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Understanding F1 Tuning: Letís break it down

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Understanding F1 Tuning: Letís break it down

Old 04-18-2018, 11:57 AM
  #271  
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Wouldn't using 2 left side hubs on that solid axle create a wheel offset problem? Has anyone done this and actually measure the width and even spacing?
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Old 04-18-2018, 11:59 AM
  #272  
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Well all you have to do is SPACE it properly!
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Old 04-18-2018, 02:31 PM
  #273  
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Use a caliper to measure one end to the other end on your stock ball diff, then space it the same. Without counting the left side clamping hub, I got:

39g = Fenix gear diff
29g = Xray X1 ball diff/carbon axle with friction peg setup
17g = HVRC spool (yes spur already mounted)
7g = HVRC spool alone with no spur/screws

With that said, I tried running my ball diff/friction peg combo with varying degrees of tightness. It got a bit tougher to drive the tighter the diff. I'm not sure if the spool will work out for me. HVRC really lagged on shipping my spool out so I couldn't test it last weekend. The 1/12 spool axle should work for most F1, you will still need to cut the shaft a bit shorter opposite spur side. 1/10th axle was too long and I had to cut both sides to get the proper width with the clamping hubs.
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Last edited by Dan; 04-18-2018 at 02:45 PM.
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Old 04-18-2018, 07:44 PM
  #274  
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If you want to spool up a ball diff with pegs, pinning the axle threads is a must. It's not too hard to do, just use some music wire matched to a small drill bit. drill, insert the wire and CA into place, then cut off the excess and sand it smooth.

On diffs that use a 1/4 x 3/8 bearing for a thrust, replace it with a brass bushing. Easy money. Associated 6630
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Old 04-19-2018, 07:02 PM
  #275  
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Long damper tubes vs short damper tubes?
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Old 04-20-2018, 03:59 AM
  #276  
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Originally Posted by iTz Nicholas72 View Post
Long damper tubes vs short damper tubes?
Incomplete information. Need to also evaluate Tube and piston diameter, and possibly size of grooves in piston. It's possible to go from 2 to 1 tube and go double on the weight lube (double may not be the exact adjustment but it makes the point). The effect your are trying to achieve when changing tubes is to acquire the same damping, this can be achieved by varying the weight lube. Or possibly you are looking to find a different feel which can be found either by changing the quantity OR size of tube OR weight of lube. A good test to see which direction you need would be to run and see how it feels for a few laps, then remove one tube and repeat. If it feels better then you could go lighter in fluid with 2 tubes, if it feels worse, rebuild both tubes with heavier and repeat process.

As for specifics between short or long, build 1 of each and and compare in hand how they feel. One may have less resistance than the other and it could be either, depending on diameters. The only definitive advantage to shorter tubes would be weight reduction (assuming both are made from same material) and possibly a lower center of gravity, both very minimum gains.

Last edited by miller tyme; 04-20-2018 at 04:58 AM.
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Old 04-20-2018, 06:10 AM
  #277  
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Originally Posted by miller tyme View Post
Incomplete information. Need to also evaluate Tube and piston diameter, and possibly size of grooves in piston. It's possible to go from 2 to 1 tube and go double on the weight lube (double may not be the exact adjustment but it makes the point). The effect your are trying to achieve when changing tubes is to acquire the same damping, this can be achieved by varying the weight lube. Or possibly you are looking to find a different feel which can be found either by changing the quantity OR size of tube OR weight of lube. A good test to see which direction you need would be to run and see how it feels for a few laps, then remove one tube and repeat. If it feels better then you could go lighter in fluid with 2 tubes, if it feels worse, rebuild both tubes with heavier and repeat process.

As for specifics between short or long, build 1 of each and and compare in hand how they feel. One may have less resistance than the other and it could be either, depending on diameters. The only definitive advantage to shorter tubes would be weight reduction (assuming both are made from same material) and possibly a lower center of gravity, both very minimum gains.
I should have been more specific. My Roche Evo gives me the option to run the damper tubes long or short. Basically the two ends closer together or more spread out.
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Old 04-20-2018, 07:10 AM
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Originally Posted by iTz Nicholas72 View Post


I should have been more specific. My Roche Evo gives me the option to run the damper tubes long or short. Basically the two ends closer together or more spread out.

Then the only 2 obvious variations would be the amount of piston to tube contact which would just be a minor change in total damping. And a change to angle which again is minimal but potentially noticeable, I try to set all my pan cars so the travel is as linear to the tube angle as possible.
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Old 04-20-2018, 06:11 PM
  #279  
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Originally Posted by iTz Nicholas72 View Post


I should have been more specific. My Roche Evo gives me the option to run the damper tubes long or short. Basically the two ends closer together or more spread out.
It's not about the length, it's about the angle of the tubes. The inner mount will make the tubes stiffer, like going heavier lube, but the difference is small. Think shock angle on a touring car, more verticle = stiffer.
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Old 04-23-2018, 02:39 PM
  #280  
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So I attempted to race my RC10 F6 for the first time this past weekend. At the end of the day on Saturday I stripped the spur gear so I changed it at home. After changing the gear, the diff felt right based how I had been told to set it. Turns out it was too loose. My first qualifier started and my car just rolled slowly forward. I took it back to my table and readjusted everything and tried to test it to make sure it was tight enough. It felt good. Next qualifier, I took it out and my first three laps were the best the car has ever felt. On the fourth lap it was like someone flipped a switch and the car started oversteering badly. I gutted the qualifier out but was not competitive at all. When I took the car back to my table, I noticed that the diff was a lot tighter than when I put it on the track. Can the diff setting change as laps are run (ie heat, etc.)? Is my nylock nut too worn? Any other ideas?
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Old 04-23-2018, 03:44 PM
  #281  
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I have a question also, I and my son are buying RC10F6 F1 cars and was wondering if the optional servo mounting forward and up right is necessary or not, and also I have one with the aluminum chassis and 1 carbon fiber which one would be the best fit for CRC Black Carpet?? thanks for any help on this..
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Old 04-23-2018, 04:00 PM
  #282  
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The carpet guys prefer the aluminum as it's stiffer than the carbon. The servo can be mounted either way--there's more room to move the battery forward if you mount it upright in front--depends on how you want to set your car up.
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Old 04-23-2018, 05:31 PM
  #283  
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what is the advantage of the servo being upright and forward vs. laying down and back per say for the handling of the car, steers better?, barrel rolls easier with the servo upright? just dont need to purchase an extra 30 for each car if it doesn't help.
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:12 PM
  #284  
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Originally Posted by aft53 View Post
So I attempted to race my RC10 F6 for the first time this past weekend. At the end of the day on Saturday I stripped the spur gear so I changed it at home. After changing the gear, the diff felt right based how I had been told to set it. Turns out it was too loose. My first qualifier started and my car just rolled slowly forward. I took it back to my table and readjusted everything and tried to test it to make sure it was tight enough. It felt good. Next qualifier, I took it out and my first three laps were the best the car has ever felt. On the fourth lap it was like someone flipped a switch and the car started oversteering badly. I gutted the qualifier out but was not competitive at all. When I took the car back to my table, I noticed that the diff was a lot tighter than when I put it on the track. Can the diff setting change as laps are run (ie heat, etc.)? Is my nylock nut too worn? Any other ideas?
Check the washers on your thrust bearing and measure their diameters with a set of calipers. They're different diameters and have to be oriented a certain way. Check the manual for the correct position. I've had diffs back off on me when I accidentally installed the washers backwards.
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:25 PM
  #285  
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Yes there is a larger hole on the washer that goes in first---it needs to be there to put the proper pressure on the outer thrust bearing.
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