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Your favorite Tire Sauce recipe

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Old 03-29-2017, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by JAE View Post
That's why I liked the oil of wintergreen and alcohol as a carrier part. Oil of hemorhoid cream (wintergreen) plus rubbing alcohol seems pretty non toxic and would be nice for a quick break in. Although, I'm not opposed to mixing in some diesel or turpentine laying around the house for a quick fix to soften tires when I've got a race 2 hours away in the AM with brand new tires.
smh at the bolded part. Again, these are toys. This stuff isn't permitted in full scale racing where substantial sums of money are on the line, simply due to the health hazards. Yet we have hobbyists doing it on a regular basis without a care in the world, and with absolutely zilch on the line.

Someone help me understand why a little extra grip is worth having your hands and gear soaked in some of the most caustic, poisonous, toxic chemicals known to man (not to mention the inhalation hazards you pose to yourself and the people around you).

I've seen so many people fall prey to some very dangerous rationalizations, too... the most nonsensical of which is the whole "it doesn't smell so it's probably fine" reasoning. Anyone who tells themselves that is in denial. For what it's worth, CO is odorless and tasteless, too.

It also seems racers have a very difficult time with the long game. They think that because they're fine after several months or years, no harm / no foul. I know of guys who used one particular sauce long-term and now have skin so thin they can't even shake your hand without causing bleeding, and they can't walk up a flight of stairs without having to rest.

I swear, some people would cut their big toe off if they thought it would give them an edge with their little 3-pound R/C car.
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Old 03-29-2017, 02:58 PM
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For rubber slicks I always liked sun screen (NO-ADD spf 30). Makes your tires sticky and it smells nice.
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Old 11-16-2017, 01:42 PM
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Did you ever find out or try this recipe?
Originally Posted by JAE View Post
Someone at my track had some sort of blend of diesel, mineral spirits, and wintergreen. Perhaps a few other things. Think it was some go kart recipe. This ring a bell with anyone and anyone know percentages? I've read the wintergreen oil needs some sort of carrier to get into the rubber. I like the idea of wintergreen, as it's what's used in topical ointments and was also considering using wintergreen with rubbing alcohol. Would be nice also to know the diesel/wintergreen/mineral spirits combo for break in. Traction was unreal
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Old 11-16-2017, 11:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Jason B View Post
smh at the bolded part. Again, these are toys. This stuff isn't permitted in full scale racing where substantial sums of money are on the line, simply due to the health hazards. Yet we have hobbyists doing it on a regular basis without a care in the world, and with absolutely zilch on the line.

Someone help me understand why a little extra grip is worth having your hands and gear soaked in some of the most caustic, poisonous, toxic chemicals known to man (not to mention the inhalation hazards you pose to yourself and the people around you).

I've seen so many people fall prey to some very dangerous rationalizations, too... the most nonsensical of which is the whole "it doesn't smell so it's probably fine" reasoning. Anyone who tells themselves that is in denial. For what it's worth, CO is odorless and tasteless, too.

It also seems racers have a very difficult time with the long game. They think that because they're fine after several months or years, no harm / no foul. I know of guys who used one particular sauce long-term and now have skin so thin they can't even shake your hand without causing bleeding, and they can't walk up a flight of stairs without having to rest.

I swear, some people would cut their big toe off if they thought it would give them an edge with their little 3-pound R/C car.
Won't argue with you one bit. Wish traction compound would be outlawed at all tracks. Then we would all be equal and make the tire company's make better tires. I try to find a tire combo and setup that will work without sauce.
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Last edited by Big_Show; 11-16-2017 at 11:53 PM. Reason: tire company's make better tires.
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Old 11-17-2017, 01:02 AM
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Why not just use the softest possible tire compound? If everyone is after a softer tire that's sticky it should be simple as that without the need for all this snake oil.

Although I did once hear that agent orange was the hot ticket for taking off around 5 seconds per lap.
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Old 11-17-2017, 01:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Jason B View Post
It never ceases to amaze me the crap people will expose themselves to just for a tiny bit of grip on a toy car. Most of the stuff being used is pure mystery sauce... while others are mixing belt dressing, diesel fuel, brake cleaner (!), mineral spirits, etc.

Really?
Have not spent much time on a high bite indoor track. Sauce is popular at my track, but I still wonder how much of a benefit it creates. It sure stinks up the place thats for sure.

I am not running sauce at the moment on my Losi 22 4.0 SR. I am still trying to get my feel back after taking a few years off. I don't think I am driving well enough yet to tell the difference. Is sauce really that necessary?

I also wonder because everyone is doing it, even the guys that do not drive well enough to benefit. So it makes me wonder if it will really help me that much in the end.

I guess my question is, as my skills improve, will not using sauce keep me off the podium? Is there an edge I am missing out on?
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Old 11-17-2017, 04:30 AM
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I am 1 year back from a 12 year break. I do not feel I am up to the speed I was 12 years ago yet. But unfortunately most of the time on hard pack clay/hard pack dirt indoors I can tell a difference and see it on my lap times. Wish it was not that way. Other thing that gets me is when tracks are called high bite clay but everybody is still sanding down tire and saucing. So if you need to sand and sauce is it really high bite? 12 years ago I ran indoor clay and we ran pink taper pins on the rear. Washed the tire with simple green and ran it. Took a race day to break in a brand new set and you was good to go, no sanding or sauce. Kinda miss those days. But that was rear motor. I have a B5R and a B6. I get very close to the same lap times out of both buggys, B6 sanded and sauced tires, B5R 2 race days on tires no sauce. Find the same thing with my SC5M and step daughter's SC10. Close on lap times, SC5M sanded and sauced tires, SC10 2 race day tires no sauce. From 85 to 05 only thing my tires ever seen was simple green.
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Old 11-17-2017, 05:46 AM
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belt dressing
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Old 11-17-2017, 07:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Silberpfeil View Post
Why not just use the softest possible tire compound? If everyone is after a softer tire that's sticky it should be simple as that without the need for all this snake oil.
There is much more going on in compounds than hard/soft. On tracks that like "clay" compounds, M4/Super Soft doesn't work at all.

I use Sticky Kicks or WD40 reluctantly. I wish we could get away from it. Our track's surface has enough oil in it that it's become traction compound dependent. You can run without it, but you'll be ~1sec./lap slower, which can drop you one main or more.
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Old 11-17-2017, 07:06 AM
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FDJ yellow dot or mountain dew or just green dot. If you use the yellow dot and place in a bag overnight sometimes tires double in size. So I can't imagine using something stronger, I must be missing something tho if guys make there concoction.

At one of are local tracks soft tires last a day maybe and aren't very grippy. Clay compound suck unless you sauce/break them in. Once clay compound is broke in they last months w/ great traction which I feel makes the track a "high bite" track, not carpet bite but lots of traction rolling high bite.
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Old 01-27-2019, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by rustyus View Post
The teal cap Liquid Wrench stuff was a mixture of lubricating & penetrating oils. It's not made anymore.
Yes it is, Can get it by the case in Canada.
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Old 02-05-2019, 07:15 AM
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Blue Liquid Wrench and good old #2 diesel.
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Old 02-05-2019, 09:16 AM
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I use dawn dish washing to clean green stuff. then coke the tires not pepsi. cokes cheep works great blow dry or rag tap and run
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Old 02-06-2019, 10:23 AM
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https://www.liverc.com/news/special_..._of_RC_Racing/
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Old 02-06-2019, 03:45 PM
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We had that discussion years ago parking lot racing .. .and we went to sugar/soda on the asphalt and sunscreen on the foam tires. Rubber some people used chemicals but most of us just cleaned them as it was hot enough surface so they got soft quick anyways.

Now I am racing indoor clay and I am saucing away with liquid wrench blue and sticky kicks.. I don't feel as bad when I only use sticky kicks (LWB fumes make me feel a bit off) but who knows really what I am breathing in and touching.
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