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3D Printed RC. The future?

3D Printed RC. The future?

Old 07-15-2013, 11:20 PM
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Default 3D Printed RC. The future?

Do you think in another 10 years the manufacturers will have to instead of selling kits, sell plans and possibly the raw materials, electronics, or parts that the then home 3d printers can't provide?

Before calling me crazy (we already knew that). Consider this. You can actually 3d print titanium as it is now, and they are working on carbide..
http://web.mit.edu/tdp/www/6.html
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Old 07-16-2013, 12:07 AM
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No probably not, but never know. It just takes too long and the material is too expensive. It would have to come down to about 10% of the current cost to be close to being worth bothering with it. Time will tell if this 3d thing is just a Fad, especially on the home front. For part prototyping it is great.

It would be cool thought if an rc manufacturer could have a content controlled way of streaming the part data to a printer. So you would go on their site, buy the product, hit print and it would send the part data directly to the printer. It would work in a pinch if you were stuck without a part. Probably would be more fragile than the molded part though.
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Old 07-16-2013, 03:27 AM
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Originally Posted by RCmayor View Post
No probably not, but never know. It just takes too long and the material is too expensive. It would have to come down to about 10% of the current cost to be close to being worth bothering with it. Time will tell if this 3d thing is just a Fad, especially on the home front. For part prototyping it is great.

It would be cool thought if an rc manufacturer could have a content controlled way of streaming the part data to a printer. So you would go on their site, buy the product, hit print and it would send the part data directly to the printer. It would work in a pinch if you were stuck without a part. Probably would be more fragile than the molded part though.
That's the big hurdle besides the time and cost as mentioned. There just isn't any way to provide the same mechanical properties. In the same way that regardless of advances in casting techniques, a forging is still superior. Lack of pressure when forming, lack of ability to use fiber reinforcement, lack of ability to develop and take advantage of grain flow, trying to bond a hot drop to a already cooled drop, etc. From a materials perspective there are several seemingly insurmountable challenges.

Are they wonderful for early prototyping and conceptual development, oh yeah. There will be limited applications, and they are fun to play with. For any significant chassis parts not too likely. I wouldn't be surprised if someone does offer plans for home builds, but they won't be competitive performance wise with properly molded components.

It is amazing to see all of the publicity and hype of the last year or so they have received.
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Old 07-16-2013, 01:46 PM
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Originally Posted by oXYnary View Post
Do you think in another 10 years the manufacturers will have to instead of selling kits, sell plans and possibly the raw materials, electronics, or parts that the then home 3d printers can't provide?

Before calling me crazy (we already knew that). Consider this. You can actually 3d print titanium as it is now, and they are working on carbide..
http://web.mit.edu/tdp/www/6.html
I saw on TV where a company used it's 3D printer to create a prosthetic arm for a child. It was amazing. Had fingers with joints and everything. They showed a kid actually using. So, I'm sure you could make it to where some RC Parts could be printed up. A whole car? Who knows.
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Old 07-16-2013, 03:56 PM
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The only way manufacturers are going to supply files you can then print off yourself is if you could download and print your parts as easily as printing a pdf today, with no calibration or machine maintenance needed. It is never going to get mainstream enough to bring the price of equipment down enough.

3D printing has been hyped up recently and if you have the money to buy a printer and time to learn how to use it then you would use it the same way model engineers have used lathes and milling machines for years without becoming mainstream either. The idea that you can get hold of a 3D file that can then be printed without needing any practical skills is what sells it, but the idea that everyone could 3D print anything falls down when you realise that you need to be able to convert the 3D file to match your 3D printer, and to set up and maintain the machine. If it was going to be mainstream we would already have everyone using CNC machines right now, and those can use the correct materials rather than having to make do with whatever the printer can process.

I work in prototyping and if you want to make parts that have similar properties to plain nylon then the technology has existed for years. The glass and carbon filled materials are impossible to reproduce without injection moulding or machining from a block. If you want to reproduce a current part, while most people only seem to think the way to do it is to draw up a 3D model then get it printed or machined, you can create a silicone mould and use industrial resins to create the material properties of any natural plastics and easily stronger than any 3D printed plastic part, in fact for prototype testing we are given 3d printed parts that we clean up and recast in industrial resin so they can act like the plastics they are supposed to represent.
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Old 07-16-2013, 05:06 PM
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I'll honesty think some of you don't know how far 3d printing is accelerating. In example:

" tor, the company used high-powered laser beams to melt and fuse fine metallic powders into three dimensional structures, rather than fashioning parts the traditional way with machines and manual labor.

This type of injector manufactured with traditional processes would take more than a year to make, but with these new processes it can be produced in less than four months, with a 70 percent reduction" http://www.foxnews.com/science/2013/...rocket-engine/

Also they can print with stem cells now... 8O

Per home use, I can see more advanced printers not being at homes but instead at a 3d Kinkos chain. Stl seems to be coming the most common format.
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Old 07-18-2013, 07:18 PM
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Imo when the better/ stronger plastics are available for the printers, we will all be fashioning parts & pieces. It might be 10 years from now, I reckon it will happen.
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Old 07-20-2013, 01:12 PM
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Those seem to be a couple applications where the various rapid prototyping processes better applies.

The prosthetic limbs generally can use a larger cross section sort of exoskeleton design compared to a relatively thin bone down the middle. Thus less material strength is needed. The biggest feature is perhaps easy adaptability to the growing child. Advances in this area are certainly encouraging to see.

The rocket engine injector besides thermal likely involves mostly a lot of high frequency shock waves. For this type of loading more of a sintered or cast material structure has advantages, the higher internal damping helps control and prevent resonance issues. Of course it always helps to have NASA money to spend.

I agree that various service bureaus will continue to grow, especially for the more advanced techniques. I think I heard that Staples is getting involved with 3D printing.

Stl has been the file format of choice as far as I am aware of pretty much since the beginning. Breaks the model into the slices that most all techniques use, printing, stereolithography, laminated object manufacture, etc. Many CAD programs now include stl output.
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Old 07-20-2013, 02:44 PM
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Originally Posted by oXYnary View Post
I'll honesty think some of you don't know how far 3d printing is accelerating. In example:

" tor, the company used high-powered laser beams to melt and fuse fine metallic powders into three dimensional structures, rather than fashioning parts the traditional way with machines and manual labor.

This type of injector manufactured with traditional processes would take more than a year to make, but with these new processes it can be produced in less than four months, with a 70 percent reduction" http://www.foxnews.com/science/2013/...rocket-engine/

Also they can print with stem cells now... 8O

Per home use, I can see more advanced printers not being at homes but instead at a 3d Kinkos chain. Stl seems to be coming the most common format.
i used a printer like you described to make a quad chassis. its made out of a fiber reinforced nylon. (and no, its not one of those home printers)

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