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bo54 01-02-2008 05:27 PM

Carpet Touring comparison
 
Looking to get started in the 1/10 scale indoor carpet foam tire class.
Assuming the same experienced driver drove each of the many manufactured cars with comparable motor/batteries/tires would there be a drastic performance difference? Can the same driver be competitive with a chassis that is not common at a given track?

A few of the cars being looked at -
XRay T2 - Losi JRX type R - HB Cyclone - AE T5 - Academy STR-4

I understand the advantage of having a car your local hobby shop stocks parts for, but, why such price differences? As well, if you have a chassis others are locally running you can also learn from their setups. Trying to determine if I can be competitive in the beginner to advanced class with a lower $$$ new car or should I look for a higher end used car?

Centerline Racing 01-02-2008 06:49 PM

Every self-respecting racer will tell you that being competitive is not as cut and dry as the chassis you drive.

Last season, we had a skilled driver at The RC Barn (MN) take a old, stale TC3 off the shelf with 3 years of dust on it. He blew it off, adjusted the chassis, raced, TQ'd AND took 1st place.

There is a new kid with a TC5, brushless/lipo who is having trouble keeping it between the rails.

The newest chassis will NOT win races. Skill and knowledge is what gets you into the A-main.

IMHO
Allan

bo54 01-02-2008 06:57 PM

Allan,
Thanks, that is the type of information I am looking for. I understand it takes a combination of driver and equipment to be competitive. I know that it takes time and experience to win races, I am just wondering would it be a waste of money to purchase one of the kits below $300 and find out next year that the car cannot compete with another like experienced driver using say a Schumacher or Xray vs Hot Bodies or like.

abailey21 01-02-2008 07:01 PM

Preach it brother!!!

Quote:

Originally Posted by Centerline Racing (Post 4031586)
Every self-respecting racer will tell you that being competitive is not as cut and dry as the chassis you drive.

Last season, we had a skilled driver at The RC Barn (MN) take a old, stale TC3 off the shelf with 3 years of dust on it. He blew it off, adjusted the chassis, raced, TQ'd AND took 1st place.

There is a new kid with a TC5, brushless/lipo who is having trouble keeping it between the rails.

The newest chassis will NOT win races. Skill and knowledge is what gets you into the A-main.

IMHO
Allan


hicheef 01-02-2008 09:06 PM

Amen
 
Amen,
I'm on my third xray and I still suck because I don't dedicate enough time. You want to be competitive? Practice, Practice and when you are done with that...........practice some more. OK, go ahead, I know somebody is gonna say quit buying Xrays:lol::lol::lol:. Don't despair though, it's all worth it.

Kevin

Rc guy 01-02-2008 09:17 PM

Any of the chassis you mentioned are competetive. You just need to take the time to practice with it and adjust it to your driving style. I have raced a TC3 in the past and was competetive without alot of adjusting. I am running a X-Ray now and have yet to get it adjusted to my driving style. (Not enough practice time) When I get it set the way I like it it will be a fun car to run.

Centerline Racing 01-02-2008 10:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bo54 (Post 4031629)
Allan,
Thanks, that is the type of information I am looking for. I understand it takes a combination of driver and equipment to be competitive. I know that it takes time and experience to win races, I am just wondering would it be a waste of money to purchase one of the kits below $300 and find out next year that the car cannot compete with another like experienced driver using say a Schumacher or Xray vs Hot Bodies or like.

My 11 yr old son and I started organized racing Nov '06. In the past year, we have gone from breaking every other lap and trying to stay out of everyone's way to top of the A-mains.

We started out with TC3/TC4s for the first year, relatively inexpensive and abundant parts. This last November ('07), we started racing Serpent's S400. Keep in mind that in some form, we race 2 times a week and try to practice one more for 3 times a week on the track.

We run the gammet of cars year round (see sig below), and each one has it's pros/cons. But the track time is REALLY what has given us the 'on-track' edge in our skills. The track time for any of the classes we run will translate equally to the other classes. A 'current model' chassis doesn't hurt, but the knowledge we have gained since the beginning has helped us to dial in what ever chassis we run.

We still have a long way to go, but at least we are on the right "track"

What ever chassis you go with, be certain that if you want to compete, learn everything you can about the chassis. This includes the consumables (breakables) and how easy they are to purchase AND install inbetween heats. A broken car can't make the grid. ;)

One more thing; Buy the most car you can with the budget you have available, and buy used, if possible. Your LHS would love to sell you a kit, but they rarely make $20-30 per kit. They'll get you back for everything else.

Good Luck
Allan

bo54 01-03-2008 06:50 PM

Thanks for the response, seems as if the manufacturer and initial cost is not near as important as learning which ever car you decide upon. I am leaning towards the AE TC4, found a new RTR for $169 and the local hobby shop has plenty of replacement parts on hand.

mtbboy 01-03-2008 07:43 PM

Interesting forum.

I blew the dust off of my old xxxs g+ (losi) and on my first night back tq ed and won 19 turn.

3300 batteries and all I kept it off the boards.
AS I got crushed on the straights I was able to slow and steady my way along through the infield beacause of how "slow" my car was relative to some of the other guys.

My point?

When its your chassis and not the track barriers slowing you down consider a new chassis.
Until that time become CONSISTANT.

DAve.:cool:

Centerline Racing 01-03-2008 09:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bo54 (Post 4035528)
Thanks for the response, seems as if the manufacturer and initial cost is not near as important as learning which ever car you decide upon. I am leaning towards the AE TC4, found a new RTR for $169 and the local hobby shop has plenty of replacement parts on hand.

The RTR TC4 is a good car. It will give you a good platform to start with and build upon. Set goals...no upgrades or hopups until you reach a certain plateau. Don't get impatient, learn the car and drive the track. You won't regret it.

Good Luck.

Allan

Centerline Racing 01-03-2008 09:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mtbboy (Post 4035756)
Interesting forum.

I blew the dust off of my old xxxs g+ (losi) and on my first night back tq ed and won 19 turn.

3300 batteries and all I kept it off the boards.
AS I got crushed on the straights I was able to slow and steady my way along through the infield beacause of how "slow" my car was relative to some of the other guys.

My point?

When its your chassis and not the track barriers slowing you down consider a new chassis.
Until that time become CONSISTANT.

DAve.:cool:

Yep, did the same thing last month at LSRCC. I was running 13.5 and 10.5 sedan.

All thru the day, I was swapping motors to keep competitive (after this race, I ended up buying another chassis). The mains were ordered differently and I didn't have time to swap motors from 13.5 to 10.5, so I ran 13.5 in the 10.5 class. I had my A$$ handed to me on the 100ft strait, but I blew by EVERYONE on the infield.

Second thru 5th were on the same lap, 1 down from the leader, with a margin of just 9 seconds (on an 11 second track). I finished 5th behind 4 other 19T/10.5 sedans.

Showed me that slower IS faster.

tc3team 01-04-2008 03:03 AM

A car that is well looked after, set up well and driven consistantly will get you a long way.

You can only do that if you put the time into making that happen.

I raced once a week and got my lap times within 4/10ths of a second between my best and average lap, when you race like that you know you are onto a good thing :cool::D

Mr. Bubby 01-04-2008 05:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bo54 (Post 4035528)
Thanks for the response, seems as if the manufacturer and initial cost is not near as important as learning which ever car you decide upon. I am leaning towards the AE TC4, found a new RTR for $169 and the local hobby shop has plenty of replacement parts on hand.

Not to say anything bad about AE or anything like that, but take a good look at the TC4 before you buy (It really wasn't out for that long, and to the best of my knowledge, none of the Factory drivers really liked it). I think it was AE's attempt at a "shaft drive" X-ray. I don't think it worked too well. If you're looking at AE for sedan, take a good look at the TC5, they've done a lot of refinements and went to the belt system, (which is the norm nowadays). I, myself have driven the Xray since the 2nd generation T1 car and would not change company's for anything. I think they're support is top notch and the cars are always on top of the leaderboards. But really there are so many to choose from it's crazy, and they're all really really good cars and all are able to win the A-main with the right driver behind the wheel.
But whatever car you end up getting, make sure you get the right tires for the track, you can end up spending loads of money trying to find that "just right" combination, I would strongly suggest finding out what the fast drivers are running and going from there.

Some people might scoff at this:sneaky:but I would also suggest getting the "TOURING CAR BIBLE" (The XXXMain chassis set-book). It'll be an extra $20 bucks but totally invaluable for setting up your chassis:nod::nod:

WEIGHT TRANSFER IS THE KEY!!!!:eek:

Oh yeah and remember this "SLOW IS SLOW, FAST IS FAST, BUT BEING SMOOOOOOOTH IS LIGHTNING FAST:nod:

Waltrip55 01-04-2008 10:19 AM

Shaft drive vs. belt drive is not even an issue at the club level. I run a TB-02 that I put lots of time into it and I am running just fine with x-rays, 415s, etc. The TC4 would be perfect because it is "older" technology and would be cheaper for him to start with.

Once you find the set-up, its all about being consistent. I ran a New Years day race and my fastest lap time was 14.3 with 21 laps at 5:06. The guys in my main ran fast laps of 13.6s 13.7s, but we were all within a second of each other. We had 6 mains of stock rubber...and this was the C-main, and I ended up finishing the day out dead center out of a whole bunch of guys getting ready for the Novak race. My final drive was at 5.4 instead of 5.0....I'm getting that fixed once my 27t tamiya pinion gear comes from Japan:D.

Ed237 01-04-2008 10:59 AM

Bubbys right - I would stay away from the TC4. Not only did they not handle very well, but they were pretty frigile too.

The Losi XXXS is still a better overall car than the TC4. The TA05R is also a great club racer.

If you want something shaft drive, look at the TB02.


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