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Old 05-20-2006, 07:05 PM   #16
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Just a tip.....anytime something that is threaded is made of something other than good ol' carbon steel, use oil or grease on the threads. Will make life much easier in the long run. Even the carbon steel will benefit.

Aluminum, Titanium, and Stainless Steel all have the wonderful ability to weld itself to the mating threads with the mere force of turning them together with a screwdriver, allen key, or regular wrench. To avoid this amazing phenomenon, use oil or grease.....
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Old 05-20-2006, 09:17 PM   #17
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Thanks for all the replies,

Because I have heard of some ppl's Ti screws breaking, (they were not tamiya screws though)... which makes me worry...

I will definately go w/ Ti screws... (if my wallet will support it) I think this is the classiest shaft car to be on the market... I will try and treat it right

Ti alloy actually is stronger than Ti by itself (cool learnt something)...
I won't mind a little bit more mass and sacrifice a bit of looks if it means i get a whole lot more strength...

Manning: can u elaborate the use of oil?? because most people have told me to apply threadlock to my screws...

When I had my ta04-TRF, (my first car), the biggest problem was having screws undoing themselves due to vibrations in the chassis while driving... (when I didn't use any threadlock)...

I have never owned any Al or Ti screws... or Al bulkheads for that matter... I don't want to break my car before i even drive it... so i am just going to hammer this question to death
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Old 05-21-2006, 10:16 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manning
Just a tip.....anytime something that is threaded is made of something other than good ol' carbon steel, use oil or grease on the threads. Will make life much easier in the long run. Even the carbon steel will benefit.

Aluminum, Titanium, and Stainless Steel all have the wonderful ability to weld itself to the mating threads with the mere force of turning them together with a screwdriver, allen key, or regular wrench. To avoid this amazing phenomenon, use oil or grease.....

It is that amazing ability that holds the screws in place. If you lubricate the screw threads, you will find them backing themselves out.

Friction is what makes a screw work.

Just don't overtighten them.
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Old 05-21-2006, 11:13 AM   #19
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Just put a little drop of oil or a tiny dab of grease on the threads prior to assembly. No special, lubes just whatever is handy (well maybe not silcone grease). I do this with everything except when the screw is going into plastic. Makes subsequent disassembly much nicer.

Feel free to use threadlocker on a nitro car. I never use anything but oil on threads of an electric car. And they don't back out either. Been doing it for literally decades on RC cars and airplanes, and full size motorcycles and cars, including my drag race cars.

There is a big difference between galling (localized welding of threads) and simple friction.
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Old 05-21-2006, 11:31 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manning
Just put a little drop of oil or a tiny dab of grease on the threads prior to assembly. No special, lubes just whatever is handy (well maybe not silcone grease). I do this with everything except when the screw is going into plastic. Makes subsequent disassembly much nicer.

Feel free to use threadlocker on a nitro car. I never use anything but oil on threads of an electric car. And they don't back out either. Been doing it for literally decades on RC cars and airplanes, and full size motorcycles and cars, including my drag race cars.

There is a big difference between galling (localized welding of threads) and simple friction.
I agree 100%, Anyone with an Xray should be all to familiar with the "frozen" screw.. I never use thread lock on an electric car..Never. Before I race I always check my car out..It's called maintenance..
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Old 05-21-2006, 12:29 PM   #21
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Ti screws, forget aluminium ones, heads strip and the anodizin comes off when scratched. Ti screws are 100times stronger and make sparkes if your chassis 'bottom-outs'

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Old 05-21-2006, 05:53 PM   #22
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would bearing oil work?
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Old 05-21-2006, 06:39 PM   #23
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I have use blue threadlock in both of my nitro and electric cars and never had them weld. It seems that the threadlock prevents metal welding together. If you don't want to threadlock and are concern about welding, you can put a dab of silicone gasket around the bevel part of the screw. This will secure the screw and will be easy to remove. We use to this when 1/8 nitro chassis were made out of fiberglass (70's and 80's). I use ti screws above the chassis and steel screws on the bottom. In my illogical mind, I'm keeping the heavy weight as low as possible.
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Old 05-21-2006, 11:08 PM   #24
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Interesting.. I am beginning to see 2 sides developing:
1. threadlock
2. oil

One to solve the frozen screw... one to solve the loose screw...

I am thinking they are both right.. for different cars.... anyone know which one is best suitable for tamiya titanium screws?

(just don't wanna findout by losing a couple screws first, or having 2 jammed in the bulkhead)

any constructive comments are welcomed
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Old 05-21-2006, 11:19 PM   #25
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I think the proper term we are looking for is galling, not welding. Antiseize would be the proper thing to use with ti.
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Old 05-22-2006, 08:54 AM   #26
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Those aluminum blue screws are okay, but you just need a good hex driver like Hudy 2mm Hex Driver. I have those blue screws on my TRF415MSX, I don't have any problems like the heads stripping and the blue anodizing scratched. Those blue screws make your car look better!
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Old 05-22-2006, 09:45 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tunnelhead
I think the proper term we are looking for is galling, not welding. Antiseize would be the proper thing to use with ti.
Thanks, I couldn't remember the term. I remember reading in an article in either RC Car or Xtreme, geez, I am getting old. I know this galling happens alot with cyclists.
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