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Old 12-12-2007, 01:36 AM   #1
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Default How to tell set a ball diff?

Can anyone shed some light on how to set a ball diff?

like the window off tightness seems very large.....
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Old 12-12-2007, 02:28 AM   #2
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Tighten the Diff to a point that it doesn't slip when you hold on the spur and 1side of the wheel while try turning the other other wheel.

This is what I usually do.
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Old 12-12-2007, 03:26 AM   #3
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like as soon as it stops slipping?

what will be the effects if you go a bit more tighter?

anyone know?
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Old 12-12-2007, 03:26 AM   #4
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1. Shouldn't slip (as described above)
2. Should rotate smoothly
3. Within the above setting, a freer (rear) diff will generate more grip, a tighter one will generate less. Front diff if used is normally set a little tighter for stability.
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Old 12-12-2007, 03:37 AM   #5
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i would like to know the limits of tight and free too.

so the first thing we should do is to make sure that the diff doesnt slip as mentioned in the second post..

after that... the free(est) setting is no slip plus wheels feel very loose
and the tighest setting is no slip plus wheels does feels hard to rotate. is that right?

i did try to set it super loose, but there was heaps of slipping and it was accelerating slow ass, which is an obivious reason why??
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Old 12-12-2007, 03:57 AM   #6
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This is by no means the absolute answer, but on a touring car I'll set the diff tight enough that it will never slip under power, and the limit of tightness for me is that when I turn one wheel the other wheel turns in the opposite direction rather than the same direction (with motor and pinion in place.) in other words, if I can make the drive train turn the motor by turning one wheel the diff is tighter than I'd run it. This is with a brushed motor in place... some brushless are so "cog" free that even a fairly free diff wil turn them over.

On a 1/12 pan car, I always run the diff as free as I possibly can without letting it slip under power. I don't ever use a tighter diff as a tuning option (although I know more than a few racers who I repsect that DO run their diffs a bit tighter under certain conditions.)
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Old 12-12-2007, 11:35 AM   #7
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Tuning using diffs is not an exact science, in that it is hard to replicate from each diff rebuild. Some rebuilds the diff will seem tighter to achieve the non slip point than others. Ultimately it is ideal to set your diffs as others above have said. Just tight enough to provide no slip and with tc's if you use a front diff it should be slightly tighter than the rear. In a tc the end of the car with the tighter diff will be the driving force of the car in the corners. So if your front diff is slightly tighter the front end of the car will pull the car through the corner. If you are the type of person who likes to power through the corners then try a slightly tighter rear diff, but too tight and you will lose traction and slow yourself down.

This is all subjective to my experience so it may not be right. But another thing I have noticed is that a tighter diff means more tire wear.
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Old 12-12-2007, 03:51 PM   #8
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Default Touring Car question #429

It would be inetersting to compile a complete list of things you need to know to race a touring car competitvely that are not included in the instruction manual, or if included the answer as detailed as it needs to be.
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