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Battery Layout

Old 07-27-2020, 08:48 AM
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So I'm a little confused. Everyone knows that your vehicle will handle better if the weight is more centered. It is a scientific fact. Now here's my question: why are 1/10 buggies being designed so the battery is mounted perpendicular on the rather than parallel on the chassis? I'm told it is for weight control, but at the same time, everyone is adding weights to their cars.
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Old 07-27-2020, 09:07 AM
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if it's to centered you don't get any roll and then the handling will suck, also, if the battery goes lengtwise then the speedo has to be raised wich raises the C.O.G.
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Old 07-27-2020, 09:35 AM
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Originally Posted by OffRoadJunkie View Post
Everyone knows that your vehicle will handle better if the weight is more centered. It is a scientific fact.
I think this is where you've gone wrong... there are so many other factors to handling other than how centered the weight is laterally.

The big difference with having the battery across the chassis is that you can move more of the weight around from front to back. As well as allowing more room for 'lay down' style transmission and motor placement. The recent trend towards higher grip surfaces makes it more important to get weight forward for steering, and to keep it low for cornering speed.

Another consideration is manufactures producing a chassis that can be adjusted for dirt/carpet and this requires a wider range of forward/rear adjustment than can be provided with the battery in line with the chassis.

If you want to try it there is plenty of space there, you can use double sided tape to attach a battery in line, or use one of the 'square' packs.
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Old 07-27-2020, 10:03 AM
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Thanks guys. That all makes sense.
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Old 07-27-2020, 12:18 PM
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Yep, don't bother trying it. It would never work.


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Old 07-28-2020, 08:23 PM
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Old 07-29-2020, 08:52 AM
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SO, let me ask you all this... With the suspension arms being getting longer on the buggies, have any of you used front or rear stabilizer bars on them? What was the difference in handling and what type of track was it?
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Old 07-29-2020, 10:04 AM
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Definitely have used anti-roll bars on both ends of the car for 1/10 touring car, buggy and truck on carpet with slick tires, as well as the 1/8 buggies on dirt loose dirt tracks.

The roll bars tend to decrease chassis roll and traction from that end of the car relative to the other. So a stiffer rear roll bar can make the rear slide a little more/give more steering. Stiffer front anit-roll bar can lock in the rear and reduce steering.

I was having some trouble with the rear inside wheel lifting when cornering hard and fast with my stadium truck this week, so I added a stiffer rear anti roll bar to reduce the chassis roll, keeping the rear more flat around the corner.
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Old 07-29-2020, 03:07 PM
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Originally Posted by OffRoadJunkie View Post
SO, let me ask you all this... With the suspension arms being getting longer on the buggies, have any of you used front or rear stabilizer bars on them? What was the difference in handling and what type of track was it?
The arms on the tlr cars have stayed the same length for a long time. I just compared a 22 5.0 arm to an arm from a XX-4 and the hinge pin holes are very nearly perfectly in line with one another. There is a maximum track width, and because the pivots can only be so close to each other, the arms have pretty much coalesced around a certain length.

Sway bars are just a spring in the roll dimension. Since our cars don't have decoupled roll and heave dampening our shocks have to dampen in both dimensions. Roll center is another adjustment that controls how the car rolls independently of how it handles bumps and jumps. On bumpy tracks sway bars usually make the car more nervous.

Originally Posted by mushroomed View Post
Definitely have used anti-roll bars on both ends of the car for 1/10 touring car, buggy and truck on carpet with slick tires, as well as the 1/8 buggies on dirt loose dirt tracks.

The roll bars tend to decrease chassis roll and traction from that end of the car relative to the other. So a stiffer rear roll bar can make the rear slide a little more/give more steering. Stiffer front anit-roll bar can lock in the rear and reduce steering.

I was having some trouble with the rear inside wheel lifting when cornering hard and fast with my stadium truck this week, so I added a stiffer rear anti roll bar to reduce the chassis roll, keeping the rear more flat around the corner.
If your truck is picking up the inside rear tire it is because it is rolling too much in the front.
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Old 07-30-2020, 11:35 AM
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Originally Posted by waitwhat View Post
If your truck is picking up the inside rear tire it is because it is rolling too much in the front.
Thanks, the stiffer rear sway bar helped but I'll try softening the front one instead next time at the track.
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Old 07-30-2020, 04:30 PM
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Originally Posted by mushroomed View Post
Thanks, the stiffer rear sway bar helped but I'll try softening the front one instead next time at the track.
The front is rolling too much, you need a stiffer front sway bar. Going into the corner the largest force is going to be at the front. Set you truck on the table and compress the right front shock all the way, notice the left rear is the one that comes off the ground. I'd reccomend going back to whichever sway bar you had previously run in the back, and go with a stiffer bar up front. I bet it gives you better lap times and prevents the inside rear tire from lifting into a corner.
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Old 07-31-2020, 05:02 PM
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This could also be adjusted by increasing the shock oil weight on the front suspension to slow down low speed compression.
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Old 08-01-2020, 12:22 AM
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Originally Posted by OffRoadJunkie View Post
I'm told it is for weight control, but at the same time, everyone is adding weights to their cars.

The trick is being able to put the weight where you want it, and add or move it for different tracks or surfaces.
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