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To all the newcomers of r/c

To all the newcomers of r/c

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Old 04-25-2007, 06:14 PM
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Before the T-maxx there was not a main steam market for hobby grade rtr r/c cars. Instead, if you wanted to jump in to the main stream of the hobby you had to build the kit your self. Typicaly the first kit did seem like a daunting challenge at first view. However, after taking a look at the instructions and keeping in mind that the guy at the lhs who rung you up is normaly a friendly and very helpful guy it isn't all that dificult to assemble a kit. After a second look over the instructions it become apearant that building a kit was basicly like building a lego kit w/ screws. It all snaps togather easily and gives you lots of self satisfaction that the car has your own personal touch. Any hobby grade r/c kit was built by some one. Odds are it went togather very easily for them too. Here is a quick run down on what you need and what it takes to build a kit.

-A set of hardened hex drivers, nut drivers, and something to pre-thread the holes with is essential to building any kit. You can typicaly pick up a cheap racheting screw driver w/ nut drivers at your local hardwear store for $10 or so. Then you can pick up the hardened hex drivers at your lhs along w/ something to pre-thread your holes.

-You need a good building area, some where you can devote to being messy for acouple days w/out having to worry about some one moving things around.

-Next up you need several things for a good building area. You need a couple boxes to hold the parts that are in open bags so that you can easily find and grab them, small plastic containers work well. You also need a beach towel to work over, two if you are sitting over a table so one can go on the table and one can go under your legs. These will keep small parts from bouncing off a hard surface and becoming dificult to find. It will make the assembly process much easier. It is often times a good idea to pick up a screw kit for the car when you purchase it so that you will always have screws handy incase you do happen to lose some or strip some.

-When you build the kit all you have to do is follow the directions. Always pay attention to detail, the directions are typicaly extremely detailed so if something looks off, then it is off. If it doesn't fit right then it probly isn't correct. If you pay attention to the details, what screws go where and such then it will snap and screw togather just like a lego kit would.

-If you ever get stuck at any point then pick up your car and go up the the lhs where you purchased it from. Ask them what you need to do. You just dropped a huge wad in his shop so if hes not willing to help you then go and kick him in the balls and go to the next shop. The hobby is a long term investment so shop owners will be willing to help you out if it means that it will bring future business. If they don't like dealing with customers and r/c cars then they sure as hell picked the wrong ocupation.

-If you plan on racing then keep in mind that you can get help setting up your car from most local tracks.

-Before you make a purchase be sure you know what you are getting. Do your research and find out about maintenance, durability, wear, and performance. When it comes to picking a new car just about any competition designed car is going to be very fast in the right hands. However, some cars are harder to work on then others and will not last as long. Instead of asking for people's opinions on what is the fastest and biggest ask what is the most durable and the best bang for the buck. You are new to the hobby and do not know everything so this first vehicle is going to have to survive your learning curve. It will make it a whole lot easier to enjoy the hobby if the vehicle you pick out lasts your learning curve and then some. When you make a purchase make sure that your budget can afford to replace broken parts and worn out parts. It is better to have a decent car w/ tons of support then to have an amazing car with no support.



-Lastly, enjoy the build. It is your machine and the end result will reflect your patience and effort taken to build the car properly.

Last edited by party_wagon; 05-17-2007 at 06:40 PM.
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Old 04-25-2007, 06:29 PM
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that should help some new people, it prolly wouldve helped me when i first began. but thats a good idea.
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Old 04-26-2007, 10:26 AM
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TTT
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Old 05-17-2007, 12:41 PM
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I added a few things.
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Old 05-17-2007, 01:30 PM
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Great advise! If you follow it you will eliminate commonly made mistakes.

When someone buys their first RC vehicle they also need to understand that they will have to repair something sooner or later. Because no matter how good you build it or drive it, It's only a matter of time before something goes wrong. Sometimes it's your fault and other times it isnt.

When that time arrives, you need to use good common sense and sound problem solving techniques and be patient.

One thing that I try to do is to get a used version of whatever car I'm into driving. A used Team T4 roller can be had on Ebay for $100 or less all day long. That way I am always sure to have plenty of spacers, eclips, o-rings, set screws, etc if I break something and the part is lost in the dirt or grass.
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Old 05-17-2007, 01:54 PM
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great post
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Old 05-17-2007, 06:08 PM
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I'd like to add that it's helpful to lay down a white towel on your build area. That way it is easier to see any parts you may drop as well as keeping them from bouncing off.
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Old 05-18-2007, 01:50 PM
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agreed... you try finding tiny diff screws on a patterned beach towel.. uh.. (but magnets work for steel parts)
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Old 05-18-2007, 02:32 PM
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You may talk to the forum mods and see about making this a sticky and adding helpful stuff to it from time to time.
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