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Is it worth

Old 08-31-2020, 04:47 PM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by Speed Freak RC View Post
Always have to tinker with it.
I really don't understand this statement as an actual 3D printer owner. All someone has to do occasionally is change the nozzle from wear and tear and re-level the bed if using a low end printer like my Ender 3 Pro. If people are always tinkering to get their printers to work right then they simply have a very poor brand printer. There is way too much printer information available for anyone to end up with a junk printer.
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Old 08-31-2020, 08:41 PM
  #17  
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I started my career out as a cnc machine installer. When i got the 3d printer I spent 3 months tinkering with it. using all the tricks of the trade that I learned over years. Every time I went to print I would use a dial indicator to get everything flat and square. these things change from wear, crashes, or just being turned off.

I got tired of it and stopped making the adjustments. as long as it will print a first layer and it sticks you will get a decent print. now I do nothing except watch the perimeter of the first layer. I adjust the home offset while its running. I might occasionally adjust the corners a hair with the bed leveling knobs but I do it while its printing. if the printer has been setting for a week I may have to do these quick tweaks and then start the print over. Ill print a test print that is just the first layer around the perimeter to make these adjustments.

I dont level the gantry either. but the offsets and table are adjusted so that it prints the first layer properly at startup.

I can load filament after a month of setting run a couple laps around the perimeter, reset the print and it just works.

you do have to calibrate the steps for each axis including the extruder but Ive only ever done that once. it prints within .01 every time. I have a cr10s pro.
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Old 09-01-2020, 04:08 AM
  #18  
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Originally Posted by Bry195 View Post

you do have to calibrate the steps for each axis including the extruder but Ive only ever done that once. it prints within .01 every time. I have a cr10s pro.
I've had my Ender 3 Pro going on 1yr and I've never done this. I watched videos on how to do this but I hit the ground running making very good prints out of the box so I never bothered but it's been on my mind since day one. I've wondered if this is more necessary with DYI or kit type printers?

I'll agree with your observations, I think that as long as your first layer sticks good, you'll likey have a good print even if everything else isn't to perfection.
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Old 09-01-2020, 06:52 AM
  #19  
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Originally Posted by Bry195 View Post
I started my career out as a cnc machine installer. When i got the 3d printer I spent 3 months tinkering with it. using all the tricks of the trade that I learned over years. Every time I went to print I would use a dial indicator to get everything flat and square. these things change from wear, crashes, or just being turned off.

I got tired of it and stopped making the adjustments. as long as it will print a first layer and it sticks you will get a decent print. now I do nothing except watch the perimeter of the first layer. I adjust the home offset while its running. I might occasionally adjust the corners a hair with the bed leveling knobs but I do it while its printing. if the printer has been setting for a week I may have to do these quick tweaks and then start the print over. Ill print a test print that is just the first layer around the perimeter to make these adjustments.

I dont level the gantry either. but the offsets and table are adjusted so that it prints the first layer properly at startup.

I can load filament after a month of setting run a couple laps around the perimeter, reset the print and it just works.

you do have to calibrate the steps for each axis including the extruder but Ive only ever done that once. it prints within .01 every time. I have a cr10s pro.
Glad you got to that point. My Tevo Tornado is in the same boat - I'll watch the purge line and watch the beginning of the first layer and then let it go. I may tweak the bed level 1/8 of a turn on the knobs from time to time, (to account for how thick the hairspray is), but otherwise don't have to touch things much anymore. Send the files to the printer and go - even after weeks...
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Old 09-01-2020, 08:31 PM
  #20  
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Originally Posted by Werty Yui View Post
I've had my Ender 3 Pro going on 1yr and I've never done this. I watched videos on how to do this but I hit the ground running making very good prints out of the box so I never bothered but it's been on my mind since day one. I've wondered if this is more necessary with DYI or kit type printers?

I'll agree with your observations, I think that as long as your first layer sticks good, you'll likey have a good print even if everything else isn't to perfection.
your printer is basically the same as mine just smaller. they are both really inexpensive. for the price im not sure why someone would diy unless they want to tinker. which is fine.

my warning about calibration comes from the fact that steppers notoriously miss steps. the mech and current are all marching in different directions which makes it even more susceptible and the current tuning the factory does is ok but not great. you can try to adjust the current to get the steps perfect but its not necessary. there is a setting for each axis that changes the distance moved for every pulse. print something 200mm long and see if its 200. it wont be. but if you change the parameter for the step/distance ratio by the amount its off it will print at 200mm the next time and probably forever or until something gets mechanically worn.

the extruder steps were quite a bit off which leads to under or overfill but its easy to dial in with the feed parameter.
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Old 09-02-2020, 01:33 PM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by Bry195 View Post
your printer is basically the same as mine just smaller. they are both really inexpensive. for the price im not sure why someone would diy unless they want to tinker. which is fine.

my warning about calibration comes from the fact that steppers notoriously miss steps. the mech and current are all marching in different directions which makes it even more susceptible and the current tuning the factory does is ok but not great. you can try to adjust the current to get the steps perfect but its not necessary. there is a setting for each axis that changes the distance moved for every pulse. print something 200mm long and see if its 200. it wont be. but if you change the parameter for the step/distance ratio by the amount its off it will print at 200mm the next time and probably forever or until something gets mechanically worn.

the extruder steps were quite a bit off which leads to under or overfill but its easy to dial in with the feed parameter.

Hmmm, I guess I'll look more into this. I haven't had any issues that are due to NOT doing this calibration that I'm aware of but it can't hurt either.

The only issue I have is that I see people with some incredible looking/smooth prints and I I'm too busy to spend time playing with settings to match that. I use Chep's Ender 3 settings with good results but things could look better.
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Old 09-23-2020, 12:29 PM
  #22  
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My question is more about cost. I really only need a body printed, but it's kind of big. I could buy a printer for about $150 + materials, or just pay someone to print it for me. I don't see myself printing much other than this piece, so it's tough to justify the cost of purchase unless I resold it afterwards.
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Old 10-04-2020, 01:30 PM
  #23  
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Originally Posted by nowakowski912 View Post
Is it worth to 3d print parts?
that's not the best idea
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Old 10-11-2020, 09:06 AM
  #24  
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I wouldn't do that.
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