Receiver antenna Q

Reply

Old 03-06-2012, 11:26 AM
  #1  
Tech Fanatic
Thread Starter
iTrader: (35)
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Honolulu, HI
Posts: 826
Trader Rating: 35 (100%+)
Default Receiver antenna Q

Where do you place the long antennae found on higher-end receivers? I've got an Kyosho fs2 and a Mugen Eco converted to a sc truck, and wanted to upgrade my radio system.

I'm almost embarrassed by the newb question, but I only have experience with Spektrum 300 receivers (with very short antenna) and didn't know if the longer antennas have to actually be exposed outside of the vehicle, and if so, how did folks configure the antenna in the vehicles listed above?

Thanks
Stanford55 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2012, 12:05 PM
  #2  
Tech Master
 
EastCoasterVa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Norfolk, Virginia
Posts: 1,105
Default

Originally Posted by Stanford55 View Post
Where do you place the long antennae found on higher-end receivers? I've got an Kyosho fs2 and a Mugen Eco converted to a sc truck, and wanted to upgrade my radio system.

I'm almost embarrassed by the newb question, but I only have experience with Spektrum 300 receivers (with very short antenna) and didn't know if the longer antennas have to actually be exposed outside of the vehicle, and if so, how did folks configure the antenna in the vehicles listed above?

Thanks
I loosely wind my antenna in the radio box. Make sure not to kink it anywhere.
EastCoasterVa is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2012, 09:58 PM
  #3  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 168
Default

Originally Posted by Stanford55 View Post
Where do you place the long antennae found on higher-end receivers? I've got an Kyosho fs2 and a Mugen Eco converted to a sc truck, and wanted to upgrade my radio system.

I'm almost embarrassed by the newb question, but I only have experience with Spektrum 300 receivers (with very short antenna) and didn't know if the longer antennas have to actually be exposed outside of the vehicle, and if so, how did folks configure the antenna in the vehicles listed above?

Thanks
They have this crazy invention called an antenna tube (look on page 33 of your FS2 manual to see what I am talking about). I know weird huh? These "tubes" were used to hold the antenna up right back before we had 2.4 GHz radios. Back in the day we also had brushed motors, although we just called them motors, on account of nobody ever heard of a motor without brushes. All of the batteries would have been know as 6s by todays standards, but because the cells were lower voltage, an old 6s pack is almost the same voltage as a 2s pack of today. CRAZY

Originally Posted by EastCoasterVa View Post
I loosely wind my antenna in the radio box. Make sure not to kink it anywhere.
That sounds like too much of a chance for glitching to me. You must be pretty new at this. If you did that back before 2.4 GHz, your car would have been uncontrolable and would have had terrible range.
h8thatadmin is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2012, 10:06 PM
  #4  
Tech Master
 
rcduder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Tacoma, WA
Posts: 1,124
Default

Originally Posted by Stanford55 View Post
Where do you place the long antennae found on higher-end receivers? I've got an Kyosho fs2 and a Mugen Eco converted to a sc truck, and wanted to upgrade my radio system.

I'm almost embarrassed by the newb question, but I only have experience with Spektrum 300 receivers (with very short antenna) and didn't know if the longer antennas have to actually be exposed outside of the vehicle, and if so, how did folks configure the antenna in the vehicles listed above?

Thanks
after i saw this: (look at the receiver wire on this sc10)

http://www.google.com/imgres?um=1&hl...0&tx=111&ty=14

this is what i do now but make it so there is no antenna tube needed, no glitching or anything works just like it should
rcduder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 05:05 AM
  #5  
Tech Fanatic
Thread Starter
iTrader: (35)
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Honolulu, HI
Posts: 826
Trader Rating: 35 (100%+)
Default

[QUOTE=h8thatadmin;10433182]They have this crazy invention called an antenna tube (look on page 33 of your FS2 manual to see what I am talking about). I know weird huh? These "tubes" were used to hold the antenna up right back before we had 2.4 GHz radios. Back in the day we also had brushed motors, although we just called them motors, on account of nobody ever heard of a motor without brushes. All of the batteries would have been know as 6s by todays standards, but because the cells were lower voltage, an old 6s pack is almost the same voltage as a 2s pack of today. CRAZY

smart ass...I know what an antenna tube is, I just didn't want to use one and didn't know how sensitive the coaxial wire is to bending/kinking, etc. (hence the question, how to wire properly w/out interference).

Originally Posted by rcduder View Post
after i saw this: (look at the receiver wire on this sc10)

http://www.google.com/imgres?um=1&hl...0&tx=111&ty=14

this is what i do now but make it so there is no antenna tube needed, no glitching or anything works just like it should
Thank you
Stanford55 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 05:15 AM
  #6  
Tech Elite
iTrader: (27)
 
rcgod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Tracy, CA
Posts: 3,156
Trader Rating: 27 (100%+)
Default

Miost current radios don't require a tube. Only radio I had that needed one was first generation spektrum. I just wrap it up with a zip tie and put it in the radio box. Even my son's cheap radio (flysky) works fine like that.
rcgod is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 03:01 PM
  #7  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 168
Default

Originally Posted by Stanford55 View Post
smart ass...I know what an antenna tube is, I just didn't want to use one and didn't know how sensitive the coaxial wire is to bending/kinking, etc. (hence the question, how to wire properly w/out interference).



Thank you
Oh, so you don't want you use the part whose sole purpose is to accompish the thing you are asking? You never said you didn't want to use an antenna tube, you just asked how to configure the antenna. If you don't want a hole in you body, and an antenna sticking out of it you could do what I do, and heat up the antenna tube with a heat gun and make a 90 degree bend right above where the tube comes out of the mount. That way your antenna is at least a little bit off of the chassis. Or, an even better idea is to wrap it around your transponder (signal transmitting device), then a couple passes through your motor wire (tons of EMI), then finally out a hole in the bottom of the chassis. Things are the way they are for a reason. Really smart people known as engineers (i'll be one as soon as i'm done with school) design them that way because there are often underlying forces at work, which are too in depth for the average person to understand. Antennas are signal receiving devices. The cleaner signal they have, the better they can do their job. Standing vertically helps get the antenna into "clean" air. Putting the antenna into a small plastic straw is the best way to accomplish this. Coiling it up inside a box with a bunch of other wires is not. While it will work, I expect very precise control over my cars, so I don't want to increase the odds of the antenna receiving some sort of interference which the receiver construes as a command.
h8thatadmin is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 03:26 PM
  #8  
Tech Fanatic
Thread Starter
iTrader: (35)
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Honolulu, HI
Posts: 826
Trader Rating: 35 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by h8thatadmin View Post
Oh, so you don't want you use the part whose sole purpose is to accompish the thing you are asking? You never said you didn't want to use an antenna tube, you just asked how to configure the antenna. If you don't want a hole in you body, and an antenna sticking out of it you could do what I do, and heat up the antenna tube with a heat gun and make a 90 degree bend right above where the tube comes out of the mount. That way your antenna is at least a little bit off of the chassis. Or, an even better idea is to wrap it around your transponder (signal transmitting device), then a couple passes through your motor wire (tons of EMI), then finally out a hole in the bottom of the chassis. Things are the way they are for a reason. Really smart people known as engineers (i'll be one as soon as i'm done with school) design them that way because there are often underlying forces at work, which are too in depth for the average person to understand. Antennas are signal receiving devices. The cleaner signal they have, the better they can do their job. Standing vertically helps get the antenna into "clean" air. Putting the antenna into a small plastic straw is the best way to accomplish this. Coiling it up inside a box with a bunch of other wires is not. While it will work, I expect very precise control over my cars, so I don't want to increase the odds of the antenna receiving some sort of interference which the receiver construes as a command.
Thanks for the reply...you're right, I never said anything about not wanting to use the tube, but as fewer people use it, I figured it was implied. Things are designed for a reason, even if in this case it looks just a little toy-ish...I'll probably go that route if it minimizes glitches/interference.
Stanford55 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 07:01 PM
  #9  
Tech Rookie
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 5
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

If you actually look at the pictures from the link above, you can see that they still used an antenna tube. They just coiled up a lot of the excess wire.
dragoontwo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2012, 09:49 PM
  #10  
Tech Elite
iTrader: (71)
 
klaymon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Columbus, OH
Posts: 2,330
Trader Rating: 71 (100%+)
Default

I put a piece of 3M Dual Lock inside the car (on the chassis, on top of the radio box, etc) and weave the antenna through it using rounded bends at each transition. I've been doing this basically since I started and have never had an issue. It's a clean look (no tube) and the antenna is protected.
klaymon is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2012, 06:38 PM
  #11  
Tech Master
 
rcduder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Tacoma, WA
Posts: 1,124
Default

Originally Posted by dragoontwo View Post
If you actually look at the pictures from the link above, you can see that they still used an antenna tube. They just coiled up a lot of the excess wire.
thats why i said coil it enough so an antenna tube is not needed
rcduder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2012, 07:33 PM
  #12  
Suspended
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 168
Default

Originally Posted by dragoontwo View Post
If you actually look at the pictures from the link above, you can see that they still used an antenna tube. They just coiled up a lot of the excess wire.
Allow me to explain what is really going on in that picture for all of you. AE has their own line of electronics (XP, which are mostly used in their line of RTR vehicles) as well as ties to LRP. In that picture they have equipted the truck with an XP servo (from what I have heard some of the XP servos are really nice), an LRP sensored speed control and motor (a racer based kit would not run an XP sensorless system), and one of their own XP receivers. Like I stated before, the XP stuff is more of a RTR line of electronics, and who between racers and bashers are more likely to try to drive their cars further away? Thats right, bashers. What is a good way to preserve signal integrity at a long range? A huge antenna on the receiver. Now we have to ask. What looks better for promotional pictures of a new vehicle, a little neat antenna tube that sits inside the body, or a massive CB whip? Clearly the answer is a neat litte short antenna under the body. Back in the days of 75mhz Losi would put a little tiny antenna tube, and cut the receiver wire so everything was nice and neat for their promotional pictures. Obviously the guy that built that SC10 for AE didn't want to, or was told not to do that, so the only option was to coil the antenna up at the base of the antenna mount. Does it really matter if your antenna is coiled up inside your receiver box or on the chassis? Maybe not, but like I said before, I do everything in my power to make sure my car is going to work its absolute best.
h8thatadmin is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2012, 09:37 PM
  #13  
Tech Master
iTrader: (21)
 
So*Cal AFDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Moreno Valley
Posts: 1,454
Trader Rating: 21 (100%+)
Default

Wrap it up and put like an inch in the antenna tube. It works. Don't have to worry about glitching now days. If it does glitch, raise it up. It's neater, and does not get in the way or damaged hanging outside the body.


So*Cal AFDude is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2012, 09:56 PM
  #14  
Tech Regular
iTrader: (7)
 
sneako's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: PA
Posts: 497
Trader Rating: 7 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by h8thatadmin View Post
They have this crazy invention called an antenna tube (look on page 33 of your FS2 manual to see what I am talking about). I know weird huh? These "tubes" were used to hold the antenna up right back before we had 2.4 GHz radios. Back in the day we also had brushed motors, although we just called them motors, on account of nobody ever heard of a motor without brushes. All of the batteries would have been know as 6s by todays standards, but because the cells were lower voltage, an old 6s pack is almost the same voltage as a 2s pack of today. CRAZY



That sounds like too much of a chance for glitching to me. You must be pretty new at this. If you did that back before 2.4 GHz, your car would have been uncontrolable and would have had terrible range.
Originally Posted by h8thatadmin View Post
Oh, so you don't want you use the part whose sole purpose is to accompish the thing you are asking? You never said you didn't want to use an antenna tube, you just asked how to configure the antenna. If you don't want a hole in you body, and an antenna sticking out of it you could do what I do, and heat up the antenna tube with a heat gun and make a 90 degree bend right above where the tube comes out of the mount. That way your antenna is at least a little bit off of the chassis. Or, an even better idea is to wrap it around your transponder (signal transmitting device), then a couple passes through your motor wire (tons of EMI), then finally out a hole in the bottom of the chassis. Things are the way they are for a reason. Really smart people known as engineers (i'll be one as soon as i'm done with school) design them that way because there are often underlying forces at work, which are too in depth for the average person to understand. Antennas are signal receiving devices. The cleaner signal they have, the better they can do their job. Standing vertically helps get the antenna into "clean" air. Putting the antenna into a small plastic straw is the best way to accomplish this. Coiling it up inside a box with a bunch of other wires is not. While it will work, I expect very precise control over my cars, so I don't want to increase the odds of the antenna receiving some sort of interference which the receiver construes as a command.
Originally Posted by h8thatadmin View Post
Allow me to explain what is really going on in that picture for all of you. AE has their own line of electronics (XP, which are mostly used in their line of RTR vehicles) as well as ties to LRP. In that picture they have equipted the truck with an XP servo (from what I have heard some of the XP servos are really nice), an LRP sensored speed control and motor (a racer based kit would not run an XP sensorless system), and one of their own XP receivers. Like I stated before, the XP stuff is more of a RTR line of electronics, and who between racers and bashers are more likely to try to drive their cars further away? Thats right, bashers. What is a good way to preserve signal integrity at a long range? A huge antenna on the receiver. Now we have to ask. What looks better for promotional pictures of a new vehicle, a little neat antenna tube that sits inside the body, or a massive CB whip? Clearly the answer is a neat litte short antenna under the body. Back in the days of 75mhz Losi would put a little tiny antenna tube, and cut the receiver wire so everything was nice and neat for their promotional pictures. Obviously the guy that built that SC10 for AE didn't want to, or was told not to do that, so the only option was to coil the antenna up at the base of the antenna mount. Does it really matter if your antenna is coiled up inside your receiver box or on the chassis? Maybe not, but like I said before, I do everything in my power to make sure my car is going to work its absolute best.
Unreal.
sneako is offline  
Reply With Quote

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service