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Pantoura, 1/10 Pan Car, 2S LiPo, Brushless, Tips and Tricks.

Pantoura, 1/10 Pan Car, 2S LiPo, Brushless, Tips and Tricks.

Old 03-24-2007, 02:15 PM
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Boomer- The back end is getting more solid and crash resistant. The front end is hopefully reducing wear at the ball pivots by eliminating them. Wear here seems to kill some traction on my car.


My Nephew, James, finished the right side Panhard bar mount. Some benefits of the mount are that it can hold the panhad bar very low for a low roll center. It reinforces the pod extension behind the spur. It is shim adjustable for Panhard bar height as is the mount on the left which I showed in my previous post. It came out nice. It is a little on the beefy side. We can slim down some of the thicknesses on the second car.
John
Attached Thumbnails Pantoura, 1/10 Pan Car, 2S LiPo, Brushless, Tips and Tricks.-right-side-panhard-bar-mount.jpg  
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Old 03-25-2007, 07:32 PM
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Hey, John, just thought I'd check in with you about my debut with the I Force, all I can say is ,, I love it. It was a dream to drive fast, I was allowed to run with the 10th nitro cars, I was running 4 cells, 19t brushed. after I got the new car bugs out of it, the nitro boys couldn't keep up. It was a blast. and generated a lot of interest, Maybe some more will get one. Consider me a believer of simplicity now.

Bob
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Old 03-26-2007, 08:42 PM
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Originally Posted by losi nut
Hey, John, just thought I'd check in with you about my debut with the I Force, all I can say is ,, I love it. It was a dream to drive fast, I was allowed to run with the 10th nitro cars, I was running 4 cells, 19t brushed. after I got the new car bugs out of it, the nitro boys couldn't keep up. It was a blast. and generated a lot of interest, Maybe some more will get one. Consider me a believer of simplicity now.

Bob
That's what I like to hear!

-E
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Old 03-26-2007, 08:48 PM
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I do however have some bad news about the I-Force chassis. Effectively today, we will no longer be selling new kits with the silver carbon fiber. We will be changing to black carbon once the stock on hand is exhausted, same thickness, same design, same everything. We will continue to support the silver chassis that have been sold with spare parts for the long term future. The silver carbon fiber material has become VERY hard to obtain in the very recent past.

This is a situation that is simply out of my hands and I appologize for that.

Eric Dimmick
Darkside Motorsports
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Old 03-26-2007, 10:03 PM
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Bob-Thanks for the track report. Sounds like you did a good job of setting the car up. We especially appreciate the pics and width details.

Eric-Thanks for the update.

I thought I would tinker with a NiMH setup that would fit with the three link rear suspension and also give us a very good rear weight bias. I have installed a shortened Losi JRXS Aluminum battery tray to mount a four cell pack with cells aligned longways to the chassis. I have put the two extra cells forward tranverse to the chassis. The Pantoura chassis has two predrilled holes so the forward cells can be retained with a battery strap. I have it semi installed and mocked up for the photo to see if it will work. This battery tray would hold 4200 cells, so I think they will fit this way as well. This tray will give a .4 ounce weight penalty. A chassis could be made with milled slots for the batteries instead of the tray. The batteries will sit a little high. I think with the three link that this is not so bad as the suspension heavily loads the front tires with forward weight transfer on corner entry giving great cornering traction.

The rear cells are only mm's in front of the motor. Weight balance 4 ounces more in the back. Body Off. Weight 44 ounces body on. These are older batteries though.
Attached Thumbnails Pantoura, 1/10 Pan Car, 2S LiPo, Brushless, Tips and Tricks.-three-link-6-cell-nimh-resized.jpg  

Last edited by John Stranahan; 03-31-2007 at 12:01 AM.
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Old 03-26-2007, 10:24 PM
  #1041  
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John you got PM
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Old 03-27-2007, 02:19 PM
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stranahan,
I absolutley love your car.

I want to build a pan car for velo racing. needs a floating rear and shock suspension front. I have looked at the Pantoura at CRC. it looks provising.

Do you know of Marty is well and if he will be releasing his pan car?

Or do you have a referral where I can get this built?

thanks,
Wayne
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Old 03-27-2007, 03:58 PM
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Wayne-Thanks. Send me a PM reply. Marty is not well at the moment so production may be well in the future. My Narrow pan car design on which his is based would probably be the best for Velodrome.

John

Last edited by John Stranahan; 03-30-2007 at 11:57 PM.
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Old 03-30-2007, 11:55 PM
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About Screws

I looked up some data on screws at http://www.mcmaster.com/ . So whats the deal on stainless screws. Their main benefit is corrosion resistance and appearance. Here are some tensile strengths.

Alloy Steel Screw (Black Oxide Finish) #4-40 x 3/16 144,000 pounds per square inch (probably about grade 8)

18-8 Stainless Steel Screw #4-40 x 3/16 77,000 pounds per square inch
3-16 Stainless Steel Screw #4-40 x 3/16 70,000 pounds per square inch more corrosion resistant than 18-8.

The alloy steel black oxide finish screws are about 2 times as strong.

I have also noted that most of the time a stainless steel product (screw, knife blade, etc) is slightly softer than an alloy steel one designed for the same purpose. This makes a stainless screws weaker in the socket area. That is where my screws will fail on occasion.

So use a a black alloy steel screw for strength
Use a stainless steel screw for appearance and corrosion resistance. The two types are roughly the same price.
Use a titanium screw for slightly less strength, good flexibility, and light weight.
use an Aluminum screw for the lightest weight but be sure and run the steel tap screw into the hole first or the Aluminum screw will break on assembly. They are not real strong. Save them for areas of the kit that don't need strength.
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Old 03-31-2007, 06:39 AM
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do you suppose the black oxide screws that come standard in most kits are really grade #8? the only time i have ever substituted screws personally was for quality reasons.. on more than one occasion i have received screws without threads or heads.. nice..
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Old 03-31-2007, 08:00 AM
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I believe the black Losi and Associated Screws are this 144, 000 psi quality. Grade 8 is 150,00 psi minimum so they are about grade 8 in quality. If they were mild steel the 1/16 inch socket would not hold up.

Last edited by John Stranahan; 03-31-2007 at 08:11 AM.
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Old 03-31-2007, 09:18 AM
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Originally Posted by John Stranahan
About Screws

I looked up some data on screws at http://www.mcmaster.com/ . So whats the deal on stainless screws. Their main benefit is corrosion resistance and appearance. Here are some tensile strengths.

Alloy Steel Screw (Black Oxide Finish) #4-40 x 3/16 144,000 pounds per square inch (probably about grade 8)

18-8 Stainless Steel Screw #4-40 x 3/16 77,000 pounds per square inch
3-16 Stainless Steel Screw #4-40 x 3/16 70,000 pounds per square inch more corrosion resistant than 18-8.

The alloy steel black oxide finish screws are about 2 times as strong.

I have also noted that most of the time a stainless steel product (screw, knife blade, etc) is slightly softer than an alloy steel one designed for the same purpose. This makes a stainless screws weaker in the socket area. That is where my screws will fail on occasion.

So use a a black alloy steel screw for strength
Use a stainless steel screw for appearance and corrosion resistance. The two types are roughly the same price.
Use a titanium screw for slightly less strength, good flexibility, and light weight.
use an Aluminum screw for the lightest weight but be sure and run the steel tap screw into the hole first or the Aluminum screw will break on assembly. They are not real strong. Save them for areas of the kit that don't need strength.
Keep in mind though that most of these screws will never see a loading even close to what you've noted above. Stainless and aluminum are fine for this type of application.


-E
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Old 03-31-2007, 12:11 PM
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Eric-I agree that stainless are fine. The only place the screw sees a high loading is in the socket on removal. I hate it when these strip out. All of my gun screws have gone over to torx heads to solve this problem. I don't see these available in the many lengths required.
John

Last edited by John Stranahan; 03-31-2007 at 12:26 PM.
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Old 03-31-2007, 12:20 PM
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Torx are great, I use them all the time at work and rarely have a problem. If I do, it's usually the tool that braks instead of the screw stripping out. Robertson screws are even better but I doubt you'll find them that small or even at all.
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Old 03-31-2007, 11:06 PM
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Originally Posted by John Stranahan
Eric-I agree that stainless are fine. The only place the screw sees a high loading is in the socket on removal. I hate it when these strip out. All of my gun screws have gone over to torx heads to solve this problem. I don't see these available in the many lengths required.
John

Hey John get a hold of Corally USA and they can get you the torx head screw you want. They have all sizes. They run them in there touring cars.

http://www.corallyusa.com/2005/core.htm

Later,
Joe
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