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RC10B4/T4 Forum

Old 05-07-2009, 05:33 PM
  #7591  
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Originally Posted by Wild Cherry View Post
Make sure the slipper is adjusted correctly, if it is locked up your diff will fry early...
Only if you dont have the diff adjusted/built right. I run my slipper tight most of the time, and my diff is still ok.
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Old 05-07-2009, 05:48 PM
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does anyone know the part numbers for the short black ball studs everyone uses on the steering rack?
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Old 05-07-2009, 07:22 PM
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Originally Posted by THE RALLYKING View Post
What is best weight front/rear %?
An important question! It depends on what surface you are running, track layout, motor power, tyre choice etc etc.

The B4 typically runs between about 32%/68% (battery all the way back, lead in the back, super short wheelbase) and about 34%/66% (battery all the way front, no lead, long wheelbase). 2% doesnt sound like much of a change, but each wheelbase position only makes a change of 0.1% and you can feel it!

Typically, more weight to the rear will give:
- more on power forward traction
- less on power steering
- more rotation off power
- more wheelstands
this is most suitable on slippery tracks with a tight layout requiring a 'point and shoot' style

More weight to the front:
- more on power steering
- less rotation off power mid corner
- less forward traction
- less wheelstands
this is most suitable on high grip tracks with a flowing layout (where you need to blend your throttle and steering).

I find that this is the single most important chassis setup on the B4 (behind tyres of course).

I think the X6 runs closer to 38/62, which is waaay different to the B4 and hence why it handles so differently.

Ray

Last edited by ray_munday; 05-08-2009 at 06:55 AM. Reason: bad maths
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Old 05-07-2009, 07:51 PM
  #7594  
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Originally Posted by micrors4guy View Post
does anyone know the part numbers for the short black ball studs everyone uses on the steering rack?
I believe its #3981
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Old 05-07-2009, 07:59 PM
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Originally Posted by flame56mx View Post
I believe its #3981
I think that is correct. Are people using these to limit the moment arm? Seems like it would reduce to tendency to rotate the steering rack . . .
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Old 05-07-2009, 08:07 PM
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Originally Posted by ray_munday View Post
An important question! It depends on what surface you are running, track layout, motor power, tyre choice etc etc.

The B4 typically runs between about 32%/68% (battery all the way back, lead in the back, super short wheelbase) and about 34%/64% (battery all the way front, no lead, long wheelbase). 2% doesnt sound like much of a change, but each wheelbase position only makes a change of 0.1% and you can feel it!

Typically, more weight to the rear will give:
- more on power forward traction
- less on power steering
- more rotation off power
- more wheelstands
this is most suitable on slippery tracks with a tight layout requiring a 'point and shoot' style

More weight to the front:
- more on power steering
- less rotation off power mid corner
- less forward traction
- less wheelstands
this is most suitable on high grip tracks with a flowing layout (where you need to blend your throttle and steering).

I find that this is the single most important chassis setup on the B4 (behind tyres of course).

I think the X6 runs closer to 38/62, which is waaay different to the B4 and hence why it handles so differently.

Ray
Very well put. +1

DK
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Old 05-07-2009, 08:41 PM
  #7597  
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Does the latest #9035 FT RC10B4 kit come with the carbon or composite chassis?

EDIT ----> Answer = plastic chassis

Last edited by ShaunMac; 05-07-2009 at 08:57 PM. Reason: Found answer
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Old 05-07-2009, 10:43 PM
  #7598  
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Is anyone running the SC10 gear diff? Does it work well on the track?
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Old 05-08-2009, 04:48 AM
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Originally Posted by BIG RE View Post
Is anyone running the SC10 gear diff? Does it work well on the track?
I want to try it also.
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Old 05-08-2009, 06:40 AM
  #7600  
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Typically, more weight to the rear will give:
- more on power forward traction
- less on power steering
- more rotation off power
- more wheelstands
this is most suitable on slippery tracks with a tight layout requiring a 'point and shoot' style
Thanks for the awesome answer

And what is the ideal weight?
Some say you should try more toe in at the rear for low traction, what diffrence will it make?
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Old 05-08-2009, 07:03 AM
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Originally Posted by THE RALLYKING View Post
Thanks for the awesome answer

And what is the ideal weight?
Some say you should try more toe in at the rear for low traction, what diffrence will it make?
No problems. If only it was this clear in the manual life would be easy!

Basic tyre theory says that less weight gives you the best traction, but a heavy sprung mass (the chassis) gives the best performance through bumps. The change from nimh (heavy) to lipo has meant that everyone has had to re-work their setups to get a good balance of handling and bump traction.

If your track is relatively smooth, run at minimum weight with Lipos if possible. The car feels much more responsive and grips better (tyre wear is better too). You will need to run a softer setup (see the latest Thielke setups on rc0.com - these are a good starting point).

Increased toe-in will make the car accelerate straighter, and the rear slide a little less in corners, but it can 'snap' a little more at the limit (basically, you are taking the tyre to the limit a little quicker). Usually, tyres need a little more slip angle with less weight, hence why the lightweight lipo setups have been using them. I have found if the track is a slippery, point and shoot track it helps; if the track is grippy and flowing, stick with the standard 3 deg.

ray
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Old 05-08-2009, 09:15 AM
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Originally Posted by ray_munday View Post
No problems. If only it was this clear in the manual life would be easy!

Basic tyre theory says that less weight gives you the best traction, but a heavy sprung mass (the chassis) gives the best performance through bumps. The change from nimh (heavy) to lipo has meant that everyone has had to re-work their setups to get a good balance of handling and bump traction.

If your track is relatively smooth, run at minimum weight with Lipos if possible. The car feels much more responsive and grips better (tyre wear is better too). You will need to run a softer setup (see the latest Thielke setups on rc0.com - these are a good starting point).

Increased toe-in will make the car accelerate straighter, and the rear slide a little less in corners, but it can 'snap' a little more at the limit (basically, you are taking the tyre to the limit a little quicker). Usually, tyres need a little more slip angle with less weight, hence why the lightweight lipo setups have been using them. I have found if the track is a slippery, point and shoot track it helps; if the track is grippy and flowing, stick with the standard 3 deg.

ray
i enjoyed the read thank you..
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Old 05-08-2009, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by dangerwr View Post
I think that is correct. Are people using these to limit the moment arm? Seems like it would reduce to tendency to rotate the steering rack . . .
The short ball studs are for bump steer. The team used to put a washer under the stud out on the steering knuckle but you get the same effect using the short neck ball stud on the steering rack.
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Old 05-08-2009, 12:15 PM
  #7604  
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Speaking of the lightweight setup, am I right in thinking that when 2 coils are cut from the black rear springs that puts the spring between a green and a black? In theory, the shorter spring should be a little stiffer right? Also, where is the spring supposed to be cut? Is the bottom coil that is in contact with the spring cup counted as one coil or left out of the equation? Thanks in advance!!!
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Old 05-08-2009, 05:07 PM
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Originally Posted by adam lancia View Post
Speaking of the lightweight setup, am I right in thinking that when 2 coils are cut from the black rear springs that puts the spring between a green and a black? In theory, the shorter spring should be a little stiffer right?
yes thats correct

Originally Posted by adam lancia View Post
Also, where is the spring supposed to be cut? Is the bottom coil that is in contact with the spring cup counted as one coil or left out of the equation? Thanks in advance!!!
The coil in contact with the spring cup is counted as one coil. When you do the mod, get some pliers and bend the final coil like the original so that it sits flat on the spring cup (stops it popping off and helps it sit better). You may find you need the extended spring cups at the bottom (B44 front) to get enough ride height adjustment with this spring.

Alternatively, if you want the back a little stiffer than black, but softer than green, run the standard inside hole on the tower(not the 4th hole).

Ray
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