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Old 12-28-2003, 02:50 PM   #1
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Default Shock air removal tool

Has anyone used a tool to "vacuum" air out of shocks? Who makes it?
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Old 12-28-2003, 04:48 PM   #2
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Hi,

I usee the Ride air removeable tool on all my shocks...it is somewhat small for offroad shocks though but it will still work.

Thanks
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Old 12-28-2003, 07:22 PM   #3
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I have one. It's great. Tamiya used to sell them. I think Ride still does.

Get one its well worth it.
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Old 01-02-2004, 10:08 AM   #4
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Don't get one if you have Associated shocks, those are supposed to have air in them to work right. AE's shocks are emulsion shocks.
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Old 01-03-2004, 09:01 PM   #5
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dont get one you will do as well without one.






not slow.....





ty x-ray racer
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Old 01-03-2004, 10:30 PM   #6
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As far as the standard Losi & Associated shocks go you do not need these vac tools. Follow the directions in the manuals when you build the shock and they will work correctly. The standard shocks we use must have some air in them to work. It is simple hydraulics. Oil does not compress. So if there is no air in the shock you will not be able to compress the shaft into the main body. You need a volume of air equal to the volume of the shock shaft that extends into the main shock body. If you take all the air out of our shocks they will not work without a remote reservoir, bladder or a other compressable media like an accumulator. You have to compensate for the oil that is displaced when the shock shaft enters the main body. When you push the shock shaft in and it will not bottom out it has to much oil in it. If you push the shaft in and it bottoms out then extends on its own more than 1/8 of an inch that means it still has to much oil in it. What happens is the air in the shock compresses near the end of the stroke. As it decompresses the shaft extends.
As we run and our shocks leak they get to much air in them then then the extra volume of air will compress rather than allowing the piston to move throught the oil. It will also allow the oil to foam and damping is lost. If you have ever ran an air over hydraulic operated device this will make sense to you. The Losi shock tool is a better investment than the vac tool. I have worked with it since it came out and I will not build a set of shocks without it.
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Old 01-04-2004, 07:06 AM   #7
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Sorry but I couldn't disagree more with you about the use of the tool.

What you says is correct about some air needed, BUT you get that by bleeding the losi/assoc shocks like the manual says.

99.9% of the time some bubbles are trapped in the oil, yes you could tap on the shock and wait hours for them to rise but some of the tiny ones will still stick to the body or threads inside the shock. You can use the tool to quickly pump these out. I have built and rebuilt hundreds of shocks and you would be amazed at how much air actually gets in there.

The proper amount of oil will be removed by bleeding the shock correctly. If you leave extra bubbles in the oil without getting them all out by use of the air removal tool then you will have too much air in the shock to begin with. So you are basically starting with a shock that has leaked and needs to be rebuilt or one that needs to be rebuilt much quicker.

It is simply impossible to remove to much air from the oil before the shock is assemble. You want 100% of the air out of the oil before assembly. That is the exact purpose of the tool. Then by following the directions you bleed the correct amount of oil for the shock to work properly. Since I have started using the tool all of my shocks are better.

I too use the Losi shock tool, its great.
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Old 01-04-2004, 10:54 AM   #8
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It is Ok to disagree, we all have opinions.
Since this was an off-road thread I was directing my statement towards Losi & Associated shocks.
Associated has no threads inside to trap bubbles and Losi are only filled to the threads so threads should not be an issue.
I feel proper filling with silicone oil in modern shock bodies that are coated will not produce enough air to be concerned with.
I can not see in a shock so it is hard for me to tell if there is air. Maybe your eyes are better than mine are but it just looks like a dark hole to me.
If you fill so that oil hits the inside of the shock body and runs to the bottom of the shock virtually no bubbles should form.
I have a hydraulics certification and deal with hydraulics every day so I base my opinion on what I know
The theory behind it is OK but I fail to see itís necessity the above conditions.
I have never used one so I can not say I can even compare it to anything.
But how many big racers use them? Kindwald, Francis, Baker, etc.
In 14 years of racing I have never saw one on a pit bench.
But hey, if it works for you that is cool.
If you think they are that good maybe I will buy one just to test and see.
Darrell
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Old 01-04-2004, 12:25 PM   #9
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your right, they look real dark inside. to be honest i didn't believe how much air was in there until i used it myself. sometimes its only a few bubbles, but sometimes its a lot. the threads inside i was referring to are the one that the shock cartridge screws into inside the body, if oil runs down those threads while filling it grabs air bubbles.

its worth doing in my opinion. the 20 bucks i spent to get the tool is worth it, especially since i use it on touring shocks as well as off-road.

plus, its actually kind of fun/cool to use.
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Old 01-06-2004, 12:30 PM   #10
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So are the Yokomo shock caps a bad thing? They have a bleeder screw at the top, I can get almost all the air out with these caps.
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Old 01-08-2004, 04:20 PM   #11
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Default Losi Shock Tool

What does the losi shock tool do???
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Old 01-08-2004, 05:06 PM   #12
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Default Re: Losi Shock Tool

Quote:
Originally posted by Rowdy Racer
What does the losi shock tool do???
it allows you to torque it down and close it up real tight. it's a good, inexpensive plastic tool.
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Old 01-08-2004, 05:15 PM   #13
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Default Re: Losi Shock Tool

Quote:
Originally posted by Rowdy Racer
What does the losi shock tool do???
I think he meant this.

http://www.teamlosi.com/newprod/2003prods/shocktool.htm
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Old 01-08-2004, 07:08 PM   #14
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http://www.rc-ride.co.jp/eng/docs/rp600.html
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Old 01-09-2004, 10:57 AM   #15
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Hey thanks, now I understand!!!
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