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Onroad 10th Scale Springs

Old 01-29-2020, 10:46 AM
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Default Onroad 10th Scale Springs

I need to compress my springs to label a bunch of springs. Using a drill press and kitchen scale to get as close as I can.

How much compression to get the rating that is advertised in the spec sheets? My guess is 10mm.

Help!
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Old 01-29-2020, 12:27 PM
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Most of the current springs are rated in N/mm. Some older springs are rated in g/mm. Some even older american ones are rated in lb/in.
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Old 01-29-2020, 12:36 PM
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He didn't ask what units to use, he asked how far do the manufacturers compress their springs when testing for spring rate. 10mm should be fine, however, I would recommend you do a measurement at 2mm then at 10mm and subtract the difference and divide by 8mm. That way you take the guess work out of it of what the zero point is.
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Old 01-29-2020, 12:41 PM
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What may be easier is to measure the wire thickness of the individual springs, most spring makers had a standard sheet available to correlate spring wire thickness to spring rating.
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Old 01-29-2020, 12:59 PM
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Originally Posted by DesertRat View Post
What may be easier is to measure the wire thickness of the individual springs, most spring makers had a standard sheet available to correlate spring wire thickness to spring rating.
This way may be easier, and I might add that into my testing. But, none of my springs have a mfg code. So, if spring 1 is from mfg A and spring 2 is from mfg B and the spring wire diameter is the same but the coil rate is different, or the compression in the steel is different, wouldn’t that give a flawed result?

What I’m looking for is to match the 45 or so springs that I have in a box into verified pairs so I can use them with confidence on the same axle.
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Old 01-29-2020, 01:00 PM
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Originally Posted by glennhl View Post
He didn't ask what units to use, he asked how far do the manufacturers compress their springs when testing for spring rate. 10mm should be fine, however, I would recommend you do a measurement at 2mm then at 10mm and subtract the difference and divide by 8mm. That way you take the guess work out of it of what the zero point is.
thatís a lot of math, but a good starting point
Thanks
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Old 01-29-2020, 01:01 PM
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So...... springs have a slight curve at the start, and end of their stroke.

If you want to do this right, you'd take at least 3, if not 5 measurements for the full stroke of the spring.

The rest you have right.
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Old 01-29-2020, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Centerline Racing View Post
I need to compress my springs to label a bunch of springs. Using a drill press and kitchen scale to get as close as I can.

How much compression to get the rating that is advertised in the spec sheets? My guess is 10mm.

Help!
Most on road 1/10 springs are 20mm now, so I wouldn't compress them 10mm to measure. I would do somewhere around 5mm, but it shouldn't matter too much as the springs are linear and should follow Hooke's law. F=kx, k is the spring constant which you are trying to figure out and x is the distance. I would set your kitchen scale to grams, then compress 5mm. The scale may read something like 450 grams, then you divide by 5 to get the spring constant, which would be 90 g/mm. You can test different compression lengths, just divide by the length and the spring constant should remain very close.
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Old 01-29-2020, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by trilerian View Post
Most on road 1/10 springs are 20mm now, so I wouldn't compress them 10mm to measure. I would do somewhere around 5mm, but it shouldn't matter too much as the springs are linear and should follow Hooke's law. F=kx, k is the spring constant which you are trying to figure out and x is the distance. I would set your kitchen scale to grams, then compress 5mm. The scale may read something like 450 grams, then you divide by 5 to get the spring constant, which would be 90 g/mm. You can test different compression lengths, just divide by the length and the spring constant should remain very close.
They "are" linear, once you get past the coil laydown after the first few MM.

You can't trust the other end either, as the coils collapse at the end of travel.
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Old 01-29-2020, 01:20 PM
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This might be obvious, but you can't do this with progressive springs without taking a ton of measurements
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Old 01-29-2020, 01:21 PM
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The company GForce made a spring rating machine. Look up videos and see how they were used.
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Old 01-29-2020, 01:49 PM
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RC Crewcheif has a spring calculator that seems pretty accurate.
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Old 01-29-2020, 02:19 PM
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Feel like doing a little math?

https://www.engineersedge.com/spring_comp_calc_k.htm
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Last edited by glennhl; 01-29-2020 at 07:56 PM.
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Old 01-29-2020, 06:23 PM
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Originally Posted by mooby64 View Post
The company GForce made a spring rating machine. Look up videos and see how they were used.
the G force spring rate machine is not available in the states and I donít want to wait for Asia to ship something into the middle of March. looking for a used one on the WTB forum

Thus, looking for a Back-yard test method to get by.
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Old 01-29-2020, 06:30 PM
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Springs with no marking no coloring or code, just throw them away. Waste of time to check, waste of time to try them on cars. Not to mention how do u check if they are linear or progressive?
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