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"cooked batteries"

"cooked batteries"

Old 03-15-2007, 11:23 PM
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Everywhere I look people say be careful not to get batteries too hot when you make your own packs. Before it didnt matter but now that I actually want to build my own it has me worried.

Just how easy is it to "cook" a battery, and what exactly happens if this occurs? How can you tell if your battery is damaged? And if it is damaged is it reversible or do I have to throw it away and buy a new cell?
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Old 03-15-2007, 11:46 PM
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just get a 60 watt iron, and some patients, its VERY simple once u know how..... but just be as quick as u cn soldering, tin everything, and maybe practice b4 on wire or something
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Old 03-16-2007, 12:13 AM
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Heat is a battery's enemy. Soldering puts a lot of heat into the cell, and too much can cause permanent damage to it. The rule of thumb I've heard most is 8 seconds of heat max. Much more than that and the cells will get very hot, very quickly. Also only do one end at a time and let the cell cool completely before doing the other end.
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Old 03-16-2007, 02:36 AM
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Originally Posted by h4nsm0l3m4n
...and what exactly happens if this occurs? ...
i had an IB cell exploded, it fizzled out some smokes...i grabbed the pack...tossed outta room...turned my back and kaboom both cap ends and cell jacket were gone...only some wire mesh and black stains left
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Old 03-16-2007, 03:36 AM
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Originally Posted by KoE
i had an IB cell exploded, it fizzled out some smokes...i grabbed the pack...tossed outta room...turned my back and kaboom both cap ends and cell jacket were gone...only some wire mesh and black stains left
WOW!!!!!
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Old 03-16-2007, 05:49 AM
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e same thing happen in a local race in singapore.

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Old 03-16-2007, 07:11 AM
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I noticed in my older packs, the cells in the 'end' of pack, were the corally conectors go, are usually the first to die. I dont think it a is a coincidence that those are also the cells that get hotter when building (because it can be hard to solder those connectors properly and because i used to use a cheap iron).

Given that said, i do believe that a good solder job, with a proper iron shouldnt put more temperature in a cell that what they are used to, at least in modified
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Old 03-16-2007, 07:26 AM
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Default building packs

I've built many a pack (although I am trying to switch to LIPO.) I use an 80 watt weller iron (sp80) that comes with a 1/4" tip (iron cost about $35.)

The iron is great for batteries because it has a large chisel tip. Because of the power of the iron, the solder flows almost instantly. It never takes any longer than 3-4 seconds to put any bar or corally connector on to the pack. On the downside, the iron is almost too big and powerful for everyday track use (I use connectors anyway.)

In terms of the corally connector, the best thing to do is to get someone or something to hold the tube in place. First put a little solder onto the end of cell. Next put solder onto the iron and put the tip at an angle onto one side of the tube so that the iron is touching the tube and the battery. Next wait about 2-3 seconds while applying solder to the other side. Once the solder flows, you are done. The key is to hold the tube in place while applying solder to the other side.

Using this iron, I have never had the battery get hot while soldering. I also use lead free solder, so with leaded solder, it should be even faster (lead solder flows faster and at a lower temperature.)

One more thing, when you solder batteries, make sure the area is ventilated. The easiest thing to do is to either solder outside, or put a small very weak fan that blows just behind the work area, or if you have one or will be doing a lot of batteries, wear a fume mask. (I use the fume mask and solder batteries outside, but I am a little anal about safety.)
Attached Thumbnails "cooked batteries"-we-sp80.jpg  

Last edited by billjacobs; 03-16-2007 at 10:17 AM.
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Old 03-16-2007, 09:04 AM
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I used one of these for the longest time before I got a hakko. It works excellent, and you cant beat the price.
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Old 03-16-2007, 10:27 AM
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Thanks for the tips guys. I built the packs last night using a 60W soldering iron. I only realized that I bought lead-free solder for the job when I was halfway done, which would explain why I had to heat the solder more than I was used to. I will probably upgrade to an 80W just to be on the safe side.

Hopefully the packs turn out ok, but I'm still curious to know just how easily are the packs damaged by the iron. Does even the slightest extra heat damage them? How much room for error do I have?

Also since these are my first packs I'm concerned about finding the damaged cells before they explode on me any idea how to discern normal cells from ones i screwed up?
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Old 03-16-2007, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by billjacobs
I've built many a pack (although I am trying to switch to LIPO.) I use an 80 watt weller iron (sp80) that comes with a 1/4" tip (iron cost about $35.)

The iron is great for batteries because it has a large chisel tip. Because of the power of the iron, the solder flows almost instantly. It never takes any longer than 3-4 seconds to put any bar or corally connector on to the pack. On the downside, the iron is almost too big and powerful for everyday track use (I use connectors anyway.)

In terms of the corally connector, the best thing to do is to get someone or something to hold the tube in place. First put a little solder onto the end of cell. Next put solder onto the iron and put the tip at an angle onto one side of the tube so that the iron is touching the tube and the battery. Next wait about 2-3 seconds while applying solder to the other side. Once the solder flows, you are done. The key is to hold the tube in place while applying solder to the other side.

Using this iron, I have never had the battery get hot while soldering. I also use lead free solder, so with leaded solder, it should be even faster (lead solder flows faster and at a lower temperature.)

One more thing, when you solder batteries, make sure the area is ventilated. The easiest thing to do is to either solder outside, or put a small very weak fan that blows just behind the work area, or if you have one or will be doing a lot of batteries, wear a fume mask. (I use the fume mask and solder batteries outside, but I am a little anal about safety.)
I have this one also. Worked a treat. Dont need to solder any more cells up now though :P
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Old 03-16-2007, 11:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Jimbo Morris
I used one of these for the longest time before I got a hakko. It works excellent, and you cant beat the price.

i just got one to hold me over, is it any good? and how long did it last?


and lw, any one have any gp cells blow up? i have only heard ib's doing this
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Old 03-17-2007, 07:36 AM
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Back in the old daze, we only ever soldered cells which were uncharged. Might be something in that ancient knowledge?
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Old 03-17-2007, 08:22 AM
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Default 4200 IB cells

I assembled 3 4200 packs yesterday.
Equalized them on the Novak and then charged.
Two of the packs did beautiful but one started to vent.
Max I'm getting out of the pack is 7.35 Volts.

I noticed when I trayed it again that two cells were not lighting up. I'm thinking these cells need replacing, or are they just lazy slacking cells?

Don
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Old 03-17-2007, 05:21 PM
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Default hurrayyyyyyyyyyyyyy

I trayed the pack in question again after letting it sit overnite.

The pack fully charges now.

These cells are a different science.
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