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Old 01-02-2007, 06:13 PM   #1
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Default Racing Motors ???

Im looking for a Motor to put in my XXX-CR that will smoke the tires like nothing... lol

Sooo. Im gonna race at the indoor tracks so i cant have a brushless motor which i would like the Novak 3.5..

So what it the best motor and the best servo for the job???

And since im a lil new to the electric department, explain the difference between a 19 turn motor and a 7 turn ect? why would you even get the 19 since the lower is better?

And whats the quickest servo i should look into>?
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Old 01-02-2007, 06:35 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catchm3srt
Im looking for a Motor to put in my XXX-CR that will smoke the tires like nothing... lol

Sooo. Im gonna race at the indoor tracks so i cant have a brushless motor which i would like the Novak 3.5..

So what it the best motor and the best servo for the job???

And since im a lil new to the electric department, explain the difference between a 19 turn motor and a 7 turn ect? why would you even get the 19 since the lower is better?

And whats the quickest servo i should look into>?
Ummm... can i ask a silly question?

Why does the fact you race indoor affect your ability to run brushless?

So... here's the thing... if you need to ask what a 7 turn is, i can gurantee you that you're not ready for one lol. Read on....

Assuming you know the basic jist of an electric motor, the "turns" describes the number of times the wire has been wrapped around the armature.

Less turns = more RPM but less torque. Needs shorter gearing to overcome its lack of torque, but makes up for it with its higher RPM.
Higher turns = less RPM but more torque. Needs taller gearing to overcome its lack of RPM (and also to utilise its torque advantage)

Why even consider a 19 turn? Track size, gearing and maintenance.

A short, tight, technical track may be better suited to a 19turn, it has more torque and you dont need huge RPM if the straights are fairly short. To run a 7 turn on this short track, you'll need to gear it down big time... and will loose a lot of that top speed advantage.

If you have, well, an oval where you can keep the buggy at full speed - obviously the higher rpm motor is going to excel here, as torque isnt a huge issue if you dont need to slow down/speed up.

Maintenance.

A 7 turn (i dont think anyone runs 7 turn motors in offroad, but let's stick with it for an example) will need to be dismantled and have its commutator (surface where electric current passes to the electromagnet in the motor) cut on a special lathe... probably after every race meet, if not... during the race meet itself. These are very 'high stress' motors - constantly fighting to overcome their lack of torque (this generates a lot of heat and wears the commutator quickly) and when they do get up to those amazing RPMs, it wears everything out like hell.

A 19 turn, you can prob get away with cutting the commutator a few times each racing season.

Of course there's a lot more factors to it... wont even go into motor timing... but they're the basics...

Servos? Get the strongest, quickest one you can afford.
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Old 01-02-2007, 06:52 PM   #3
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Most tracks dont allow Brushless motors.. Id prefer a brushless since theres not as much maintenance. I know a lil about the motors but didnt know that it affects the hp/torque factor so thanks for clearing that up. lol

So lets say if i was to run nothing but the track..
1. I should probly be best off getting like a 13-16 turn motor right?
What brand should i look into? and What about the Speed Control?

2. Whats the quickest Servo you would prefer?

Ive been racing nitro for about 4yrs now so im very rusty on the Electric.. lol


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bit_Rusty
Ummm... can i ask a silly question?

Why does the fact you race indoor affect your ability to run brushless?

So... here's the thing... if you need to ask what a 7 turn is, i can gurantee you that you're not ready for one lol. Read on....

Assuming you know the basic jist of an electric motor, the "turns" describes the number of times the wire has been wrapped around the armature.

Less turns = more RPM but less torque. Needs shorter gearing to overcome its lack of torque, but makes up for it with its higher RPM.
Higher turns = less RPM but more torque. Needs taller gearing to overcome its lack of RPM (and also to utilise its torque advantage)

Why even consider a 19 turn? Track size, gearing and maintenance.

A short, tight, technical track may be better suited to a 19turn, it has more torque and you dont need huge RPM if the straights are fairly short. To run a 7 turn on this short track, you'll need to gear it down big time... and will loose a lot of that top speed advantage.

If you have, well, an oval where you can keep the buggy at full speed - obviously the higher rpm motor is going to excel here, as torque isnt a huge issue if you dont need to slow down/speed up.

Maintenance.

A 7 turn (i dont think anyone runs 7 turn motors in offroad, but let's stick with it for an example) will need to be dismantled and have its commutator (surface where electric current passes to the electromagnet in the motor) cut on a special lathe... probably after every race meet, if not... during the race meet itself. These are very 'high stress' motors - constantly fighting to overcome their lack of torque (this generates a lot of heat and wears the commutator quickly) and when they do get up to those amazing RPMs, it wears everything out like hell.

A 19 turn, you can prob get away with cutting the commutator a few times each racing season.

Of course there's a lot more factors to it... wont even go into motor timing... but they're the basics...

Servos? Get the strongest, quickest one you can afford.
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Old 01-02-2007, 06:59 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catchm3srt
Most tracks dont allow Brushless motors.. I

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Old 01-02-2007, 07:08 PM   #5
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Thats what i said when i went to www.larrysperformancercs.com shop and they told me they dont allow brushless and if i planned on getting one my car wouldnt be allowed on there track.... lol
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Old 01-02-2007, 07:56 PM   #6
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What type of track do you run on besides indoor. Small and tight or large and open. I'll assume small and tight as most indoor tracks are. I would say get a Check point 13 or 14 double or an Orion V2 in the same turns. I would also suggest starting out in stock since you are new to electric. These little cars are very fragile compared to the larger nitros. Stock is a very good starting point. History has also shown that some of the best races were using stock motors. At least around the north west they have been. Speedo and servo are your personal preferance. I run a LRP quantum competition and Airtronics 94757 digital servo.
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Old 01-02-2007, 08:28 PM   #7
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Most people that run stock and 19T do it because they are running in a spec class and those are the only allowed motors. Only in mod class can you run any motor size you want. Being that the guy said that brushless motors are not allowed is telling me that their electric classes are not mod classes because brushless would be allowed if they are following ROAR rules. You really should find out what classes they are running and get the appropiate motor for that class otherwise you might end up with a motor you cannot use.
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Old 01-02-2007, 08:42 PM   #8
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If you want info on larry's ask in the michigan forums:
rcracingextreme forums (michigan racers)

They probably told you no brushless b/c they run stock and or 19 turn. I don't see any other reason for them to tell you no on brushless. Stock and 19 turn are spec classes and the brushless isn't in the specs, even the 13.5 yet. If they have mod classes then I see no reason for not running brushless since it's an open class. Anyhow there is a thread on larry's at those forums and the guys were quick to answer my questions there. The larry's thread is in the offroad section either the first or second page.

Do you race nitro in mich? If so I'm sure we've been at the same tracks sometime. As far as outdoor I love the brushless running in mod class. No maintenance is a big, big plus!!

There is a track in Port Huron that will let you run brushless. It's carpet offroad. They run mostly a stock run what ya brung kinda thing. Meaning if you show up with a mod motor you can still run.
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Old 01-02-2007, 09:04 PM   #9
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I strongly support the call to try your hand with a stock motor.

FYI, that's a 27 turn motor... bushings (instead of bearings) with, basically, an untamperable can. Brushes and springs become the key tools for tuning.

Might seem a bit slow for someone who's been racing gas... but stock is all about picking the fast lines. Electric 2wd is a very different ball game to gas 4wd...

Will also allow you to "ease" into the intricacies of motor maintentance... as you wont have to pull a stock motor apart every 5 minutes lol.
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Old 01-02-2007, 10:11 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bit_Rusty
Will also allow you to "ease" into the intricacies of motor maintentance... as you wont have to pull a stock motor apart every 5 minutes lol.
No... just every 9 minutes. Damn things.
However, Bit_Rusty is right on. Where I race there are 3 levels of stock racing based on experience. It is very competative, and the times are right there with 19t/Mod.
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Old 01-03-2007, 09:07 PM   #11
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I have just started running a 19T in the mod class here in the Houston area. Gear it like a stock motor and it is usually fast enough. I run a 19T with bearings, gearing a BK2 with the stock spur and a 22 pinion. The front end is just bouncing going down the straights. BTW I have not been passed on the straights, just out driven by the local experts.
Get the quickest servo you can afford.
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Old 01-04-2007, 05:58 AM   #12
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now ya see im experienced with the control of the car already. Thing is.. One of my friends in getting the same exact car as me and he wants to make his fast as hell ect. Soooo. Im obviously going to try to be better than his.
I talked to a few people at the shop and they said you can run modded motors and that a 10 turn would be perfect. So im eather thinking about getting eather a 10 or 11 turn more since youll have a lil more torque with the other.
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Old 01-04-2007, 07:35 AM   #13
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That being the case, I would go with a 10x2, 10x3, or a 10x4. Get ya some LiPo batts. More voltage.
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Old 01-04-2007, 09:41 AM   #14
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If your running a 2wd buggy or Truck, good luck getting that 10 turn hooked up.
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Old 01-04-2007, 03:59 PM   #15
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What is the best motor for a Lazer ZX?
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