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Old 04-09-2008, 03:52 PM   #106
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The Hooters near my house is getting into car show season. I asked the GM there if I could slice off a small part of the lot for an RC demonstration. He said that is sounded cool. SO I have the green light. I just have to finish my custom RC10 gold pan street tuner project by then. I have a few weeks still so I should be good.

I am having a hard time getting into the town council meeting with my schedule, but as least I know the local cops support my idea which usually is a good thing.

I have also begun designing creative for the RC Revolution. Nothing intricate at the moment as I am just in planning phases and my time is limited as it is.

It seems I may get a few of my friends to finally see the light. I bought an E-Maxx and they all looked on like little kids in a toy store. We took turns bashing it and now they all want an RC vehicle of some sort. the E-maxx is a great way to entice people to the hobby. It comes assembled and its fast, durable, highly water resistant and fun for about the price of an Xbox elite with an extra controllers and 2 games. (that analogy include the necessary batteroes and charger). I talked another friend out of buying Magic: the Gathering cards (he was going to buy 4 booster boxes at about 90 a clip) and now he looks poised to buy and E-Maxx or Rustler VXL.

Keep spreading the word guys. Bring your RCs with you everywhere you go and let people try them out. Support your local hobby shops. This sport rocks!
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Old 04-10-2008, 10:48 AM   #107
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Getting back into this hobby has really made me happy and it pains me to see that in some respects that it is dwindling. I made this thread so we can brainstorm and come up with ways to do this. I have been thinking about this alot lately and I have a perspective on this that I think could really get this hobby into the mainstream.

First, a little about my background. I am a graphic artist and I specialize in branding and identity. I mainly freelance but I have just taken a job at as an art director for a branding firm. My exposure to this part of the creative industry taught me valuable lessons about marketing and business and what makes them succeed and fail. My experience tells me that what is holding this hobby back is the way the major players in the industry market themselves. The other factor is small hobby shops with limited budgets for advertising which in turn strangles the business. In short, both the local hobby shops and the manufacturers need to change their business models.

Here is a basic list of things that I believe will elevate this hobby to a mainstream level:

1. Advertising - trade and hobby magazines are nice but it doesn't really bring new people to the hobby (to be honest the 70% ad to content ratio in those magazines gets tiresome anyway. 50/50 is really all they need. I would rather see reviews on those products more than the adverts as well). National Newspapers and cable TV is where the hobby will pick up steam. Yeah it is expensive, but more on that later. Cable TV is awesome. Advertisments on channels like G4, Gameplay HD (new and advertising would be relatively cheap), Science channel, Discovery channel, Speed Channel (big one here) and TLC will definately hit many in the demographic that would be likely to delve into the RC hotness.

2. Aggressive marketing strategies beyond advertising. Call up the host of Pinks and get some marketing guys to put RC cars on the show on the speed channel where people race against one another for their rides. Call MTV and get few drivers on the true life series (This did wonders for WEC featherweight champ Urijah Faber and really opened the door for the WEC franchise). ESPN2 would entertain airing major RC events. MORE tradeshows too. Not just TOY shows but RC shows complete with indoor/outdoor tracks and events. I have lived in NJ all my life and never once saw anything like that.

3. The money - The major players in the industry need to consider consolidation. This will lower operating expenses and open up a larger revenue stream for advertising and promotion. Suck it up guys. In the immortal words of Marcellus Wallace (Ving Raimes - Pulp Fiction) - "If you feel a little sting" If you care about the hobby and want to be a gazllionaire then this is what needs to be done. While friendly rivalries are nice for the sport, but at the end of the day, its the bashers who make up the largest demographic and we do not care about having a favorite team. Its about having fun in our spare time. The magic that can be made if say Team Associated, Trinity and Novak merged. Issue an IPO, go public and the money will roll in and product will become cheaper and more reasonable to the average consumer.

4. Hobby shops - I have seen the websites for some local hobby shops. Sickening....some literally made me want to upchuck. Stop having your 12 year old kid throw up a sloppy looking site with no functionality. You are judged heavily on your website. Consider branding. In fact call me. I just may donate my services to help you get off on the right foot. Most hobby shops, like many small businees fail because they are too frugal with advertising and promotion and in the end they die out as a result. If you cannot muster up the capital to do it right, then don't do it. Sell your stuff on ebay and save the leasing and liability insurance. One thing I have told all my small business clients is that their opinion of how their business should be represented comes second to the customers opinion. Hire a graphic artist who knows how to set up a tone and feel for your business that will attract new business. Also consider partnering up competing shops to ease costs and keep a larger inventory or build a track. Strength in numbers.


Thats pretty much it. There are other ways I am sure but this plan WILL do it. Please post your ideas and lets revive this awesome, pure and challenging hobby and get it into the mainstream.
I'll have to strongly disagree that you think that the RC magazines don't bring new people into the hobby...how did you first find out about RC? Mine was through RCM, and RCCA.

I have worked at RCCA, and play a major part at XRC, and the amount of money we spend on putting the magazines on the newsstand, in front of new people is a lot. Realistically MAGAZINES are the only (we'll say internet now too) that bring new people into the hobby with advertising.

There are a few hobbyshops that do that too.


I'll edit my above statement to say the RC magazine spend the most, but many don't understand how it works.
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Old 04-10-2008, 11:00 AM   #108
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Tom,
I think a little history is in order. First of all the grandaddy of hobbies is model railroading. Before Joseph Kennedy was blown up in one of the first RC planes, Model Trains had already been around for almost a hundred years. You can say their heyday was in the 1950's but the products continue to have real relevance. While that demo may be aging, trains are still a very compelling hobby and may in fact have a much greater growth potential than RC racing. Slot car racing saw a mainstream boom in the 70's and in fact most of the pioneers in RC came from that medium. As with most toys/hobbies it went through a boom then bust and has been relegated to the back shelf for about thirty years. In recent years slots seem to be having a resurgence and from a growth perspective have a strong future. The best current analogue for these various segments would be paintball. Although far more active than any of the other segments noted it is still primarily a hobby and is currently at or near the apex to it's boom. The fact that paintball is occasionally on ESPN has more to do with the changes in television than in it's differentiation from the other activities. Like RC racing, Paintball is a very difficult activity to base a compelling television product on.

To put things in financial perspective, trains make up perhaps 30% - 35% of the overall domestic hobby market. In Germany those numbers go up dramatically. RC planes and helicopters also make up perhaps as much as 25% of the market. Slots are smaller but the point is this is a diversified industry of which RC racing is only a small part. When you say "they" need to drop trains and slots, who are you referring to?

The plight of the hobby shops is an interesting one and you are right that the future of all these segments lies in the hands of hobby retailers. Hobbytown USA is doing a good job in reinventing the bricks and mortar retail environment through their franchising scheme. I would suggest you find one and check it out. Traditional hobby shops have been commonly pretty bad merchandizers and at this point really only the best of the best have survived.

With the magazines I agree they all need much content help. I've subscribed to many over the years and bought at least a copy of every one I've ever seen and the successful ones have always been pretty worthless from a racers point of view. I think this goes back to my earlier point about their recognition that they must access a broader audience to improve their financial position. The big ones, RCCA, RC Driver, Extreme RC, realize that they are essentially catalogs for kids in Walmart, Barnes and Noble and Borders. What's more, since this is a product based hobby, the news cycle is closely tied to the product cycle, which is quite long. This leaves the magazines looking to basically fill the pages with something remotely interesting in between product releases. The best magazine for RC racing was hands down, Competition Plus. This was a magazine that relied on advertising from race oriented companies and subscriptions for revenue, but provided great race coverage and reasonably objective reviews. No surprise it didn't last as Trinity and Tower got a much bigger bang for their buck out of RCCA, but it was a far superior magazine if you were Hardcore Other interesting mags were ROAR's Rev-up, and Mike Myers' Starting Grid which is still online. http://www.sgrid.com/SGM/index.php

Enough for now.

I'm a racer, and Competition Plus was HORRIBLE. People liked it because it printed their name, nothing more. I think we "remember" a better magazine than it really was.

You talk a lot about getting RC mainstream but you talk of a magazine that catered to maybe a few hundred people the best? Sort of a contradiction.
As you stated BASHERS make up the hobby...they don't care about racing, nor would they care about a magazine just about racing.

We can debate what makes a good magazine for the industry and one that is good for a specific racer.
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Old 04-10-2008, 11:06 AM   #109
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I'll also add there is room, lots of room, for improvement with all magazines. Nothing is perfect, so it's easy to be an armchair prophet and tell how it should be at times.

Money isn't growing on trees, cheaper prices and less margin mean less money to try new things. I've seen a few companies forget about the core of the industry (you have to establish advertising to the people INTO RC before you go for the new ones) and leave the RC magazines, and really none of them had any success. The examples of the ones that established their brand in the industry and then went out to market to new people (the most expensive person to get) are HPI, Traxxas, maybe a little bit of Tamiya.
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Old 04-10-2008, 11:09 AM   #110
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DerekB, They may entice people to the sport but I do not think they reach as big an audience. Chances are, someone who picked up a copy did so after seeing or using someone else's RC vehicle and it peaked their interest. In that regard they do a good job of introducing an already interested party to the hobby. Hobby shops may well sell them, but again, this is only after someone has already generated interest. This is definitely good and it is NOT the magazines responsibility to attract new people as much as it is to keep the current enthusiasts hooked and to that end, they do their job well. Basically the magazines are step 2 to on the way to full blow enthusiast. We need to focus on step 1 - Generating Interest (this is where branding and promotions comes into play)

What we can do is find ways to generate a high level of interest. As enthusiasts, we can simply talk it up to people who have never experienced it. Take advantge of local hangouts and get-togethers and direct interested people to your local hobby shop. The hobby shops can ask their regulars for donations to help them fund small events in neighboring towns like a mini tradeshow or demonstration that includes racers from the surrounding areas to do some exhibition racing. The manufacturers can advertise on cable TV on popular channels for the RC demographic as well as put together their own RC based tradeshows where people can come and watch demonstrations, rent an RC to try out, buy or trade parts and kits, have seminars from pro racers giving people tips on getting started in racing.

So I agree and disagree with you. I agree that the magazines can push those who are interested in RC into the hobby full time. I disagree that they are bringing in people who have never been exposed to RC vehicles outside of cheap radio shack toys. The magazines are the perfect stepping stone, what we need to do as enthusiasts, hobby shop owners and manufacturers is to make the walkway to get to that first stepping stone.
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Old 04-10-2008, 11:09 AM   #111
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DerekB, They may entice people to the sport but I do not think they reach as big an audience. Chances are, someone who picked up a copy did so after seeing or using someone else's RC vehicle and it peaked their interest. In that regard they do a good job of introducing an already interested party to the hobby. Hobby shops may well sell them, but again, this is only after someone has already generated interest. This is definitely good and it is NOT the magazines responsibility to attract new people as much as it is to keep the current enthusiasts hooked and to that end, they do their job well. Basically the magazines are step 2 to on the way to full blow enthusiast. We need to focus on step 1 - Generating Interest (this is where branding and promotions comes into play)

What we can do is find ways to generate a high level of interest. As enthusiasts, we can simply talk it up to people who have never experienced it. Take advantge of local hangouts and get-togethers and direct interested people to your local hobby shop. The hobby shops can ask their regulars for donations to help them fund small events in neighboring towns like a mini tradeshow or demonstration that includes racers from the surrounding areas to do some exhibition racing. The manufacturers can advertise on cable TV on popular channels for the RC demographic as well as put together their own RC based tradeshows where people can come and watch demonstrations, rent an RC to try out, buy or trade parts and kits, have seminars from pro racers giving people tips on getting started in racing.

So I agree and disagree with you. I agree that the magazines can push those who are interested in RC into the hobby full time. I disagree that they are bringing in people who have never been exposed to RC vehicles outside of cheap radio shack toys. The magazines are the perfect stepping stone, what we need to do as enthusiasts, hobby shop owners and manufacturers is to make the walkway to get to that first stepping stone.
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Old 04-10-2008, 11:18 AM   #112
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DerekB, They may entice people to the sport but I do not think they reach as big an audience. Chances are, someone who picked up a copy did so after seeing or using someone else's RC vehicle and it peaked their interest. In that regard they do a good job of introducing an already interested party to the hobby. Hobby shops may well sell them, but again, this is only after someone has already generated interest. This is definitely good and it is NOT the magazines responsibility to attract new people as much as it is to keep the current enthusiasts hooked and to that end, they do their job well. Basically the magazines are step 2 to on the way to full blow enthusiast. We need to focus on step 1 - Generating Interest (this is where branding and promotions comes into play)

What we can do is find ways to generate a high level of interest. As enthusiasts, we can simply talk it up to people who have never experienced it. Take advantge of local hangouts and get-togethers and direct interested people to your local hobby shop. The hobby shops can ask their regulars for donations to help them fund small events in neighboring towns like a mini tradeshow or demonstration that includes racers from the surrounding areas to do some exhibition racing. The manufacturers can advertise on cable TV on popular channels for the RC demographic as well as put together their own RC based tradeshows where people can come and watch demonstrations, rent an RC to try out, buy or trade parts and kits, have seminars from pro racers giving people tips on getting started in racing.

So I agree and disagree with you. I agree that the magazines can push those who are interested in RC into the hobby full time. I disagree that they are bringing in people who have never been exposed to RC vehicles outside of cheap radio shack toys. The magazines are the perfect stepping stone, what we need to do as enthusiasts, hobby shop owners and manufacturers is to make the walkway to get to that first stepping stone.
Realistically the company that gets people into RC is TYCO or Radioshack as they advertise "RC" to the masses and create the interest.

I think many people underestimate just how mainstream RC really is. My story I tell all the time is that I went to go do a photoshoot at a local state park. I talk to the attendant (I didn't want to pay $15 for 20 minutes of shooting) and when I mentioned what we were doing, this retired lady of about 60+ said her husband had one of those......T-Maxxes.

When you talk to just about anybody on the street if you say RC car they really know what you mean, they don't always think about toys...even though we really are just playing with an expensive toy (it's not a negative term).

RC is probably too common for its own good. Back in the day (I don't know how old you are but I'm guessing if you read Competition Plus you're about as old or older than I at 33). RC was some crazy new thing. So people saw it and freaked out. Now a days it's really super cheap (you can get an RTR nitro 1/8-scale for $350, which is about what i paid for my Tamiya Falcon combo from tower and lots of people have them. So the "OMG factor is lessoned".

I still do think that showing people a car always attracts attention. When we go to supercross with Proline they bring their buggies and it attracts a crowd. But so does the moron on an electric scooter trying to take the same jump. I actually have written editorials on how planting the RC seed by driving it in places where people are will help.

But a lot of things I read seem to be a "dream list" of "if I had a billion and wanted to blow it in RC"
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Old 04-10-2008, 11:44 AM   #113
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Realistically the company that gets people into RC is TYCO or Radioshack as they advertise "RC" to the masses and create the interest.
Well yes and no. The vehicles I see are those wierd fying/gliding/floating things. Those also tend to be marketed to a younger crowd which is good and all but it is not reaching a guy, 25, wrenchhead, rides quads when he gets the chance. What would reach a guy like that would be a Traxxas Rustler VXL pushing 50 mph out of the box, that is upgradeable via hop-ups and custom machining. That guy just may go online and look for local shops and check it out.

Another good way to generate interest is to place ads in other magazines like Popular Mechanics, Dirtbike Magazine, Import Tuner Magazine, etc with ads specific to each demographic. Like in Import Tuner magazine, an ad for a 1/10th scale touring car with a hot body job and tricked out wheels that concentrates on speed, performance and bling. Dirtbike magazine could have a 2wd buggy flying high on a tabletop jump over a moto-racer standing next to his bike with verbiage concentrating on big air, handling and acceleration. You get the idea.

Its all in the marketing. We need to get people to those magazines so the goal would be to find the perfect vehicle to get them there.
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Old 04-10-2008, 11:54 AM   #114
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Well yes and no. The vehicles I see are those wierd fying/gliding/floating things. Those also tend to be marketed to a younger crowd which is good and all but it is not reaching a guy, 25, wrenchhead, rides quads when he gets the chance. What would reach a guy like that would be a Traxxas Rustler VXL pushing 50 mph out of the box, that is upgradeable via hop-ups and custom machining. That guy just may go online and look for local shops and check it out.

Another good way to generate interest is to place ads in other magazines like Popular Mechanics, Dirtbike Magazine, Import Tuner Magazine, etc with ads specific to each demographic. Like in Import Tuner magazine, an ad for a 1/10th scale touring car with a hot body job and tricked out wheels that concentrates on speed, performance and bling. Dirtbike magazine could have a 2wd buggy flying high on a tabletop jump over a moto-racer standing next to his bike with verbiage concentrating on big air, handling and acceleration. You get the idea.

Its all in the marketing. We need to get people to those magazines so the goal would be to find the perfect vehicle to get them there.
Traxxas has done a lot of that advertising in other magazines, but sometimes stuff like that doesn't work. when I read Car and Driver or Road and Track I really don't care to see ads about other subject matter, but that's me.

Magazine advertising isn't cheap, some magazines can be over $50,000 per page per month, that's a big investment on a stretch sale. YEs it can work, but large sums of money can be used IN the industry first. Very few companies have even advertised IN the RC industry, never mind have enough money to try and advertise elsewhere.

And say Traxxas spends all this money to get in Motortrend (which they do) part of their advertising is for RC, which means they don't get the full reward of that effort because somebody can be interested do some quick Googling and find something else...or pick up a magazine about RC entirely.

Advertising is expensive, but it does work very well...even when done wrong. It works better when done right.
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Old 04-10-2008, 01:49 PM   #115
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I like the thought processes I see on a variety of fronts.

DerekB- I appreciate all the work you have done in the MAG. I appreciate the insight into the hobby as well as personal experience. I know most people don't understand the "deadlines" and all the behind the scenes stuff that goes into producing a mag every month. Its not all about "playing with cars". There is a lot more than goes into it.


Realistically, its about exposure. being visible, attracting attention and getting outside interest drawn into the hobby. I know of a couple of LHSs that were located in or near malls. In the summer, a local RC organization used to run outdoor onraod races in a blocked off section of the parkinglot. TONS of people, many w/ kids would line up around the edge of the track to watch. they asked questions, would wander into the store, but it at least got their attention.

Other things to consider, for MOST of us, the $$ spent is explendable income and not the entire income. Obviously, kids w/ allowances and pt jobs might dedicate all or some, but for the rest of us adults, we have mortgages, food, electricity, insurance etc. that "should" come first over the hobby. Its not practical for an entire income to be spent on a hobby. Not to mention that if you have kids in sports or other interests, its hard to find time. People are just as busy, and probably even more-so.

W/O dragging the political situation into it fully, our economy is crap, costs are rising and elements have to suffer, often a hobby. Costs are on the rise, nothing is cheap, nor was it ever cheap, but its comes down to what takes priority.

The trade off is people want the costs affordable, and the mfger. can't just "break even". There is no real win win. People have to except that it does take a bit of money. Other forms of Motorsports are expensive too. People mention motorcycles, gocarts etc. nice fun hobbies, but more $$ to get started. RC you don't always need the top-of-the-line stuff to be competitive. If you want to be fast, the equipment helps, but if you can't get around the track, the most expensive ESC and fastest motor wont do a bit of good.

Really, its environment. My local track is great about people sharing info, being helpful and friendly. If you are a newb, people will gladly help you out. The overall focus is close competitive racing,which makes it more exciting. To counter that, i know of tracks that have a totally different feel. People are cold and the fast guys just want to be the fastest. That type of environment is going to be a fast turn off. I tell people this sport/hobby is meant to be fun and relaxing, not add to my already increased stress level.

if you really want to get more focus, look at setting up at trade shows. How about "sportsman shows". RC is OUTDOOR! Everytown no matter the size has a fair at some point. Try getting an area set up at a local fair, showcase some driving and maybe even hold a race. Other events like car shows are a great place to show off. Esp those guys who can make little replicas to run around. The truckbed of RCs is great! WTG!!

I myself am affiliated w/ a couple of Tuner shops in the area. They are working at having on track drift events at the local track and ive taken my RC drift car and driven around. Since then, several other people have broken down and got drift cars as well. In may, im helping organize a drift expo at an LHS. I hope it draws in lots of interest. If nothing else, exposure!


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Old 04-10-2008, 02:11 PM   #116
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IMO this hobby isn't dwindling. It's just being spread thin with so many segments in Racing specifacally. You have your electric off road, Nitro off road, Micro races, Nitro onroad, A million variations of electric on road...

The manufacturers and publications have done a good job IMO of getting exposure to the right people.

What I wished R/C companies would do is instead of having its own hobby expo. IMO it would be better to just get a wing in a real car show specifically for radio control vehicles.... Not unless they are try to avoid licencing fees for some of the bodies with a certain likeness to the real cars...
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Old 04-10-2008, 02:25 PM   #117
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Well Derek, then Traxxas didn't do their homework. Advertising is of course expensive in a magazine like Motortrend. A magazine like Import Tuner or Dirtbike would be considerably cheaper because the reader base is significantly smaller but packed with potential customers that have yet to be exposed to the high level of todays RC vehicles. In addition, Motortrend has a much wider demographic that includes many who would not have an interest in RC at all. The demographic as I can see it are going to be mainly male with interests in mechanics/electronics who are handy with tools; like speed and performance in their machinery; gadget oriented; competitive with a video game mentality; age ranges 11-17, 18-25 and 25-45 (each has their own marketing angles); own motorcylces/hot rods/ORVs; like the outdoors. Motortrend's demographic targets more consumer oriented crowd. People who are looking to buy a vehicle and want some direction as to what to choose. Your typical wrench head is not as likely to purchase that magazine as they would 5.0 Mustang or Car Craft magazine that is more geared toward the wrench head mentality.

Could you tell me when the ad was placed and what issue, I would like to look at it and analyze it. It could also be the marketing angle they took on the ads they put in the magazine. Did they research the mags target audience? Did they design the ad specifically to that audience or was it a generic ad (generic multi-pub ads only work with well recognized brands)? Was the main creative piece the Traxxas logo or a strong headline with supporting photography?

Traxxas out of all RC manufacturers has the best chance to really go all the way due to the very competitive RTR sets that they offer. Seeing as how they are branching out into other pubs, they know it too. My guess is that they do not have a very large marketing dept. Companies like that most likely have their marketing done through the owners and/or CEOs who coordinate with a low-end agency to save money on paying an entire marketing team. Budgets are tricky so I understand but by advertising in Motortrend they have proven to me at least that they haven't really thought it through well enough, and that is because many people at these companies probably change hats throughout the workweek...lots of multitasking so it is understandable. It also means that there is room for improvement.

I am working out a marketing plan that I would use to lift this off the ground. When I has out details and develop some basic creative I will post it here.

Thanks again for everyone's participation. I love marketing and promotions and it is a joy for me to be able to have such a great platform to gain valuable info from. I got about 2 more weeks of craziness then things should settle down for me a bit once I switch jobs.
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Old 04-10-2008, 03:04 PM   #118
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Personnally, I think most rc mags are crap. I have subscriptions... for what ads ??? The same old tips and articles ..... Crawlers .... Misleading reviews........ Shall i go on.... I get better race reporting on the interweb.

Maybe some of the project builds are pretty cool but other then that they are all ads.... I wanna see a bad review of a r/c car cause there are plenty out there.

Just my opinion of rc mags.
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Old 04-10-2008, 03:18 PM   #119
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Personnally, I think most rc mags are crap. I have subscriptions... for what ads ??? The same old tips and articles ..... Crawlers .... Misleading reviews........ Shall i go on.... I get better race reporting on the interweb.

Maybe some of the project builds are pretty cool but other then that they are all ads.... I wanna see a bad review of a r/c car cause there are plenty out there.

Just my opinion of rc mags.
Of course your opinion of is yours. And I guess your opinion is better than those who do it for a living.

What you fail to understand is that RC has a fixed amount of content with a revolving door of new people. I wish I didn't get the same questions year in and year out then we wouldnt' have to re-do articles. But people come into the hobby every day and dont' know simple things..so they are repeated.

What reviews are misleading? A review is the experience of the author. Your opinion is the experience of you.


I always love this "bad review" bull crap. What is a bad car? If you're a racer you can't look past that 90% of the people don't give a rats ass if it corners better than the last model. People want bad reviews so they somehow feel better about themselves. I can tell you the times we pointed out problems and then people (the owners of the cars we reviewed) then decide they don't think we know what we are doing...or how about the fact that we introduced a dyno that showed there was misleading advertising going on? We then found out that people wanted to be lied to because they thought our dyno was wrong.

In the end a magazine is a source of entertainment and some education. Those who are on the web and think they know everything and have done everything...usually don't know. It's much easier to come on the web and challenge everything to try and look like a better driver. and the web usually supports that crap. I don't believe anything because every thing is crap...rAHAH BLAHH wwahahh.

There is a point in RC that you should know how to do everything, but that doesn't mean where you learned things and go information is bad.

Yes there are some BS reviews out there, I'd even say some people in magazines really don't know how to drive that well, but in general they are helping the industry by promoting it in a good light.

My Tamiya Falcon was the most fun I had with an RC car. I was 11 and loved every second of it...it fails in racing, but RC is more than just a lap time.
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Old 04-10-2008, 03:28 PM   #120
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Well Derek, then Traxxas didn't do their homework. Advertising is of course expensive in a magazine like Motortrend. A magazine like Import Tuner or Dirtbike would be considerably cheaper because the reader base is significantly smaller but packed with potential customers that have yet to be exposed to the high level of todays RC vehicles. In addition, Motortrend has a much wider demographic that includes many who would not have an interest in RC at all. The demographic as I can see it are going to be mainly male with interests in mechanics/electronics who are handy with tools; like speed and performance in their machinery; gadget oriented; competitive with a video game mentality; age ranges 11-17, 18-25 and 25-45 (each has their own marketing angles); own motorcylces/hot rods/ORVs; like the outdoors. Motortrend's demographic targets more consumer oriented crowd. People who are looking to buy a vehicle and want some direction as to what to choose. Your typical wrench head is not as likely to purchase that magazine as they would 5.0 Mustang or Car Craft magazine that is more geared toward the wrench head mentality.

Could you tell me when the ad was placed and what issue, I would like to look at it and analyze it. It could also be the marketing angle they took on the ads they put in the magazine. Did they research the mags target audience? Did they design the ad specifically to that audience or was it a generic ad (generic multi-pub ads only work with well recognized brands)? Was the main creative piece the Traxxas logo or a strong headline with supporting photography?

Traxxas out of all RC manufacturers has the best chance to really go all the way due to the very competitive RTR sets that they offer. Seeing as how they are branching out into other pubs, they know it too. My guess is that they do not have a very large marketing dept. Companies like that most likely have their marketing done through the owners and/or CEOs who coordinate with a low-end agency to save money on paying an entire marketing team. Budgets are tricky so I understand but by advertising in Motortrend they have proven to me at least that they haven't really thought it through well enough, and that is because many people at these companies probably change hats throughout the workweek...lots of multitasking so it is understandable. It also means that there is room for improvement.

I am working out a marketing plan that I would use to lift this off the ground. When I has out details and develop some basic creative I will post it here.

Thanks again for everyone's participation. I love marketing and promotions and it is a joy for me to be able to have such a great platform to gain valuable info from. I got about 2 more weeks of craziness then things should settle down for me a bit once I switch jobs.

Please don't take this the wrong way, but I'm sure Traxxas did their homework. Advertising and marketing were not invented yesterday. They run in MT, have run in a variety of "mens interest magazines."

I say this as what I feel when I read magazines I like, in a sea of "tuner ads" Traxxas or any RC car company will not get a lot of response from Import Tuner. I think the demographic is slightly similar but those people are spending their money on their civic and not an RC car. But that's up for debate. The same argument can be used to ask why Tuner companies don't advertise in RC since we have the same demo...it's because (and why special interest magazine exist) is that people want a magazine about what they are interested in. If I bought an "tuner mag" and it was full of RC cars...wouldn't I want it to be an RC car mag?

It's very easy to think you can just throw an ad in something and see a big response. Advertising is a long term commitment that requires a lot of money regardless of where it's placed.

Traxxas sponsors a Monster truck in the monster jam series, is doing stuff in other motorsports (as well as HPI) sometimes i think if people don't know these things they really don't know the market or what has been done in the past to show off the hobby.

As I said, there is lots of ways to improve what's being done. But it takes more than a plan, it takes money, time, and energy. Something we lack in this industry.

You want to change the industry look to try and get the manufacturers to form an organization to join forces in promoting. I wrote an editorial about how CHEESE and MILK have commercials on TV....CHEESE and MILK.
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