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Drive shaft length

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Drive shaft length

Old 03-27-2020, 04:59 AM
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Default Drive shaft length

Iím sure itís somewhere, but hey why not start a new thread for something other than ďwhatís the bestĒ

driveshaft length? What does it do? All other suspension settings on your car remaining the same, but you changed driveshaft length. How does it effect handling?
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Old 03-27-2020, 08:15 AM
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What's the best driveshaft length?
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Old 03-28-2020, 02:06 AM
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It does nothing, unless you like to believe everything XRAY put in their sales documents, in which case it is an important setup tool that will always make you faster.
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Old 03-28-2020, 03:38 AM
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Shameless plug.
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Old 03-28-2020, 04:04 AM
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Can you change driveshaft length and leave EVERYTHING else the same?
I imagine it does do something, but like most of these costly adjustments, it doesn't matter enough to the 99.9% to make us any faster.
If anything, it slows us up because we're bogging ourselves down with meaningless stuff.
Tire management, even steering, and accurate droop settings make way better use of our time.
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Old 03-28-2020, 05:35 AM
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The only thing i know is there are three shafts length for a typical tamiya chassis and most often it uses 44...Aside from how far the shaft sits in the out drive i dont know if it do anything else....
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Old 03-28-2020, 05:50 AM
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Originally Posted by MC112b View Post
Can you change driveshaft length and leave EVERYTHING else the same?
I imagine it does do something, but like most of these costly adjustments, it doesn't matter enough to the 99.9% to make us any faster.
If anything, it slows us up because we're bogging ourselves down with meaningless stuff.
Tire management, even steering, and accurate droop settings make way better use of our time.
And practice. Be it conventional or unconventional. In the 4 years since I stepped into the racing side. Iíve basically only made pinion/spur and shock oil changes. And have gone from being 8 seconds off to around 1-2 seconds off pace.
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Old 03-28-2020, 08:27 PM
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Im not an expert but if you come up dry on answers you can look up a few things. Driveshafts have a critical length based on on diameter and material. Its basically a vibration and flex thing.

Another tidbit. The angle of the axles or driveshafts creates some forces. I think a down angle wants to pick up on what it is attached to (like a wheel) and an up angle the opposite.
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Old 03-29-2020, 04:26 AM
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The length affects how much the angle of the shaft changes with ride height.

When loaded (accelerating or braking) a driveshaft wants to straighten up. They don't like being at an angle.

A longer shaft will have less angle, and therefore less force, so will be less sensitive to throttle and brake inputs.

I think you'd want a long shaft in high grip to make the car less edgy. In low grip you could use a shorter shaft to gain steering on entry and traction on exit, at the cost of stability. And it will heat the tyres more.

Its a similar adjustment to diff height. Try dropping your diffs and you'll notice the car becomes more sensitive to throttle and brake.
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Old 03-29-2020, 08:08 AM
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... and Tamiya has all these different length to fit all their variety of models.
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Old 03-29-2020, 09:03 PM
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Originally Posted by daleburr View Post
The length affects how much the angle of the shaft changes with ride height.

When loaded (accelerating or braking) a driveshaft wants to straighten up. They don't like being at an angle.

A longer shaft will have less angle, and therefore less force, so will be less sensitive to throttle and brake inputs.

I think you'd want a long shaft in high grip to make the car less edgy. In low grip you could use a shorter shaft to gain steering on entry and traction on exit, at the cost of stability. And it will heat the tyres more.

Its a similar adjustment to diff height. Try dropping your diffs and you'll notice the car becomes more sensitive to throttle and brake.
great simple answer!
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Old 04-01-2020, 11:05 AM
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I thought this thread would be about the center line drive shaft on shaft drive cars (not belt drive cars). In case anyone else was confused, this discussion is about the shaft that runs from the diffs/outdrives to the axles on the car. These shafts are usually part of the entire CVD assembly (shaft + axle) or a dog bone. 4wd drive vehicles with have 4 of these shafts (2 front/2 rear). 2wd independent suspension vehicles will have 2 of these shafts located at the end with the drive wheels.
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Old 04-01-2020, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by IndyRC_Racer View Post
I thought this thread would be about the center line drive shaft on shaft drive cars (not belt drive cars). In case anyone else was confused, this discussion is about the shaft that runs from the diffs/outdrives to the axles on the car. These shafts are usually part of the entire CVD assembly (shaft + axle) or a dog bone. 4wd drive vehicles with have 4 of these shafts (2 front/2 rear). 2wd independent suspension vehicles will have 2 of these shafts located at the end with the drive wheels.

your talking about propshafts
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Old 04-01-2020, 12:14 PM
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Originally Posted by daleburr View Post
The length affects how much the angle of the shaft changes with ride height.

When loaded (accelerating or braking) a driveshaft wants to straighten up. They don't like being at an angle.

A longer shaft will have less angle, and therefore less force, so will be less sensitive to throttle and brake inputs.

I think you'd want a long shaft in high grip to make the car less edgy. In low grip you could use a shorter shaft to gain steering on entry and traction on exit, at the cost of stability. And it will heat the tyres more.

Its a similar adjustment to diff height. Try dropping your diffs and you'll notice the car becomes more sensitive to throttle and brake.

not being expert myself think u hit the nail on the head but also keeping the drive shaft straighter equals less vibration ( plz shot me down if I am wrong )
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