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Old 10-11-2004, 07:50 AM   #1
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Default some general questions about 2wd electric

so ive decided to spoil myself one last time before i have to start christmas shopping hehe

im getting myself an electric stadium truck, but i know absolutely nothing about running electric trucks. so im hoping some battery jokeys out there are willing to spread some wisdom

1) i dont plan on any high level competition for a while, so paying through the nose for nimh matched cells seems a little nuts. what level of battery pack should i be aiming for? where is the line between good enough for me, and pro level?

2) whats a good motor size to start with, and i guess in the same breath, what class do i want to prepare for? obviously stock is a bit slower and easier to learn with, than mod. im thinking going stock would also give me better run times and less maintinence. OTOH i dont want somthing agonizingly slow, i do after all run the BMX track alot

3) but certainly not least, speed control. to someone who doesnt know a matched cell from a hole in the wall, what would be the tangible benefits of spending 150 bucks on a speed control versus 50 on a regular one?
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Old 10-11-2004, 09:48 AM   #2
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Glad to see a nitro guy giving electric a try, we need more electric guys in most places these days .

NiMh 3000s are a good starting point for newbies, fairly cheap & still can pack a punch. If you can afford some, try to get a couple of 3300s though, some companies have them for cheaper prices than normal. They don't have to be matched or anything though.

A stock motor is by far the best starting point for you. You can probably handle a mild modified motor coming from the nitro scene, but gearing is kind of confusing at first. So try & prepare for stock first, then move up to mod or 19t racing. Stock really doesn't give you much better runtime, that's more based on the batteries you are running. But yes, stock racing has less maintenance than modified. Don't worry, stock isn't too slow compared to mod.

ESCs. Between getting a $50 & $150 ESC, go w\ the $150. The cheaper $50 ESCs are made for bashing, & don't really offer many features that are needed for racing. I think the LRP, Novak, etc. ESCs are simpler to get running, simply because they have the racing features, which save a big headche.

Hope this helps.
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Old 10-11-2004, 10:02 AM   #3
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actually wit more features it can be more of a headache for a beginner
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Old 10-11-2004, 10:09 AM   #4
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I agree with mike, but Id go with some cheap matched 3300s instead of those 3000 stick packs. You can get matched 1.150-9 cells for around $30 from most matchers. They dont cost too much more than those 3000 stick packs and will outlast them and probably perform better. I'd also go with atleast a 19T. You said that you will be bashing, and while a stock or a 19T is fast on an RC track, in reality it is pretty slow and you will probably notice it running it on a big BMX track. I dont think you have a comm lathe, so Id get one of the orion v2s. Get the highest turn you can find, I think 16x2 is the highest they make. The 16T may be a little fast for you at first, but because it is a v2 you should be able to get at least 30 runs out of it before a cut and replacing brushes, you could probably push it farther because you are bashing.
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Old 10-11-2004, 11:11 AM   #5
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You're right on to start with a truck -- they're the easiest electric to drive.

I agree with AE on the batteries. Low end matched 3300s will do you perfectly. Best to get more low-end packs than fewer high-end packs. Three packs is the minimum to bring to the track, four is better. But you don't need to go overboard and get 5 or 6.

I agree with Mike on the motor. Though I've been in the hobby for 8 years, I only started driving myself recently. As a driver, I'm a novice. Stock is plenty fast enough. Run relatively weak springs on a rebuildable stock motor and cool it down with a fan between runs; you should get an entire day at the track between comm cuts.

Get the best of both worlds: Orion is making available end bells to fit other motors, so you can turn any stocker into a V-2. Also, I think they're coming out with V-2 stocks, but I don't think they're commonly available yet. A V-2 stock should easily get 30 runs/cut.
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Old 10-11-2004, 12:11 PM   #6
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You may want to wait on the motor..O'Donnell/Check Point and Trinity are among the companies releasing new motor designs to compete with Orion's V2 technology.
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Old 10-11-2004, 01:50 PM   #7
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well, truth be told, im going to wait until i can go out buy a kit truck, a good charger, motor, and batteries all in one shot, so it will be at least a month or two before i can afford to take the electric plunge competley.

im not the least bit afraid of soldering, ive been doing it since i was 10, so just cheap matched (or unmatched, at this point i wouldnt be able to tell the difference lol) cells are fine. i can solder them myself. i may even not use plugs at all, if the ambition comes to me

honestly the only reason i went with nitro in the first place is because the thought of comm cutting seems a bit daunting. im pretty sure my LHS will do it, until i can afford a machine to do it for me. but either way, the less comm cutting the better!

i was going to get a P2K2 because of all the good ive been hearing about them, but im going to take aarons advice and sit on it for a while before i jump to any conclusions. if the V-2 is so great and low maintinance, the competitors comming out should be right up my ally

thanks for the input all!
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Old 10-11-2004, 03:02 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally posted by craziracer
actually wit more features it can be more of a headache for a beginner
Those escs still only offer about 5 or 6 features, the bashing ones don't feature that many. That's why I say he should go w\ the racing made ones. So he can set it up for stock or mod. or drag brake or whatever he wants.
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Old 10-11-2004, 03:04 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally posted by AE Racer
I agree with mike, but Id go with some cheap matched 3300s instead of those 3000 stick packs.
I never said get the stick-packs, those are definately basher type stuff. There are some companies that still sell matched 3000s I believe.
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Old 10-11-2004, 03:13 PM   #10
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Racing ESC or not, nearly all of the top brand speed controls are one-touch setup and very simple to get moving.

The biggest differences between a racing level unit and a basher are the smoothness of throttle and brake application, and the absence of reverse in a racing-level ESC.
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Old 10-11-2004, 05:55 PM   #11
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I race nitro stadium trucks but recently got a B4 to play around with also. What is it that makes the V2 motor the motor to have. Sounds like to me it's a long lasting motor is why it's so good. Also what is a good way to figure what gearing you should start with? Probably ask some of the guys at the track right? I guess before running it, I'll have to read the manual. My main question though is do you have to bother discharging your nimh batts at all? Or is it just run em, cool down, and charge em?
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Old 10-11-2004, 06:11 PM   #12
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its my understanding jbrow, and im probably wrong...

nimh batteries dont have memory issues like nicds, which is why nicds have to be discharged. if you leave a nicd with voltage in it and then just charge it, you lose a bit of capacity each time you do it.

nimh do not have those issues, and its actually recommended to store them when not in use with some charge left in them. i would imagine that discharging them down (its tricky, if i read the RCCA article right a couple months ago) to a low voltage and then charging them back up will give you optimal discharge voltage when you run them in your car. with nimh the charge rate greatly affects the output of the charge into your motor.

but again, i could be wrong.
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Old 10-11-2004, 06:45 PM   #13
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I knew they didn't develop a memory, just wondered if people bothered discharging anyhow, or if it just wore the battery out sooner. Thanx.
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Old 10-11-2004, 07:51 PM   #14
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Orion have a new machine wound version of the V2 coming out called the SV2, this motor is cheaper than the hand wound version but will still offer the low maintenence that you're after, I'd reccomend the Novak Dually esc, its simple to use, only $90 and has no motor limit.

The round brushes in the V2 and the angle they are set at reduces arcing, this equals less comm wear
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Old 10-11-2004, 07:52 PM   #15
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ok so lets say this magical V2 gets 30 runs per cut of the comm.

what constitutes a "run"? 5 minutes on the track? 15?
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