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Old 02-20-2009, 07:49 AM   #1
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Default droop versus internal shock limiting

Can someone explain the handling differences between limiting droop using droop screws versus using internal shock limiting when it comes to limiting the downward action of the a-arm? Do they basically do the same thing, or is there more to it?
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Old 02-20-2009, 08:03 AM   #2
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I only run 1/10 scale electric, so speaking for those there are no droop screws. To adjust droop on those vehicles internal shock limiters are the only way.
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Old 02-20-2009, 08:04 AM   #3
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Well, from a purely physical standpoint, they do the exact same thing.......limit the downward travel of the arms to a desired point. How and where they do it is a obviously different.
I'm kinda partial using sections of fuel line underneath the pistons. Others might not do this or even warn against doing so as (especially in Mini shocks) it will alter the handling characteristics of the shock oil you are using, thus altering the handling.....even if only a tad bit. Viscosity from the tubing can create air bubbles, not allow the oil to pass freely or even tear.

I prefer the Fuel Line method as I run mostly minis anyway, I don't want to have to worry about piston holes lining up and it's cheap. I do have a few cars with the droop limiters and am not a big fan of them. The new Vendetta TC has them built into the upper/inner arms which, in my opinion, weakens those parts substantialy. I also feel that the tubing almost gives ya a little cushion if the arms/shocks get sprung whereas the droop limiters will just slam into whatever plastic or alloy part to which they are juxtaposed.
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Old 02-20-2009, 08:14 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cain View Post
Can someone explain the handling differences between limiting droop using droop screws versus using internal shock limiting when it comes to limiting the downward action of the a-arm? Do they basically do the same thing, or is there more to it?
The two methods yield basically the same result. The reason I use the droop screws is because it takes stress off the shocks in the event of a crash. This helps in the type of crash where the wheel is pulled down forcefully. I also like the screws because they are easy to change, no shock rebuilding required. With offroad this isn't as important, but droop screws are a main adjustment for sedans. Because I raced sedans for several years I tend to remain stuck in my ways.

Droop screws do have one major disadvantage for offroad and that is getting dirt stuck under them. This cant really happen with internal limiters.
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Old 02-20-2009, 09:41 AM   #5
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thanks for the info. I want to try a few droop changing settings to see how it affects handling on the track, but would prefer to use something that doesn't require me to dissassemble the shock to see if it works or not. Thanks again.
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Old 02-20-2009, 10:16 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cain View Post
thanks for the info. I want to try a few droop changing settings to see how it affects handling on the track, but would prefer to use something that doesn't require me to dissassemble the shock to see if it works or not. Thanks again.
A smooth tight track (like indoor) works with less droop
which makes for less roll and more side traction = better steering
just an FYI
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