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Pinion gears..

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Old 10-22-2017, 07:34 AM
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Default Pinion gears..

So I just had the pleasure of grinding off a pinion gear last night. Not fun trying to keep crap out of brushless motors.

That said, I want to change all my pinions to something I can buy an actual decent wrench for instead of L Allen wrenches.

Problem is there is about a million difference opinions on what size wrench for what kind of pinions. Iím thinking of upgrading to TLR or Team Trinity pinions. Does anyone know what exact wrench will work with either of these?

The best I found here was one person at the end of a thread that called out a 1.5mm hex key for TLR pinions.
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Old 10-22-2017, 09:43 AM
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Wow, no one knows?
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Old 10-22-2017, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by {tpc} View Post
Wow, no one knows?
1.5mm will be for the TLR pinions. The trinity will either be 1.5mm, 1.3mm or .050".

Regardless of which you chose, you need to be sure you have top quality hex drivers to help prevent stripping future screws. I recommend at least one MIP hex driver just for your pinion gears. Or a full set of hex drivers for all of your rc needs.
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Old 10-22-2017, 11:02 AM
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Ok thank you. I have a set of new tools on the way. Not doing this a second time lol.
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Old 10-22-2017, 11:59 AM
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I’ll toss out another dumb ?....is 3.17 bore size the standard for a regular 17.5 brushless motor?
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Old 10-22-2017, 12:05 PM
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Originally Posted by {tpc} View Post
Iíll toss out another dumb ?....is 3.17 bore size the standard for a regular 17.5 brushless motor?
Lol no question is a dumb question my friend. Yes 3.17mm or 1/8" is the standard for 17.5 as well as most other 1/10 scale motors. If the shaft is any bigger it is generally mentioned in the motor's description or specs
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Old 10-22-2017, 04:18 PM
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Nothing in the motor screws or pinions should be tighter than can be done with a standard allen key. That being said its kinda a pain to tell the difference between a 1.5mm and 1/16" allen key and the writing is pretty tiny. I would recommend a metric set of MIP drivers. That set comes with a 2.5mm,2mm and a 1.5mm. That will do 90% of the work you will run into on most RCs. A very few cars will use a 3mm head( schumacher ) and if your working on older Losi or AE rigs they will be SAE.

As far as pinions go some changed to metric threads and some are still SAE. The Losi ones are a 1.5mm driver and the Trinity are a 1/16. The only .50 I know of are the 175rc or other slot car style plastic pinions.

So to answer your original question you will need a 1.5mm and 1/16 to take advantage of 95% of the pinions your gonna run into for 1/10 scale, once you have good fitting tools its very easy to tell the difference as 1.5mm will be very loose in a 1/16 grub screw. Get the metric set and add a 1/16.

There is a certain feel to setting up the proper mesh, even now this is the way I do it this way.

For 48p gears, select a pinion 2 teeth larger than what you want to run. Put it on and push the mesh up firm and tighten the motor screws, there should be full contact between the gears. Now loosen the set screw and remove that pinion and put the one on you want to use. Perfect mesh every time.
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Old 10-22-2017, 05:04 PM
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Thanks, appreciate the guidance. Despite how it sounds I’m a racer from way back. I’ve never had this happen before, hence why all the questions so I can be sure it does not happen again. Not sure how or why it happened this time, but it did. I had even been using a fresh Allen key, and specifically segregated it for pinion duty and nothing more. I guess it must have been slightly off, enabling me to strip out the set screw while also getting an above average bite on the motor shaft. Then I could not find a tool or a way to remove it without getting messy.

Hopefully the new tools and new gears will help me to not have this happen again.
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Old 10-23-2017, 12:41 AM
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Those L-shaped allen keys are made of really soft metal, so they can easily round and strip screw heads. The MIP drivers are are hardened steel tips. best in the business and the only ones I use! I have two sets, one with the handles and another set of speed tips to use in my electric screw driver.
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Old 10-23-2017, 05:37 AM
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Set screws should always come out effortlessly... if you find that you really have to crank hard to loosen the screw, then chances are you will more than likely strip the bit. I like to keep a micro torch in my pit box to apply heat to any metal to metal fastener to melt the thread lock (typically in about 5 seconds) and easily unscrew any fasteners.

The OP also didn't specify what car he is running, I don't run TLR anymore but I want to say they use 2.0mm heads on the pinions for the 1/10 SCT... just to be safe, I would reference the owner manual to see what size wrenches your kit calls for.

I would invest in both a long handle wrench set as well as a power drill bit set to make it easier/faster to service your ride with a low voltage power drill with adjustable clutch.

Most racers I know will only recommend MIP, but I realize they can be kinda pricey, I've found a happy medium with EDS bits and they tend to last a couple years before I have to replace the 2.0mm bits which tend to get the most use:

Power Tool Tips
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Old 12-04-2017, 09:14 PM
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Love MIP wrenches, except for pinions. I've favored the short Dynamite alum. Red handle wrench for pinions. Short tip and alum handle provide a good feel.
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Old 12-05-2017, 02:27 PM
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Yea, I stripped out a pinion set screw with my MIP driver. The MIP tip was too strong for the screw and obviously I went to far with it. What a bitch that was to get that pinion off.
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Old 12-05-2017, 09:57 PM
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I bet... lol
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Old 12-07-2017, 05:30 AM
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I ended up switching to all TLR pinions. I believe they are all 1.5 mm. That and I bought all new tools because I didn't feel like doing this again, and so far so good.

Of course since then, I've seen these polypro pinions I think they are called? They are lightweight plastic but the part that attached to the motor appears to be aluminum. I haven't switched to those yet, but I would if doing it all over again. The nice thing about those would be in a case where you might have to grind one off, it would be aluminum and therefore won't be attracted to the motor. Of course the downside is that it is aluminum and might strip in the hub, but a lot of folks are using them now and I haven't heard anything bad.
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Old 12-07-2017, 06:26 AM
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Originally Posted by JsK View Post

For 48p gears, select a pinion 2 teeth larger than what you want to run. Put it on and push the mesh up firm and tighten the motor screws, there should be full contact between the gears. Now loosen the set screw and remove that pinion and put the one on you want to use. Perfect mesh every time.
I had never heard that one before but I like it. I still use the old paper method which also works.

Cheers,
Jim
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