Go Back  R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Chat Lounge
How much do you tip? >

How much do you tip?

How much do you tip?

Old 09-20-2012, 12:45 AM
  #1  
Super Moderator
Thread Starter
iTrader: (31)
 
racer1812's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: RIP 'Chopper', 4/18/13 miss you bud:(
Posts: 15,365
Trader Rating: 31 (100%+)
Default How much do you tip?

Personally it all depends on the service. But I do leave more than 15% at greasy spoons where the food is cheap but good.

http://bites.today.com/_news/2012/09...e-you-eat?lite
racer1812 is offline  
Old 09-20-2012, 01:53 AM
  #2  
Tech Regular
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 317
Default

Depends.
If the service is average, I usually do 15-20%.
If it's exceptional (and it doesn't take much to impress me), I've been known to go as high as 100%, but exceptional service is pretty rare.
If the service sucks, I'll leave 2 bucks.

For someone to EXPECT 25 or 30% as standard is ridiculous. For a restaurant to have a "recommended gratuity" is insulting. Prices to dine out are on the rise as it is.

Recently, my wife's work group went out for dinner after a meeting. When they were done, they left what I'd consider a slightly higher than average tip for the waiter, and walked out to the parking lot. The waiter walked out after them and said "Here! You obviously need this more than I do!" and threw the money at them. Not really sure what that guy was expecting, but I'd have probably picked up the money and crammed it down his throat.

My sister was a waitress for many years and at times would come home with $1200+ in tips for one evening. Being a restaurant server can be tough work (I tried it once myself when I was a youngster), but I don't spend much time feeling obligated to tip high just because it's expected.

Everywhere you go now, there's a tip jar sitting on the counter, even places where no real "service" is provided.

Here's an average trip to the grocery store;
Walk in the front door- someone wants a donation for boy scouts, or something else I don't really care much about.
Stop at the Coffee kiosk before shopping- there's the tip jar.
Do your shopping and get to the register- the pin pad that you just swiped your ATM card though, asks if you want to donate $1 to some cause. I usually press "no" on this one, because I know what's coming next.
The cashier asks "Do you want to round that up to help out MD, or MS, or breast cancer, or whatever the charity of the week is?"
Out the door- more boy scouts.
Get the groceries to the car and just before you leave the lot, there's the guy with his "homeless, disabled veteran" sign.

Gawd, maybe it is cheaper to eat out.

People no longer do things out of kindness, concern, or appreciation. They do them because it's expected.
TedMosby is offline  
Old 09-20-2012, 03:25 AM
  #3  
Tech Champion
 
tc3team's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 6,151
Default

Originally Posted by TedMosby View Post
Depends.
For a restaurant to have a "recommended gratuity" is insulting. Prices to dine out are on the rise as it is.
+1.

Waiters are paid a salary, it's not as if they are volunteers...lol

If they do their job well they will get a reasonable tip from me.

If they don't or the food sucks, nope. No tip

Some people do expect too much these days.
tc3team is offline  
Old 09-20-2012, 08:01 AM
  #4  
Tech Addict
 
KDagh1's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 520
Default

In the US, tipping is everywhere. I personally hate the concept of it. I don't like the feeling of somebody begging me for something. I'm not proposing they should work for free. However, I would prefer it if people were just on a salary and even if prices were raised to account for this. But, I don't like leaving money on a table, and feeling that I am feeding somebody's family (or not). I work as a consultant. My clients have never tipped me, nor would I expect them to.
KDagh1 is offline  
Old 09-20-2012, 08:34 AM
  #5  
Tech Adept
iTrader: (6)
 
drolmaeye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Willowbrook, IL
Posts: 242
Trader Rating: 6 (100%+)
Default

I tip the generally accepted amount for a given situation in the service industry. If I will be using a service that I don't frequently use (and therefore may not know the generally accepted amount), I will google the proper etiquette beforehand.

For example, waitstaff always get a minimum of 15% (even in cases where the service is atrocious, however, I won't return to that establishment or server). But generally they should get 18-20% or more. For very low dollar amounts (e.g. breakfast at a diner) the percentage could be higher as there is a sort of minimum service fee for taking my order and running my food.

Restaurants suggest (or for large parties, automatically add) gratuities because the simple fact is that some people will not leave an appropriate amount otherwise. If you have a server spend all night doing cartwheels for a party of 14 and then get screwed on the tip, it can be extremely difficult after a while to make ends meet.

As for the example of a server sometimes bringing home $1200+ a night, all I can say is wow, but I can assure you, the number of servers that have taken home over $1000 in a single night EVER (let alone on a repeated basis) is only a small fraction of a percent. Many servers would consider themselves extremely lucky to average $100/night throughout an entire week (slow nights + good nights), and that just isn't that much money.

As far as tip jars at counters, that's up to the individual. I personally don't think it is appropriate to tip in that case (as counter workers typically make a full wage in exchange for expected duties/service), but one might choose to in any case if, for example, you eat in and allow an employee to clean up after you.

While I haven;t worked in the service industry for almost a decade, when I did, I was a bar tender at a well established and very successful bar. I had AMAZING days, but never brought in $1000. I had MANY customers who were employees in the service industry, and I don't know if anyone ever claimed to have such a night. I'm hoping some other people can chime in.
drolmaeye is offline  
Old 09-20-2012, 08:45 AM
  #6  
Suspended
iTrader: (11)
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 629
Trader Rating: 11 (87%+)
Default

depends what i get really, if i go in for a cup of coffee that is 1.15 leaving a 15% tip is kinda low, i would leave 100% tip 1.00 or 1.50 for tip. on meals for the famialy, 15%
alwayswin is offline  
Old 09-20-2012, 10:17 AM
  #7  
Tech Lord
iTrader: (38)
 
Oasis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: * Sin Cal *
Posts: 10,668
Trader Rating: 38 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by TedMosby View Post
Depends.
If the service is average, I usually do 15-20%.
If it's exceptional (and it doesn't take much to impress me), I've been known to go as high as 100%, but exceptional service is pretty rare.
If the service sucks, I'll leave 2 bucks.

For someone to EXPECT 25 or 30% as standard is ridiculous. For a restaurant to have a "recommended gratuity" is insulting. Prices to dine out are on the rise as it is.

Recently, my wife's work group went out for dinner after a meeting. When they were done, they left what I'd consider a slightly higher than average tip for the waiter, and walked out to the parking lot. The waiter walked out after them and said "Here! You obviously need this more than I do!" and threw the money at them. Not really sure what that guy was expecting, but I'd have probably picked up the money and crammed it down his throat.

My sister was a waitress for many years and at times would come home with $1200+ in tips for one evening. Being a restaurant server can be tough work (I tried it once myself when I was a youngster), but I don't spend much time feeling obligated to tip high just because it's expected.

Everywhere you go now, there's a tip jar sitting on the counter, even places where no real "service" is provided.

Here's an average trip to the grocery store;
Walk in the front door- someone wants a donation for boy scouts, or something else I don't really care much about.
Stop at the Coffee kiosk before shopping- there's the tip jar.
Do your shopping and get to the register- the pin pad that you just swiped your ATM card though, asks if you want to donate $1 to some cause. I usually press "no" on this one, because I know what's coming next.
The cashier asks "Do you want to round that up to help out MD, or MS, or breast cancer, or whatever the charity of the week is?"
Out the door- more boy scouts.
Get the groceries to the car and just before you leave the lot, there's the guy with his "homeless, disabled veteran" sign.

Gawd, maybe it is cheaper to eat out.

People no longer do things out of kindness, concern, or appreciation. They do them because it's expected.
Well pu..I'm just shocked that the Ca. DMV office doesn't have em..tip jars that is..
Oasis is offline  
Old 09-20-2012, 10:20 AM
  #8  
Tech Master
iTrader: (2)
 
kaiser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: new milford ct
Posts: 1,688
Trader Rating: 2 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by racer1812 View Post
Personally it all depends on the service. But I do leave more than 15% at greasy spoons where the food is cheap but good.
+1, if it's a really cheap place i'll go 50-100% if the service was really good.

the fancier the place the closer i get to 15-20%.

if the service is really bad then zero!
kaiser is offline  
Old 09-20-2012, 10:33 AM
  #9  
Tech Regular
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 317
Default

Originally Posted by drolmaeye View Post
Restaurants suggest (or for large parties, automatically add) gratuities because the simple fact is that some people will not leave an appropriate amount otherwise. If you have a server spend all night doing cartwheels for a party of 14 and then get screwed on the tip, it can be extremely difficult after a while to make ends meet.
True, but in this case it should be listed as a "service fee", not a gratuity/tip.

Originally Posted by drolmaeye View Post
As for the example of a server sometimes bringing home $1200+ a night, all I can say is wow, but I can assure you, the number of servers that have taken home over $1000 in a single night EVER (let alone on a repeated basis) is only a small fraction of a percent. Many servers would consider themselves extremely lucky to average $100/night throughout an entire week (slow nights + good nights), and that just isn't that much money.


While I haven;t worked in the service industry for almost a decade, when I did, I was a bar tender at a well established and very successful bar. I had AMAZING days, but never brought in $1000. I had MANY customers who were employees in the service industry, and I don't know if anyone ever claimed to have such a night. I'm hoping some other people can chime in.
I guess it depends largely on where you're at in the country. We lived in what you might call a "well to do" area at the time. In fact, around that time, i was working for a company building staircases, and I worked on a customer's banister for a week and when I was done, he tipped me 600 bucks, and said "take your wife out to dinner". I was making $32 an hour at the time, so I didn't have a tip jar next to my nail gun. I'm not saying any of this is common, and wait-staff is almost always quite under-paid, hourly, but for a restaurant owner to underpay it's staff and then list a "recommended" (minimum) gratuity, is ridiculous.
TedMosby is offline  
Old 09-20-2012, 10:37 AM
  #10  
Tech Regular
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 317
Default

Originally Posted by Oasis View Post
Well pu..I'm just shocked that the Ca. DMV office doesn't have em..tip jars that is..
Man, don't get me started on the effin DMV. Or the ventura county superior court for that matter. I just paid a ticket that my kid got....with my credit card, online, 320 bucks, and now I see they applied a second charge to my card, with no explanation, or authorization. This is gonna get ugly.
TedMosby is offline  
Old 09-20-2012, 10:55 AM
  #11  
Tech Elite
iTrader: (115)
 
nf_ekt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: 22 Acacia Avenue
Posts: 4,653
Trader Rating: 115 (100%+)
Default

I try to go about 20-30%. Depends on quality of service of course.

Back in the food delivery days, I became very familiar with the customers who tipped and those that would just stiff me. For some odd reason the ones that never tipped got their food last every time .
nf_ekt is offline  
Old 09-20-2012, 01:38 PM
  #12  
Tech Addict
iTrader: (8)
 
StarrRacing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Youngstown, OH
Posts: 678
Trader Rating: 8 (100%+)
Default

OOOooohh Wow Man.... I thought the title said how much do you "trip"....
.... I... I... I.. I haven't done that since the '70's Man....
StarrRacing is offline  
Old 09-20-2012, 01:57 PM
  #13  
Tech Master
iTrader: (59)
 
joelwhite's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,873
Trader Rating: 59 (100%+)
Default

Originally Posted by StarrRacing View Post
OOOooohh Wow Man.... I thought the title said how much do you "trip"....
.... I... I... I.. I haven't done that since the '70's Man....
Ha! Hope you didnt eat the brown!

joelwhite is offline  
Old 09-20-2012, 03:21 PM
  #14  
Tech Elite
iTrader: (115)
 
nf_ekt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: 22 Acacia Avenue
Posts: 4,653
Trader Rating: 115 (100%+)
Default

Ah... caps!!!
nf_ekt is offline  
Old 09-20-2012, 03:40 PM
  #15  
Tech Master
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,166
Default

Originally Posted by tc3team View Post
+1.

Waiters are paid a salary, it's not as if they are volunteers...lol

If they do their job well they will get a reasonable tip from me.

If they don't or the food sucks, nope. No tip

Some people do expect too much these days.
Waiters around here are paid something like $4 an hour, plus a percentage of the tips (all tips combined at the end of the night and divided up). That would really piss me off. Some nights you get a lot, some nights you get almost nothing. I like my solid $8.25 an hour pushing karts.
nerdyrcdriver is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.