R/C Tech Forums

Go Back   R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Electric On-Road

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 04-09-2007, 09:02 PM   #16
Tech Adept
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 150
Trader Rating: 4 (100%+)
Default

As stated above the twister lathes are good even though they are older. The orion lathe is also a great lathe. I personally have had a twister for about 3 years and picked it up for $61. Just check ebay.

Tanner
Tannerb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2007, 09:05 PM   #17
Regional Moderator
 
Darkseid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: At my computer, duh...
Posts: 9,033
Trader Rating: 8 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by atxgman
I am looking to get a comm lathe, but I am not sure which to get. I am looking to spend under $100, or atleast close to this area. What seems to be popular? Any info would really help.

thanks
As has been mentioned (and offered ) here, the best deal you will find is for a used Cobra Lathe with diamond bit. Chances are you can find one for right around $100 with a powerbase.

Theres a lot of them out there with so many people switching to Brushless and no longer needing them.

Just keep an eye on the boards, have a paypal account, and be ready to buy as soon as you see what you want, and you'll find a great deal.
__________________
TLR 22...Tamiya F104...
Darkseid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2007, 09:32 PM   #18
Tech Initiate
 
Torres's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 38
Default

let me know i will take paypal best deal buy far
Torres is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2007, 09:48 PM   #19
Tech Elite
 
JasonC's Avatar
R/C Tech Charter Subscriber
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: oceanside ca
Posts: 4,099
Trader Rating: 120 (100%+)
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tc4isthebest
the best lathe on the market is the reedy lathe, good luck finding one. The reason is its made from real tool steal , so it heighty and the tallerents is perfit. the second is easyer to find its the twister lathe . do not just buy a new lathe , they are made of bad metal trust me on that. A good lathe is worth the wait just look around. I was sponserd by reedy and mike reedy made me one out of parts he had around the shop. wow it cut so good, before that i had a cobra what a piece . so where all this is gowing is i was looking all the time for a second one and i got one of rctech. they made them back in the day and some dudes still have them and they are finding them and selling them. remember reedy lathe and the twister lathe only
whats up Factory ...........

i have had almost every popular lathe you can think of

as for best bang for the Buck the Orion wins hands down, the main feature that the orion lathe ha over all the rest is that it has it has an adjustable stop for both the carrage and armeture ( i have a Reedy lathe but it is more of a collectable for me...
__________________
#60 of the Original 100
If your not part of the solution
Your part of the problem !
JasonC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2007, 10:03 PM   #20
Tech Addict
 
RussB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 736
Send a message via MSN to RussB
Default

all lathes are not created equally. v- or u-groove lathes are far superior to bearing lathes. the key things to look for are:
smooth side to side action
solid bit attachment
adjustable guides (good for when things start to wear)
pinned blocks (2 pins per block)
standard size bits (bits are dirt cheap from mcmaster or grainger)
v or u grooves guides
adjustable head

and spend some time up front making sure the lathe cuts smooth and most importantly straight. cut a few old comms and measure the diameter in various places and make sure it's the same.
RussB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2007, 09:59 AM   #21
Tech Master
 
Big B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Kent, WA
Posts: 1,170
Trader Rating: 4 (100%+)
Default

Also alot of people will tell you that a Diamond bit is the best, this is not so, a carbide bit will cut just as good as a diamond one. Here is a quote directly from one of the greatest motor builders ever Big Jim Greenemeyer, "April 14, 2002
Sharpening Carbide Bits for Truing Comms


DIAMOND BITS VERSES CARBIDE

FOR YOUR PIT LATHE.

Choosing A Bit

First, the benefits of carbide supercede that of a diamond. Here's why. If you've never used a diamond tool bit before, you will probably chip it before you figure out how to set it up. Then you won't know it's chipped and you'll keep trying and trying and you'll look like Big Jim and Hank by the time you stop pulling your hair out. They chip very easily. Then you're out of a bit of money and have a whole lot of frustration ahead and behind you. Diamond bits are for experienced pit lathe users or machinists. I have been cutting toy motor comms for 30 years and I use carbide bits.

Diamonds can go bad if you take too big a cut, if you hit the tabs, even if it was cutting fine when you packed it away, a diamond bit can be bad the next time you take it out. Don't ask me why. I have even chipped a diamond just by using the wrong kind of brush to clear the chips away. I figured out later that the steel band around the small paint brush I was using must have hit the tip.

And no two diamond bits are the same as far as setup goes. Some bits need no shims. Others of the same brand and type will require 2 shims. Don't ask me why on that either. Carbide bits of the same brand always seem to setup the same. Another reason to use carbide is when it's dull, the finish looks like crap. A diamond will just start cutting out-of-round and you won't know it until your start putting your motors together because the finish looks fine.

Unless you are extremely experienced, stay away from diamond bits. Use carbide until you gain that experience. Then you can either buy a tool sharpener like I did to do the job right, keep honing the tip with a diamond file until it is so distorted it (you unintentionally change the angles a little each time if you won't work anymore then sharpen by hand), throw it away and start with a new $4 bit or use a diamond. Here's the tool sharpener I use. I've had it since 1980 and it still works fine. www.glendo.com.

CHOOSING THE RIGHT CARBIDE BIT

The best place to buy carbide bits is McMaster-Carr www.McMaster.com. They are cheap and provide excellent service and on-line ordering and support. Or if you have a machinist supply close to you, do that. Try the phone book.

To see if you need a left hand cutting or right hand cutting, see which way your lathe trues toward the tabs. But remember, your bit is installed upside-down so it will be backwards to what you have to order. Remember that most of the machining world cuts with bits right side up. So if your lathe cuts from right to left like my Integy Xipp or my old Cobra, you'll need a left hand bit. The old Twister lathes cut from right to left so they'll need a right hand bit.

On page 2327 of their on-line catalog, you'll see a bunch of different bits of different angles. Unless you have a tool bit sharpener, get the AR series, either R for right hand cutting or L for left hand cutting. Also get the "4" series for non-ferrous (no steel) cutting. And ALL pit lathes use a 1/4" shank. Don't get any other size even though it would fit in your holder. The point will be in the wrong place.

So if I were ordering tool bits for my Integy Xipp, I would want an AL4 bit #3367A131.

HAND SHARPENING YOUR CARBIDE TOOL BIT.

OK, the #1 rule when hand honing with a diamond file is, NEVER, EVER FILE THE TOP OF THE CARBIDE PIECE. If you get this part even slightly rounded, it will have to be sharpened with a tool sharpener because you can never cut it back far enough by hand to make it flat again. Even if you do, it will likely be at the wrong angle. There's no need to hone this part of the bit anyway.

The bit cuts from a sharp point formed by the convergence (coming together) of three angles on the bit. A new bit comes rounded on the point. It will work this way because it's uses the top sharp edge to cut with. But when this gets dull, you want to sharpen it to a point. When honing by hand, most of your work will be on the angled side (the part of the bit not 90 degrees from the commutator). However, you must lightly touch up the 90-degree side because of the burrs left from honing the angled side. Just a couple of strokes will do it (boy, I've heard that before, ha).

Try not to change any of the angles; file the bit with that in mind. If you have a good magnifying glass it's helpfully in inspecting the point during the sharpening process. Use the #400 grit file (also available from McCaster-Carr) if you have some material to cut away and then touch it up with the #600 file. It may take a little practice to get it cutting the way you like it but just think of all the advantages you'll have over a diamond and if you screw anything up, it's only 4 bucks! "
Big B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2007, 10:54 AM   #22
Tech Addict
 
Patriiick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: France, Land of the French Fries.
Posts: 587
Trader Rating: 3 (100%+)
Default

best lather ever made: Twister lathe !!
Sad they discontinued long time ago
Patriiick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2007, 03:22 PM   #23
Tech Initiate
 
prhess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Posts: 33
Default

TWISTER FOR SURE. Here are the instructions for the twister lathe.

http://www3.telus.net/public/rhess/L...he%20Hobby.htm

Randy
prhess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2007, 03:36 PM   #24
Tech Elite
 
CristianTabush's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Houston
Posts: 2,839
Trader Rating: 11 (100%+)
Default

I received the XIPP performance lathe 2 and I can say I was very impressed. I've used anything from a twister (I still own one) to a Hudy executive lathe and the XIPP is a great buy. The main reason why is because you can cut anything from 130 size (mini-z) all the way to a 550 size (E-maxx). So for the versatility factor, I'd spend my money there. Reason being is because I need it for mini-z, 1/18th and 1/10th scale motors. It has a really nice knob system to adjust to the length of an armature and then once squared up, it locks in place with 2- 3mm set-screws.

As mentioned before, all lathes work if set-up properly. The Cobra is great, the Twister WAS great (since you can't get it except for 2nd hand) and the Hudys are awesome as well. The Reedy is the closest to the Twister and I really don't have any experience with the Orion. Just make sure your guides are nice and square and also tight so that there is no vibration and you should get glass-smooth finishes with any lathe.
__________________
REFLEX RACING/ RSD/ GIZMO RACING USA/ HOBBYWING/ AXON/ QTEQ/ TEAM PRIME
CristianTabush is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2007, 05:12 PM   #25
Tech Elite
 
wallyedmonds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Brampton ont canada
Posts: 3,662
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big B
Also alot of people will tell you that a Diamond bit is the best, this is not so, a carbide bit will cut just as good as a diamond one. Here is a quote directly from one of the greatest motor builders ever Big Jim Greenemeyer, "April 14, 2002
Sharpening Carbide Bits for Truing Comms


DIAMOND BITS VERSES CARBIDE

FOR YOUR PIT LATHE.

Choosing A Bit

First, the benefits of carbide supercede that of a diamond. Here's why. If you've never used a diamond tool bit before, you will probably chip it before you figure out how to set it up. Then you won't know it's chipped and you'll keep trying and trying and you'll look like Big Jim and Hank by the time you stop pulling your hair out. They chip very easily. Then you're out of a bit of money and have a whole lot of frustration ahead and behind you. Diamond bits are for experienced pit lathe users or machinists. I have been cutting toy motor comms for 30 years and I use carbide bits.

Diamonds can go bad if you take too big a cut, if you hit the tabs, even if it was cutting fine when you packed it away, a diamond bit can be bad the next time you take it out. Don't ask me why. I have even chipped a diamond just by using the wrong kind of brush to clear the chips away. I figured out later that the steel band around the small paint brush I was using must have hit the tip.

And no two diamond bits are the same as far as setup goes. Some bits need no shims. Others of the same brand and type will require 2 shims. Don't ask me why on that either. Carbide bits of the same brand always seem to setup the same. Another reason to use carbide is when it's dull, the finish looks like crap. A diamond will just start cutting out-of-round and you won't know it until your start putting your motors together because the finish looks fine.

Unless you are extremely experienced, stay away from diamond bits. Use carbide until you gain that experience. Then you can either buy a tool sharpener like I did to do the job right, keep honing the tip with a diamond file until it is so distorted it (you unintentionally change the angles a little each time if you won't work anymore then sharpen by hand), throw it away and start with a new $4 bit or use a diamond. Here's the tool sharpener I use. I've had it since 1980 and it still works fine. www.glendo.com.

CHOOSING THE RIGHT CARBIDE BIT

The best place to buy carbide bits is McMaster-Carr www.McMaster.com. They are cheap and provide excellent service and on-line ordering and support. Or if you have a machinist supply close to you, do that. Try the phone book.

To see if you need a left hand cutting or right hand cutting, see which way your lathe trues toward the tabs. But remember, your bit is installed upside-down so it will be backwards to what you have to order. Remember that most of the machining world cuts with bits right side up. So if your lathe cuts from right to left like my Integy Xipp or my old Cobra, you'll need a left hand bit. The old Twister lathes cut from right to left so they'll need a right hand bit.

On page 2327 of their on-line catalog, you'll see a bunch of different bits of different angles. Unless you have a tool bit sharpener, get the AR series, either R for right hand cutting or L for left hand cutting. Also get the "4" series for non-ferrous (no steel) cutting. And ALL pit lathes use a 1/4" shank. Don't get any other size even though it would fit in your holder. The point will be in the wrong place.

So if I were ordering tool bits for my Integy Xipp, I would want an AL4 bit #3367A131.

HAND SHARPENING YOUR CARBIDE TOOL BIT.

OK, the #1 rule when hand honing with a diamond file is, NEVER, EVER FILE THE TOP OF THE CARBIDE PIECE. If you get this part even slightly rounded, it will have to be sharpened with a tool sharpener because you can never cut it back far enough by hand to make it flat again. Even if you do, it will likely be at the wrong angle. There's no need to hone this part of the bit anyway.

The bit cuts from a sharp point formed by the convergence (coming together) of three angles on the bit. A new bit comes rounded on the point. It will work this way because it's uses the top sharp edge to cut with. But when this gets dull, you want to sharpen it to a point. When honing by hand, most of your work will be on the angled side (the part of the bit not 90 degrees from the commutator). However, you must lightly touch up the 90-degree side because of the burrs left from honing the angled side. Just a couple of strokes will do it (boy, I've heard that before, ha).

Try not to change any of the angles; file the bit with that in mind. If you have a good magnifying glass it's helpfully in inspecting the point during the sharpening process. Use the #400 grit file (also available from McCaster-Carr) if you have some material to cut away and then touch it up with the #600 file. It may take a little practice to get it cutting the way you like it but just think of all the advantages you'll have over a diamond and if you screw anything up, it's only 4 bucks! "
diamond is better for ppl that dont know a lathe to good.
sorry i just had to say it
and my dit is about 15 years old and iv hever had to touch it
a carbide bit you have to sharpen it.
but i will say you can get a real nice cut from a carbide bit but you have to know what you are doing.
wallyedmonds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2007, 09:23 PM   #26
Tech Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 317
Default

jason ccccccccccccccc in the house

whats up men , how the hell are you and whats new in tc
tc4isthebest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2007, 09:25 PM   #27
Tech Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 317
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonC
whats up Factory ...........

i have had almost every popular lathe you can think of

as for best bang for the Buck the Orion wins hands down, the main feature that the orion lathe ha over all the rest is that it has it has an adjustable stop for both the carrage and armeture ( i have a Reedy lathe but it is more of a collectable for me...

did you have the lrp lathe , and do you still have one . come on jason how you gowing to hate on reedy. the orion lathe is for little girls , who do not knwo how to use a lathe , back in the day we got our holes in our jeans form working not just buy then in the story you dig
tc4isthebest is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Trinity Tru Lathe Motor Comm Cutter Lathe maximum R/C Items: For Sale/Trade 4 05-14-2007 04:56 PM
Hudy comm lathe and Fantom comm lathe ACEDEAN R/C Items: For Sale/Trade 0 05-02-2007 11:27 AM
XIPP Super Lathe 3 / (pics) comm lathe diamond bit evostyle R/C Items: For Sale/Trade 8 12-01-2006 12:53 PM
Trade EXTREME COMM LATHE(Hudy)for MUCH MORE COMM LATHE JoeyE R/C Items: For Sale/Trade 0 05-07-2006 09:49 AM
Tire Lathe, Motor Dyno, Comm Lathe For Sale 17Mark71 R/C Items: For Sale/Trade 8 06-05-2005 01:07 PM



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -7. It is currently 09:22 AM.


Powered By: vBulletin v3.9.2.1
Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Advertise Content © 2001-2011 RCTech.net