R/C Tech Forums

Go Back   R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Electric On-Road

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-15-2007, 08:51 PM   #1
Tech Adept
 
fruitland04's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 106
Trader Rating: 6 (100%+)
Default Droop settings

Could someone explain droop settings and what it does for the handling of the car? How it's measured?
Thanks
__________________
Jesus died for sinners, of which I am the worst.
Do you know Him?
fruitland04 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2007, 09:24 PM   #2
Tech Apprentice
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 65
Default

Droop is the measurement of how far down the wheels travel in relation to the chassis when the suspension unloads before they hit the down stops.

More droop equates to greater weight transfer when accelerating or breaking, intensifying the effect.

More rear droop will allow the rear of the car to rise further when breaking/decelerating, shifting more weight to the front and increasing initial turn-in and off power steering.

More front droop causes greater weight transfer to the rear under acceleration, which increases rear traction but reduces on power steering.

It's measured with a ride height gauge - set your ride height first and then set droop by setting the corner of the chassis on the droop gauge at the ride height + desired droop amount mark and turning the droop screw on that corner until the tire just barely lifts off the ground. Every time you change ride height, you'll need to check droop as well.

Once the whole car has been set, verify the left and right sides of the car come off the table at the same time by lifting the chassis by the center point on each end. This bit is very important to ensure the car behaves the same when turning left and right and you haven't introduced artificial tweak.

On a smooth carpet track, start with a 5mm ride height and 2mm of droop all around and tune from there. Running with less than 2mm or more than 2.5mm and you may find some odd handling that you can't explain, so be careful. You'll want to turn this into a standard task when you're pitting if you're running foams as ride height will change each time you go out.

HTH,
Chris
ckearns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 04:13 AM   #3
Tech Master
 
1fastdude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Sinsinnati
Posts: 1,938
Trader Rating: 15 (100%+)
Default

I believe that you may be stating "MORE" droop inacurate! More droop designates the arms are more of an angle to the ground. Less droop means the arms are more level to the ground. What you are referring to would be chassis "UP TRAVEL", but your analogy is accurate.
__________________
★RCAmerica •Xray •Hudy •BSR •Absolute Hobbyz •Gravity RC •PROTOform •Avid •TQ Racing Wire •C & M Motorsports ★

Last edited by 1fastdude; 11-16-2007 at 07:42 AM.
1fastdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 04:33 AM   #4
Tech Adept
 
nutsisneat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Switzerland
Posts: 101
Default

Can you say that your car is rolling better around corners when
you have less droop or up-travel?

Or: the more grip you have from the surface, the less droop?
nutsisneat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 05:02 AM   #5
Tech Elite
 
sosidge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Bristol, UK
Posts: 3,865
Default

Here is my take.

To eliminate confusion, I will substitue the word "droop" (which has a million different ways of measuring) for downtravel.

By downtravel I mean the amount the wheels will sag before leaving the ground if you lift the car up from its normal ride height

If you are using a standard droop gauge, a larger number on the gauge (which some people may say is "more droop") is actually LESS downtravel.

Onto the handling aspects in a simple way.

If your suspension has more downtravel, it will tend to create more grip at that end of the car. However that end of the car will feel less responsive.

If the suspension has less downtravel, it will tend to take away grip. But the car will feel more responsive.

More downtravel will also improve the ride and handling on a bumpy track.

On rubber tyres I always run ample downtravel all round to maximise traction. On foam tyres there may be an argument for reducing it if you are generating too much grip. However you should always run at least a couple of mm of downtravel otherwise you will greatly compromise the handling.
sosidge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 06:16 AM   #6
Tech Elite
 
Joel Lagace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 2,628
Trader Rating: 4 (100%+)
Default

Im with you its down travel.


ITs universal accross all cars if you work with the term "down travel". Its the diffenence between the cars ride heigh at full shock extention and its static ride height. Normal downtravel numbers range from 0mm to 4mm i dont think we use much more then 4mm in onroad.
__________________
"Without Rules its just Backyard Bashing!"
www.rcottawa.com
Joel Lagace is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 06:42 AM   #7
Tech Master
 
LOSI BOY-MF2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Arlington, Texas
Posts: 1,604
Trader Rating: 80 (100%+)
Default

I dont know if that helped fruitland but it helped me.
Thanks
LOSI BOY-MF2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 11:28 AM   #8
Tech Elite
 
Skiddins's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Windsor, UK
Posts: 4,760
Default

To accompany some of the above explainations;
__________________
Xray T4'18, T4'14 (Wet Car)
Xray X12 2018
Xray X1'16
wlrc.co.uk (West London Racing Centre)
RCDisco.co.uk
Skiddins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 12:26 PM   #9
Tech Master
 
1fastdude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Sinsinnati
Posts: 1,938
Trader Rating: 15 (100%+)
Default

Looks like too much camber.................................
__________________
★RCAmerica •Xray •Hudy •BSR •Absolute Hobbyz •Gravity RC •PROTOform •Avid •TQ Racing Wire •C & M Motorsports ★
1fastdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 01:21 PM   #10
Tech Master
 
fpart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: NJ
Posts: 1,967
Trader Rating: 40 (100%+)
Send a message via Skype™ to fpart
Default

Is that a stock Shumacher rear hub. I wonder if it is the same as the HB or Pro 4?
__________________
teamTrinity.com Sweepracingusa.com
スクービーは私のヒーローです!
Why is Scooby so slow, you might ask?
fpart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 01:25 PM   #11
Super Moderator
 
Marcos.J's Avatar
R/C Tech Elite Subscriber
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Semper Fi
Posts: 27,187
Trader Rating: 182 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fpart View Post
Is that a stock Shumacher rear hub. I wonder if it is the same as the HB or Pro 4?
the hpi has a smaller hinge pin, thats a schumacher part #U2741, you can use the hpi one but you have to drill it out to 1/8th
Marcos.J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 02:33 PM   #12
Tech Addict
 
GreaseMonkey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Posts: 552
Trader Rating: 4 (100%+)
Default

The Schumacher isn't metric?
__________________
I'm not a grown man playing with toys. I'm a hobbyist.
GreaseMonkey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 03:08 PM   #13
Tech Apprentice
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Dallas, TX
Posts: 65
Default

All the hardware is metric. It's just those hinge pins that are standard.

Chris
ckearns is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2007, 08:36 PM   #14
Tech Adept
 
fruitland04's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 106
Trader Rating: 6 (100%+)
Smile

Thanks guys. That helps a lot. However, I'll have to store this knowledge away until my driving gets better.

I race outdoors on asphalt with rubber tires, so this will help me when experimenting with race setup.
__________________
Jesus died for sinners, of which I am the worst.
Do you know Him?
fruitland04 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2007, 12:21 PM   #15
Tech Fanatic
 
SlamMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 847
Default

I find it easiest to think of "droop" as chassis up travel from a resting position. The more it can travel up the more weight it can transfer to the opposite end of the chassis.
__________________
Michael H

OnRoadColorado.com
Colorado On Road RC Club
SlamMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
droop settings on tc3 Lord_Darkhelmet Electric On-Road 5 02-05-2006 09:32 PM
setting droop on droop blocks mrgsr Nitro On-Road 3 01-08-2006 07:01 PM
droop settings Team-RTR Australian Racing 13 10-21-2004 04:36 AM
Droop Settings? grymg Electric On-Road 16 09-23-2004 02:23 AM
droop settings Alvin Electric On-Road 5 10-02-2001 05:08 PM



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. It is currently 10:24 PM.


Powered By: vBulletin v3.9.2.1
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Advertise Content © 2001-2011 RCTech.net