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Losi 1/10 TEN-SCTE ARR 4x4 Short Course Truck Thread

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Losi 1/10 TEN-SCTE ARR 4x4 Short Course Truck Thread

Old 05-27-2014, 04:16 PM
  #46186  
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Default New Owner Mods

The first mod was these Super Schpitzen Dirt Geblocken underbody panels. I formed them out of 0.035” Kydex PVC sheet using Mama’s oven and a crude set of wood dies, then screwed them onto the plastic side rails of the chassis using short #4 phillips self-tapping screws.

The next mod was to add a bearing to the front center diff mount to take the angular loads from the front driveshaft.

The third mod was to add bearings to the front diff outdrive cups. This took a little head scratching but after some work I was able to machine down the cups to fit a 10mm ID bearing and turn some bearing retainers out of Delrin on my lathe.

The fourth mod put outdrive cup bearings on the rear outdrives/diff.

The last mod was to swap the front and rear driveshafts to improve the angle to the front diff. I think this is what TLR did for the 2.0 (among other things), ostensibly to move the CG back. It involved drilling 5 new holes in the chassis plate and heating up and bending the front chassis brace to give the new front driveshaft some room.

So far, after about 1 weeks running (10-15 packs) things are staying tight and appear to be holding up.

Simon
Attached Thumbnails Losi 1/10 TEN-SCTE ARR 4x4 Short Course Truck Thread-scte_02.jpg   Losi 1/10 TEN-SCTE ARR 4x4 Short Course Truck Thread-scte_03.jpg   Losi 1/10 TEN-SCTE ARR 4x4 Short Course Truck Thread-scte_04.jpg   Losi 1/10 TEN-SCTE ARR 4x4 Short Course Truck Thread-scte_05.jpg   Losi 1/10 TEN-SCTE ARR 4x4 Short Course Truck Thread-scte_06.jpg  

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Old 05-28-2014, 06:03 AM
  #46187  
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Originally Posted by MrSvahn View Post
For some reason i keep breaking my bodyposts (one every bashing session). Now its gotten to the point where i am tired of replacing it and was wondering if u guys have any tips for an easy fix? Maybe body mounts from another model would fit or perhaps the proline extended mounts are more flexible and less prone to snap?

And yes, as u might have guessed i am bashing and sometimes land on the roof since i am still a EDITED-bad-EDITED driver. lol

Well, in that last line you posted why they are breaking You also run the post higher than you would with a short course body which is what they were designed for. The losi parts are tough. I have used the same body mounts for the life of several Losi trucks and never had a failure. I do have a suggestion. I have a older Ten T converted to electric. It has the body mounts that are very short on the shock tower so they don't ever break. That Ten T body looks more like a shrunken 1/8 scale truggy but I like it and the Ten t wing. You could swap to that body and the mounts to stop breakage. You might even be able to cut down that cool Chevy or GMC body to fit. Not cheap to swap bodies, but mounts are cheap and the Ten T body seems to last forever. With the Ten T body mounted low it flies better and is sealed to the chassis better keeping dirt out. I'm impressed with handling as well. With a good 550 motor is runs hard and turns lap times close to my Pro8 buggy. drives like a dream. Tires make a mean sound tearing around the track. I"m a racer and for me this is the ultimate racer's bash truck. That might not be what you wanted to hear, but I hope it helps in some way.
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Old 05-28-2014, 06:20 AM
  #46188  
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Originally Posted by AtomicPunk View Post
The first mod was these Super Schpitzen Dirt Geblocken underbody panels. I formed them out of 0.035” Kydex PVC sheet using Mama’s oven and a crude set of wood dies, then screwed them onto the plastic side rails of the chassis using short #4 phillips self-tapping screws.

The next mod was to add a bearing to the front center diff mount to take the angular loads from the front driveshaft.

The third mod was to add bearings to the front diff outdrive cups. This took a little head scratching but after some work I was able to machine down the cups to fit a 10mm ID bearing and turn some bearing retainers out of Delrin on my lathe.

The fourth mod put outdrive cup bearings on the rear outdrives/diff.

The last mod was to swap the front and rear driveshafts to improve the angle to the front diff. I think this is what TLR did for the 2.0 (among other things), ostensibly to move the CG back. It involved drilling 5 new holes in the chassis plate and heating up and bending the front chassis brace to give the new front driveshaft some room.

So far, after about 1 weeks running (10-15 packs) things are staying tight and appear to be holding up.

Simon
Wow! I'm a fan of your efforts. I like to see new ways of thinking about mods like this. Never know, your ideas might spark better designs from the factory on future builds. I think all the extra bearings could easily be added in the molds for the diffs right from the start. Extra wt is not good but having it in the right place for durability is a good tradeoff at times. You have that dirt that wears stuff out so the side dams do help. You could convert that puppy to a Pro8 and run a tight fitting body that eliminates most dirt from getting inside. Like the fresh ideas. Look forward to any others you want to share.
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Old 05-28-2014, 07:25 AM
  #46189  
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Originally Posted by Thunder Trail View Post
Wow! I'm a fan of your efforts. I like to see new ways of thinking about mods like this. Never know, your ideas might spark better designs from the factory on future builds. I think all the extra bearings could easily be added in the molds for the diffs right from the start. Extra wt is not good but having it in the right place for durability is a good tradeoff at times. You have that dirt that wears stuff out so the side dams do help. You could convert that puppy to a Pro8 and run a tight fitting body that eliminates most dirt from getting inside. Like the fresh ideas. Look forward to any others you want to share.
Thanks Thunder! I agree, the factory could change the front and rear gearbox cases to incorporate the added bearings, but I'm sure there are other trade-offs that they would have to make and the new injection molds would be spendy as well as the Non-Recoverable Engineering costs. That would be a business decision that only Team Losi could make.

I've been through 3 diff housings already before I made these mods so it may be that the additional parts sales are a good revenue stream for them.

The extra weight doesn't seem to bother the SCTE much, but I'm not an accomplished enough driver to really be aware of the difference. Besides, the SCTE 1.0 is no lightweight to begin with!

Thanks again,

Simon

Last edited by AtomicPunk; 05-28-2014 at 07:45 AM.
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Old 05-28-2014, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by AtomicPunk View Post
Thanks Thunder! I agree, the factory could change the front and rear gearbox cases to incorporate the added bearings, but I'm sure there are other trade-offs that they would have to make and the new injection molds would be spendy as well as the Non-Recoverable Engineering costs. That would be a business decision that only Team Losi could make.

I've been through 3 diff housings already before I made these mods so it may be that the additional parts sales are a good revenue stream for them.

The extra weight doesn't seem to bother the SCTE much, but I'm not an accomplished enough driver to really be aware of the difference. Besides, the SCTE 1.0 is no lightweight to begin with!

Thanks again,

Simon
3 diff cases? Did you know they made HD diff cases with the 2.0?

What is wearing out on them? Just leaking?

http://www.tlracing.com/Products/Def...odID=TLR332001
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Old 05-28-2014, 12:04 PM
  #46191  
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Originally Posted by Casper View Post
3 diff cases? Did you know they made HD diff cases with the 2.0?

What is wearing out on them? Just leaking?
Thanks Casper,

The last diff cases I ordered were the HD versions for the 2.0. What wears out is the steel insert that serves as the bearing/bushing for the outdrive cup shaft. (See Pic).

One wore out on the external bearing land due to a seized outer diff bearing, the other two wore out due to the bearing/bushing wearing to the point where the poor little silicone o-ring didn't stand a chance at keeping the diff fluid in the case. They developed about 2-3 degrees of angular slop.

The effective bushing length is around .275", not enough to keep the outdrive cup from starting to wallow around in there after 8-10 packs. With the exterior cup bearing modifications, I almost tripled the effective supported length for the cups. I'm hoping this will keep them running square and allow the little seal to keep doing it's job.

Thanks for asking,

Simon
Attached Thumbnails Losi 1/10 TEN-SCTE ARR 4x4 Short Course Truck Thread-scte_07.jpg  
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Old 05-28-2014, 12:23 PM
  #46192  
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Originally Posted by AtomicPunk View Post
Thanks Casper,

The last diff cases I ordered were the HD versions for the 2.0. What wears out is the steel insert that serves as the bearing/bushing for the outdrive cup shaft. (See Pic).

One wore out on the external bearing land due to a seized outer diff bearing, the other two wore out due to the bearing/bushing wearing to the point where the poor little silicone o-ring didn't stand a chance at keeping the diff fluid in the case. They developed about 2-3 degrees of angular slop.

The effective bushing length is around .275", not enough to keep the outdrive cup from starting to wallow around in there after 8-10 packs. With the exterior cup bearing modifications, I almost tripled the effective supported length for the cups. I'm hoping this will keep them running square and allow the little seal to keep doing it's job.

Thanks for asking,

Simon
I have yet to wear out a HD diff case. Do you add a little black grease to the oudrives before you build the diffs? The outdrives should not go in the diff inserts dry.

A bearing failure is a whole different problem. Looks like you run in a some pretty dirty environments though.
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Old 05-28-2014, 12:43 PM
  #46193  
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Originally Posted by Casper View Post
I have yet to wear out a HD diff case. Do you add a little black grease to the oudrives before you build the diffs? The outdrives should not go in the diff inserts dry.

A bearing failure is a whole different problem. Looks like you run in a some pretty dirty environments though.
Hi Casper,

The dirt is the problem and yes, I do lube the cup-to-bushing interface with some high temp Dow-Corning Molykote NLGI #2 bearing grease when assembling a new diff.

Thanks,

Simon
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Old 05-28-2014, 06:51 PM
  #46194  
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Default Four More Packs Today

Another four packs and no reliability problems. The rear cup from the center diff is loose (it's the only one that I can't fit an external bearing onto due to motor clearance) but the rest are rock solid.

Mark and I (Mark has a Traxxas Platinum) had many great competitive laps.

I can't believe how much fun this is!

Simon

Last edited by AtomicPunk; 05-28-2014 at 06:54 PM. Reason: Typo
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Old 05-28-2014, 07:00 PM
  #46195  
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Hey Casper,

What is the composition of the tracks that you regularly run on? Carpet, blue groove, clay, loamy? I'm impressed that you have never replaced a 2.0 HD diff case.

I think the sand gets the blame for my diff bushing problem. I can live with it.

Thanks,

Simon
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Old 05-28-2014, 08:51 PM
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Default SCTE Diff Wear

My experience with SCTE diffs started out bad on my first SCTE truck that was used and somewhat tired. I ran the truck until the diff drive cups were wore slap out and needed to be replaced. Over 100 lipos of torture and it all needed to be replaced. The HD diff cases or even the 1.0 cases last and last if you change the oil and grease often. I have some diffs with over 300 runs, but they are taken apart every 50 to 60 lipos for oil and diff washers. The silicone seals seem to last about 150 lipos with this frequent maintenance. However, these diffs eat diff washers/shims fast. The washers fill the diff oil with metal and increase wear. After about 80 to 90 lipos with no maintenance my diffs are all but done.

I'm experimenting with some different washers/shims and even Casper Extreme Grease all in an effort to reduce maintenance 50%. It would be great to go 100 runs between service intervals, but that might not be posible on these dirty tracks. I just started this test so it will be end of summer before I will have any info worthy to post. However I have a good feeling about the new washers that are about the same size as MIP diff washers but at a much lower price.

Indoor or clean tracks are easier on equipment. Outdoor tracks with sand and deep fluff on top are really hard on all moving parts. I spend a lot of time cleaning my rig after each run on sandy loose dirt that gets into everything. Might be borderline OCD but it eats up time between races.
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Old 05-28-2014, 09:02 PM
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I had my truck sitting for a year and over that period of time the diffs leaked pretty bad granted they were probably a little leaky before then. Also I use an air compressor to clean my truck after each run which seems to help on wear and tear.
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Old 05-29-2014, 05:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Thunder Trail View Post
Well, in that last line you posted why they are breaking You also run the post higher than you would with a short course body which is what they were designed for. The losi parts are tough. I have used the same body mounts for the life of several Losi trucks and never had a failure. I do have a suggestion. I have a older Ten T converted to electric. It has the body mounts that are very short on the shock tower so they don't ever break. That Ten T body looks more like a shrunken 1/8 scale truggy but I like it and the Ten t wing. You could swap to that body and the mounts to stop breakage. You might even be able to cut down that cool Chevy or GMC body to fit. Not cheap to swap bodies, but mounts are cheap and the Ten T body seems to last forever. With the Ten T body mounted low it flies better and is sealed to the chassis better keeping dirt out. I'm impressed with handling as well. With a good 550 motor is runs hard and turns lap times close to my Pro8 buggy. drives like a dream. Tires make a mean sound tearing around the track. I"m a racer and for me this is the ultimate racer's bash truck. That might not be what you wanted to hear, but I hope it helps in some way.
Yeah it might be higher than usual but i brake my rear post as well and that is pretty low. There is only one hole visible above the mount itself.

In the rear i snapped the post right off but in the front the post cracked in the little hole where the screw holding the plate which holds the body is.

I think the ten-t mount would be to low but i read somewhere that the slash 2wd body mount might work with a little modification so im gonna try that i break it again.
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Old 05-29-2014, 01:08 PM
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Originally Posted by MrSvahn View Post
In the rear i snapped the post right off but in the front the post cracked in the little hole where the screw holding the plate which holds the body is.
Make the body holes twice as long, that will absorb most chassis flex.
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Old 05-30-2014, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Thunder Trail View Post
My experience with SCTE diffs started out bad on my first SCTE truck that was used and somewhat tired. I ran the truck until the diff drive cups were wore slap out and needed to be replaced. Over 100 lipos of torture and it all needed to be replaced. The HD diff cases or even the 1.0 cases last and last if you change the oil and grease often. I have some diffs with over 300 runs, but they are taken apart every 50 to 60 lipos for oil and diff washers. The silicone seals seem to last about 150 lipos with this frequent maintenance. However, these diffs eat diff washers/shims fast. The washers fill the diff oil with metal and increase wear. After about 80 to 90 lipos with no maintenance my diffs are all but done.

I'm experimenting with some different washers/shims and even Casper Extreme Grease all in an effort to reduce maintenance 50%. It would be great to go 100 runs between service intervals, but that might not be posible on these dirty tracks. I just started this test so it will be end of summer before I will have any info worthy to post. However I have a good feeling about the new washers that are about the same size as MIP diff washers but at a much lower price.

Indoor or clean tracks are easier on equipment. Outdoor tracks with sand and deep fluff on top are really hard on all moving parts. I spend a lot of time cleaning my rig after each run on sandy loose dirt that gets into everything. Might be borderline OCD but it eats up time between races.
Wow Thunder, thanks for the tips! I'll add your maintenance intervals to my maintenance schedule.

Simon
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