Go Back  R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Chat Lounge
What it takes to produce my own aftermarket parts??? >

What it takes to produce my own aftermarket parts???

What it takes to produce my own aftermarket parts???

Reply

Old 01-31-2013, 03:47 AM
  #16  
Tech Adept
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 176
Default

Originally Posted by JordanCatalano View Post
Tormach makes a sweet small CNC. $7000-$15000.

Unfortunately China can make parts for pennies on the dollar compared to the US.

Not only do you need good ideas, good design, good machining, but most importantly you will need GREAT marketing.

I would suggest getting a job in a machine shop to give you a better idea of what's actually involved with making parts or molds.

Look for a local "makers" group, they may have machines you can use.

As you are working on a Master's degree, I would brush up on the old English too.
Thats a sweet machine. it even has a scan tool where you can scan a part and gives you its dimensions but i dont think is as simple as it sounds. Is this like standard feature on all CNC machines?

+ YouTube Video
ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.
KELLES is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2013, 03:54 AM
  #17  
Tech Adept
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 176
Default

Originally Posted by mtpocketsracing View Post
here's the good news.
no one makes their own parts.
it doesn't make sense to. what they do is design their own parts and have a machine shop or foundry make them. even ford,gm etc don't make their own stuff. there are tons of foundries that are doing this.

for example here is a company not too far from where I live that makes car parts.
http://www.reliablecastings.com/

another example,
I know someone that works in a machine shop that makes missiles for northrop grumman.
Well my initial question was about what it takes to make my own parts not just designing them but actually producing them however from what i see thats nearly impossible but if i could actually design my parts and have a shop make them at a reasonable prices then that would be great too.
KELLES is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2013, 07:06 AM
  #18  
Tech Regular
iTrader: (4)
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Davenport, IA
Posts: 432
Trader Rating: 4 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by mtpocketsracing View Post
here's the good news.
no one makes their own parts.
even ford,gm etc don't make their own stuff. there are tons of foundries that are doing this.
Very poor example. Ford has quite a few foundries, and BANKS and BANKS of G&L's turning out engines.

I work for Deere, and we have our own foundry, and machining centers all over the place. The easiest way to keep control of a process, and to produce quality parts, is to make them yourself.

I personally wouldn't pigeon hole myself to just R/C parts, I would branch into firearm related as well. With the proper licensing of course, as there's a TON of cash there. There's a reason why all these gun shops on TV have a nice little Haas in the back room.

I would look into a tool and die apprenticeship type program, personally.
LightningStruck is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2013, 11:40 AM
  #19  
Tech Adept
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 176
Default

Its really funny that while i am studying for an exam which is tomorrow i drift for a while and start thinking about making rc parts . Well i was thinking that if a manage to learn how to right the code for certain parts in addition to drawing the part on a CAD software, this means that when i take my drawing of a part together with the code to a CNC shop, the cost of buying that part would reduce significantly. Am i right? Isnt coding a big part of this process?
KELLES is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2013, 02:41 PM
  #20  
Tech Regular
iTrader: (4)
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Davenport, IA
Posts: 432
Trader Rating: 4 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by KELLES View Post
Its really funny that while i am studying for an exam which is tomorrow i drift for a while and start thinking about making rc parts . Well i was thinking that if a manage to learn how to right the code for certain parts in addition to drawing the part on a CAD software, this means that when i take my drawing of a part together with the code to a CNC shop, the cost of buying that part would reduce significantly. Am i right? Isnt coding a big part of this process?
Coding is pretty simple now-a-days. You draw the part, it'll do the g-code. I would highly suggest getting the student copy of Solidworks(it's free). It's one of the most supported CAD-CAM packages around, and has some amazing features/abilities.

When I retire, or win the lottery(if either happens I'll be lucky), there's going to be a nice little Haas VF-2 in my shop.
LightningStruck is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2013, 05:45 PM
  #21  
Tech Master
iTrader: (8)
 
Gary NJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Long Island NY
Posts: 1,157
Trader Rating: 8 (100%+)
Default

You just need to do the designing part of the job, with your CAD program - in this case it sounds like Solidworks is what you're using. The manufacturer will take your CAD drawings and bring them into their CAM program, for example MasterCam, which they'll use to figure out how to make the part. How it will be held in the machine, where each feature will be machined, what tools will be used, and at what feeds and speeds. MasterCam will finally produce the G-code, which is the actual program that will run run in the CNC machine to produce the part. There is no way you could produce G-code for a machine that wasn't yours, and no one would ever just load your code and attempt to run it.

You'd be well served to take some courses in Manufacturing Technology at a local community college and get at least a basic understanding how all this works together. There is also lots of forum reading you can do. You can also take online courses - looking at tooling-u.com.

Since you don't sound like you have any real experience in any part of the business, my suggestion would be to work on the designing, marketing and business aspects first, and leave the actual manufacturing - which is very capital intensive, and requires a tremendous amount of technical skill - to others. You'll still be facing a very steep learning curve just handling those aspects. Good luck!
Gary NJ is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2013, 09:05 AM
  #22  
Tech Initiate
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 26
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

Someone commented earlier that it really doesn't matter how you make the part (or have it made), that it won't make economic sense unless you can find lots of buyers for it.

With RC style parts of pretty small dollar amounts, you are going to have to sell a ton (high volume) to hit your break-even point. Even if you're managing out of your home, you've still got overhead and marketing costs to cover, and you'll likely be making pretty thin margins when you cover freight, distribution, packaging, etc.

In terms of a marketing plan, there's a few basic steps I would think about:

1) Is the total market large enough? (Basically, is this a popular enough kit, and are there enough potential customers for the part)
2) Can I gain access to the buyers for this? (Will you be locked out of hobby shops and distributors because you're too small?)
3) How many, realistically, of the potential buyers you have access to will prefer your product, essentially what market share can you convert?
4) What's your projected margin after all variable costs?

When you multiply three times four you need to be ahead of your fixed costs. I imagine this would be hard to do with a brand new product and without access to the largest distributors.
misterbrister is offline  
Reply With Quote

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service