this in place of bearings, will this make the diff' too tight? Thoughts or experience with this would be appreciated ...I want my diff to spin, but not too freely. I do feel I am losing a bit of speed around tight turns that I'd like back. But definitely don't want a locked diff either.
I have tried these and come to the assumption, only run them if you want a spool feel. If the diff is a tad too loose with these, the gear will slip and cause erratic behavior on high speed turns. You really have to crank on the diff screw to make these act like a spool, but they do work.
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Old 07-15-2015, 01:15 PM
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Originally Posted by eR1c
Hey a question for you guys,

Our top racer (and a Tamiya TCS competitor) told me he had taken out one of the shims in his T03 ball diff to get it a bit tighter. I have heard of this technique in the past but didn't give it a lot of thought. I notice that my T03 diff does spin a bit more than I'd like around tight corners. I was considering taking out one of the shims as well, but saw this product from Tamiya:
http://www.tqrcracing.com/shop/produ....asp?p_id=5371

I guess you use this in place of bearings, will this make the diff' too tight? Thoughts or experience with this would be appreciated ...I want my diff to spin, but not too freely. I do feel I am losing a bit of speed around tight turns that I'd like back. But definitely don't want a locked diff either.
This is an old technique and I just posted on this very thing not too long ago. I guess you must have missed it or didn't read it. I'm assuming the shims you are referring to are the cone or Belleville washers. There are 5 in the diff. 3 large ones and 2 small ones. You leave out one of the small ones and leave all 3 of the large ones in place. If you tighten the diff screw down all the way, it will give you an extremely tight diff-----that is to me a very tight diff, maybe not to others.

Pros----tight diff

Cons-----There are many. You place a very high load on the thrust bearing. Due to that the diff starts feeling "rough" very early. There's no way to reduce the load cause if you back the diff screw out it will come loose. You have to replace the thrust bearing on every rebuild and you should rebuild often.

There are better ways to do this and I posted that also.
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