Go Back  R/C Tech Forums > General Forums > Chat Lounge
Non-Competition Driving; Gyros For All My Cars... >

Non-Competition Driving; Gyros For All My Cars...

Like Tree14Likes

Non-Competition Driving; Gyros For All My Cars...

Reply

Old 11-02-2017, 06:43 PM
  #16  
Tech Apprentice
iTrader: (1)
 
jza70r's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 93
Trader Rating: 1 (100%+)
Default

Well your opening post had me sold on the gyro. But then other peoples comments about taking the skill out of driving has me doubting it. Still, I have a spare channel on my rx that in theory would allow me to turn the gyro on or off so if I come across a gyro I think id like to give it a try.

Thanks for sharing your experience with us
jza70r is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2017, 06:15 PM
  #17  
Tech Fanatic
 
slick2500's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Rapid City SD
Posts: 807
Default

Originally Posted by Roelof View Post
To be honest, a gyro in a car is crap. Do you want the real experience of racing and controling a car or just drive a car as dull as possible?

Setup and driving skils are more important than adding a gyro hiding all the faults in the setup and driving skils.
99% of people using gyros aren't racing. Gyros aren't legal in races anyway nor should they be. Gyros are for the average Tom, Dick and Harry who want to bash their rc car and not have to worry about having the perfect suspension setup on every single car. Gyros have their place that is it.
slick2500 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2017, 06:20 PM
  #18  
Tech Master
 
Dave_S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 1,492
Default

Don't knock it until you tried it on a heavy, very fast rc that does everything well. Especially with proper equipment and a feature with heading hold.

Prefect drifts, high speed handling, ect. And... they turn off!
jza70r likes this.
Dave_S is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2017, 01:39 AM
  #19  
Tech Champion
 
Roelof's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Holland
Posts: 7,185
Default

Originally Posted by slick2500 View Post
99% of people using gyros aren't racing. Gyros aren't legal in races anyway nor should they be. Gyros are for the average Tom, Dick and Harry who want to bash their rc car and not have to worry about having the perfect suspension setup on every single car. Gyros have their place that is it.
The problem is that todays avarage Tom, Dick and Harry show less interest in the technology of the cars with the example that nitro is slowly dying because they think it is difficult and advise others not to go nitro as well.

Yes, a gyro makes driving easy but with that people forget how to drive without them (as with helicopters there are a few who can fly w/o them). Also with that they do not learn how to setup cars correctly and finally they loose the real experience of controling a car.

And why its bad? The racing scene is loosing drivers every year, fresh starters are hardly stepped in, for sure if they only can/want drive cars with all kind of non race legal electronics.
Roelof is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2017, 06:03 AM
  #20  
Tech Master
 
Lone Drifter's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: SW Chicago Burbs
Posts: 1,106
Default

The Day the make Gyros legal for racing is the day i will Quit racing !
Lone Drifter is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2017, 08:30 AM
  #21  
Tech Regular
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 289
Default

Just got my Futaba 440 car gyro. It is very nice. Much, much smaller than the helicopter FBL gyro.
Less parameters to adjust but it is tuned well as it comes. One main difference is the helicopter gyro works best at a gain around 20%, whereas Futaba have the firmware programmed so a gain around 50% works best.

I use the AVCS mode on both the heli gyros and the Futaba Car gyro.

These are the practice cars on which on which I'm using the gyros. Surface is concrete, unprepared.


TRF 101. This is my old carpet racer. Sitting on the shelf since I got the TRF 102. With the gyro the 101 is fantastic on the concrete. I'm using on old set of the spec f1 Tamiya tires.

TB04 Pro II. I ran this chassis as VTA for a season then had to upgrade to a TRF chassis for VTA as the club got too serious. The shaft drive is nice on the concrete, because little rocks won't get caught in the belts.

I actually have 2 of the TB04 Pros for concrete practice. 25.5, and one with a 10.5 motor. They are geared for about the same speed, the 10.5 is the clear winner as it runs way cooler due to the hairpin turns on the track.

TT02 S-spec. 17.5 This is a nice practice car because of the durable tub chassis, shaft drive, low price and it uses the same A-arms and suspension as on the TB04s and my TRF carpet cars (419, 417, etc).

Just to emphasize the main feature of the gyro. It lets one drive very hard into and out of the slippery un-prepared concrete, as if it were high-grip carpet. This makes practice time more similar to race day. Otherwise the cars need to be driven more like they are on a dirt track, which did not seem to contribute to my on-road carpet skills.
MatsNorway and Dave_S like this.

Last edited by ic-racer; 11-05-2017 at 08:49 AM.
ic-racer is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2017, 08:42 AM
  #22  
Tech Regular
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 289
Default

Update. Tried it on one of our mini-coopers M05. There was no benefit with the high grip tires. Those tires are fantastic on the concrete and the cars can even traction roll. We couldn't tell much difference with and without the gyro on these cars.
MatsNorway likes this.
ic-racer is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2017, 08:47 AM
  #23  
Tech Regular
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 289
Default

I also put together a drift car a while back. Mostly to practice car control, not that I have much interest in drifting per say.

I'm not sure what benefit the gyro will have in that car as it is 4WD, so it drifts through the corners in a 4 wheel drift, ie with the steering wheel straight. The car is steered with the throttle and on concrete it works very well. Maybe the drift gyros work better on the 2WD 'countersteer' cars.
ic-racer is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2017, 10:08 AM
  #24  
Tech Master
 
Dave_S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 1,492
Default

When I'm drifting or maintaining an oversteer on my 1/8 and 1/5 4wd rcs the gyro helps make long, consistent, "pretty" drifts.
Dave_S is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-05-2017, 10:42 AM
  #25  
Tech Fanatic
 
slick2500's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Rapid City SD
Posts: 807
Default

Originally Posted by Roelof View Post
The problem is that todays avarage Tom, Dick and Harry show less interest in the technology of the cars with the example that nitro is slowly dying because they think it is difficult and advise others not to go nitro as well.

Yes, a gyro makes driving easy but with that people forget how to drive without them (as with helicopters there are a few who can fly w/o them). Also with that they do not learn how to setup cars correctly and finally they loose the real experience of controling a car.

And why its bad? The racing scene is loosing drivers every year, fresh starters are hardly stepped in, for sure if they only can/want drive cars with all kind of non race legal electronics.
The average Tom, Dick and Harry also has zero interest in racing, these are toys cars remember that. And I am pretty sure that gyros are killing racing.

The thing that seems to be killing racing is the current racers, they take things way to seriously and think that everything should be about racing and for racing. Remember racing is only just a part of this hobby. Not Everything has to be about or for racing all the time.

Bashers are a large part of this hobby so of course the manufacturers are going to cater to them as well. And these gyros, TSM, AVC ect are designed for bashers that could give two ****s about racing.

Nitro will continue to decline because in a lot of places you cannot run them. And the amount of places you cannot run them is increasing. Nitro is not more difficult it is more time consuming, when I ran my nitro car I would have to dedicate at least 2 hours of time to driving it, including finding a place to run it, retuning as needed as the weather here is bipolar one day its 80* and sunny the next it is 17* and snowing, then finally driving it.
Billy Kelly likes this.

Last edited by slick2500; 11-05-2017 at 10:52 AM.
slick2500 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2017, 05:24 AM
  #26  
Tech Elite
iTrader: (5)
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Far south suburbs of Chicago area
Posts: 4,662
Trader Rating: 5 (100%+)
Default

I’ve always found the surface to be part of the challenge of running touring cars. Takes practice to learn how to drive it. Temperature has effect. Surface I run during summer is very different during winter.

Driving aids aren’t the reason racing is down. It’s far more then that.

While I don’t like them, I do understand why brands are now using them more. Average person only drives couple times a month. Plus good for helping young kids get started. Though most kids seem to pick up driving quickly, it’s stopping they struggle with. A kids size controller would help that.

What I don’t like about them is they become like a cheat code in video games. Once you get used to it, they never stop using it.
Billy Kelly is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2017, 10:39 AM
  #27  
Tech Fanatic
 
slick2500's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Rapid City SD
Posts: 807
Default

Originally Posted by Billy Kelly View Post
Iíve always found the surface to be part of the challenge of running touring cars. Takes practice to learn how to drive it. Temperature has effect. Surface I run during summer is very different during winter.

Driving aids arenít the reason racing is down. Itís far more then that.

While I donít like them, I do understand why brands are now using them more. Average person only drives couple times a month. Plus good for helping young kids get started. Though most kids seem to pick up driving quickly, itís stopping they struggle with. A kids size controller would help that.

What I donít like about them is they become like a cheat code in video games. Once you get used to it, they never stop using it.
I like to play the game through once then go back through it again with cheat codes. GTA V is pretty fun with the trainer. Nothing like getting a 5 star wanted level spawning a jet and flying off lol.
Kind of like abs in cars, there are so many people who have no idea how to stop a car without abs.
slick2500 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2017, 04:28 AM
  #28  
Tech Apprentice
 
KristofferR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Sweden
Posts: 89
Default

I have often thought about using a 3-axis (since 2-axis are not common) and put a channel on the throttle/brake.

If tuned right, rotation in mega jumps might be controlled.

Personally, I have not tried a car gyro but itís on my bucket list.

Itís a great tool. I used gyros in aircraft to and fro when practicing new manoeuvres or for improving my skill. Easier to get hover right when someone (ie the gyro) takes the rudder, flying in super windy conditions etc.
KristofferR is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2017, 02:19 PM
  #29  
Tech Master
 
Dave_S's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Northern Illinois
Posts: 1,492
Default

+ YouTube Video
ERROR: If you can see this, then YouTube is down or you don't have Flash installed.
Dave_S is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2017, 02:12 PM
  #30  
Tech Regular
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 289
Default

Another great gyro success. I installed one of my left-over heli rudder gyros in my Tamiya Jimny MF-01X. One problem with this little guy is the servo-saver has a long arm and not easily substituted with a Kimborough. Like many other Tamiya servo-savers, it has a lot of play in the middle and it sticks to one side or the other after the car hits a bump. So trimming for straight-line running is difficult.

Gyro to the rescue. Now the servo saver is a non-issue. The gyro keeps it straight. Works great over rough terrain also! Stays in a straight line.

Who really thinks that when an RC car fly off its intended course from terrain irregularities that is more enjoyable or preferable to the car responding to the g-forces (before you can even see the car move) and correcting itself back to the line you are driving?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
file_26.jpg (161.2 KB, 4 views)
Dave_S likes this.
ic-racer is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service